Citation
1982-05-20 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1982-05-20 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Cherry, Lois J. ( Columnist )
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Pierce, Darla ( Columnist )
Heenan, Mabel ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Ponte, Lowell ( Columnist )
Lindsey, Robert ( Columnist )
Kesterson, Lorna ( Columnist )
Deardoff, Edna ( Columnist )
Bennett, L. Jessie ( Columnist )
Pauken, Thomas W. ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
Cieri, Al ( Columnist )
Crunden, Charles ( Columnist )
Newton, Ernest L. ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Zapolski, Mike ( Columnist )
Busard, Earl T. ( Columnist )
Harbour, Bill ( Columnist )
Lehr, John H. ( Columnist )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1982-05-20
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

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Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn3019 ( Digital Id )

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PAGE 1

AMVM9n31VlSVaVA3H Green Valley Improvement District 6e% GHjf Council Nod By Lolp J. Cherry The City Council Monday night adopted the ordinance finalizing creation of Local Improvement District 803 despite an official objection lodged by one of the principal property owners. With the vote of approval, the largest local improvement district ever formed in the state of Nevada became official. The 3,600 acre district, contains 78 separate pieces of property and is now undeveloped and unoccupied, though the major developers have plans for building once the improvement district is established and the water and sewer lines have been installed. The attorney from Pardee Construction Company lodged an official protest on behalf of his firm as the public portion of the hearing on LID 803 was opened for discussion. The improvement district lies between Sunset Roadf and Lake Mead Drive. There will be $4.93 million in bonds so!d by the district to finance construction of a water system and a sewer interception system. The sewer line will begin in the area of Pecos Road and follow a major wash to drop to a collector system then to the new water treatment plant soon to be constructed. The water system will consist of 30 inch pipes that will feed two-3 million gallon reservoirs in the district. Though present residents of the Green VsUey neighborhood are not involved in the district, city officials said they will eventually benefit from the district. A number of new businesses and developments have been approved by the City Council in recent months, but occupancy permits for any completed structures would not be granted until construction is complete. An application by Pardee for rezoning a tract in the district was recently denied by the City Council following heated public hearings and petitions from residents of Green Valley. In recent days, Pardee has sought to reopen discussions with the city council on its application to rezone' a tract for multi-family housing. • Msaa 8nv3iaoiM3d ^IT Y^S NEWSPAPER J Our 33rd Year-137th Edition m^ ZKMV\. hone 564-1881 — All Departments Price 25 Thursday. May 20, 1982 City May^^fe On $16 Million Bond issue One Man's VIEW By MIKE OCALLAGHAN It was like old home week in Moana Stadium last week. This writer walked into the stadium and found his box seat empty and waiting as it has been for years. However, it wasn't the Reno Padres facing San Jose. It was the Basic Wolves facing the Carson City Senators. The Wolves soon established themselves as a team that wouldn't quit. However, there was little doubt that the Senatorstwith a 24-8-1 record was the best in the north. The team from Carson City had plenty of heavy bats and good athletes. When the smoke of the two day war cleared on Saturday the Wolves were 1982 Class AAA baseball champions. The glove of Ray Crunk and the arm and bat of Jay Ortolano was still the talk of high school baseball fans in northern Nevada several days after the game. It took all of the Wolves to win the title, but Ortolano was properly named the MVP of the championship series. Henderson can be proud of the newly crowned champions of Nevada Class AAA baseball. They are a classy team coached by Gary Chaires, a man with great ability who gives his players th? confidence needed to become champions. Gov. Robert List told an audience in Elko that his tax plan is working just exactly as it should be expected to work. He said, "The fact that government is collecting less money in taxes is proof that it is working as planned." "That is exactly what we int e nd e d," he told the gathering of county fiscal ofHcers. Okay, if you say so, Bob. This writer thought government was collecting less money because off a recession which resulted in less sales tax money. If the state actu* ally anticipated the recession and still put tl* tax burden on to the buyers in our markets, then the governor's statement is correct. Wolandi writes the following definitions: -'— Hockshop -* The loansomest place in town, but also the bvsiest in Las Vegas. OneMM'iViMV SeePoftl Preliminary work for the possible presentation of a $16 million capital improvements bonds for the November election for residents of Henderson was approved by the city council Monday night. The improvements being discussed include jail facilities, fire division, parks and recreation, public works, road priority and storm drainage. Burrows, Smith and Company is currently working on a schedule of estimates of cost to the taxpayers for each group of the proposed projects The city council was told Monday that it could stop the bond vote procedure "anywhere along the way" and not encumber the city except for legal proceedings. The maximum fee of the bond council will be $2500 to handle all legal proceedings up to the general election. During 1979 and 1980 the citysold$5.5million inbonds with the proceeds being utlilized for water and sewer related capital projects. The funds now remaining will probably be used during this fiscal year or the coming year and at that point there would be no ongoing capital projects funded by G.O. bonds. The city's legal debt limit as of June 30 of this year will be approximately $31.8 million of which it will have $7.1 million outstanding. The property tax in the city is $1.80 per $100 of assessed valuationof which $133 goes to the City of Henderson and the remainder to the school district arid the county. Of the 13.3 cents going to the city 9.69 cents goes to service the city's general obligation debt. Duringthe month of April representatives from the various city departments assembled a list of current needs for a capital improvement program for submission to the city council for consideration. That list's estimated cost was $54,135,705. From that needs list a group of projects totalling approximately $16 million was selected for possible submission to the electorate in November. Should the council choose to recommend any or all of these projects to the voters official action must be taken by May 25. Councilman Gary Price said he "don't feel comfortable with the bond issue and voted against the presentation. Councilmen Ken Anderson and Cloyd Lovitt said they felt the voters should have a chance fo say no. Councilwoman Loran Kesterson said she felt the voters would turn down the bond issue but was willing "to give them a chance to do it." City Manager Bob Anselmo said that if something is not done about the city's streets thecity would have to hang up a sign "rough City May Vote See Page 2 Seniors Picnic isDayofFun The Henderson Seniors for Seniors organization held its annual picnic last Saturday with over 150 seniors eating hot dogs, hamburgers and salad while playing cards or bingo in Morrell Park. Three ladies were presented with awards including Judy Brennan aVid Emma Jessop who became official "Curmudgeons" while Smiles Cunningham was presented with a certificate of apprcc iatton^and—|COURT-The cement slab for the new Justice Court is being smoothed by workman Lance Coty who is employed by C&E Concrete. New Justice Court Well Underway a gift. Chairman Frank Thompson, known as the "man of many hats" picked up those without transportation in a vehicle provided by Parks and Recreation. He then donned his apron and aided Oscar Flagg and Hank Phiffer with the barbeque. After every one had eaten he slipped into his "master of ceremonies" hat and called Bingo. Trucks began pouring ce ment Tuesday in to the forms for the slab of the new Justice Court being constructed adjacent to Henderson's City Hall. As construction continued, the city council approved a rec^uest fro m Ju stice of the Peace Larry Tabony to dig a sewer line behind the court room to the main line, take out part of the lawn for a parking area, remove five trees in front of the police department and waive fees and licenses for construction. In his request for the council's action, Tabony said "I realize the City is not in the best shape financially at present time, but within the first year, you will be repaid_with-jnonies collectedby the lease agreement. "I am asking for this help so that the full $125,000 can be used for the office itself. The furniture will be supplied by a separate fund set up by the county." In other action Monday night the council awarded the bid for rehabilitation of city tennis courts to Pacific Tennis Courts of City of Commerce, California who was the lowest of two bidders with a proposaj^ of Neightx)rs Complain About Old Vegas $21,900. The amount is to be charged to the Special Recvreation Fund. Revenue sharing funds for the fiscal yer 1981-82 will be used for salaries of police officers. Ambulance Rate Hike Under Discussion An ordinance which would raise ambulance charges in the city will be discussed by the city council at a committee meeting to be held June 7 at 7 p.m. in the city council chambers. The proposal to be presented to the councfl raises the basic pickup charge for ambulance service within the city from $35 to $75. Pickup outside the city limits would raise the fee from $50 to $100. Mileage charged ouftide the city would be $2 per mile and medical supplies would be itemized as to cost for $5. Medicare billing would be adjusted after payment'is received,'The ambulanee is operated by the city fire department. Another ordinance to be discussed will be a sign ordinance wiiicli has, Jfe^^ under study by the city for over a year. The ordinance outlines what permits are required, general requirements, offsite requirements, maintenance and removal of signs and allowable locations. Another ordinance M^iich would annex approximately 16 acres into the city in section 13 was read jn title and referred to the June 7 meeting. Saying that Old Vegas is not being a very good neigh_bor, residents of Secti on 2 7 attended Monday's night's City Council Meeting to lodge complaints. Simulated gun fights, loud music and fireworks late in the evening were part of the complaints. Several spokesmen said they had heard rumors that Old Vegas planned to expand on a tract that would bring the park's facilities closer to the neighborhood area and in the expansion there were plans for a rodeo arena. A city official said he had not received any word of planned expansion. When Councilman Gary Price asked City Attorney John Marchiano if Old Vegas was subject to following the noise ordinance, Marchiano said the amusezoned and expressed doubt that anti-noise enforcement could be used. Dave Garrett, Environmental Control Officer for the city, said last year shortly after Old Vegas opened, he spent several weeks monitoring noise levels and he said the noise was within environmental guidelines. Much of the complaints centered around fireworks which were set off at 10:34 p.m. on May 4. Residents said the explosions were without warning and many were unable to sleep following the fireworks. Following considerable discujBsion, the council directed Marchiano to contact the principals at Old Vegas in an effort to see what can be done about the music and j^nfights. \ m^

PAGE 2

Pge 2 Henderson Honils News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, May 20,1982 OiM Man's View {U^inmf§.}) Auction • A noisy place where people get something for nodding. Pessimist • An optimist who discovered the energy shortage on the race traclc. His horses ran out of gas. Gross Ignorance One hundred forty-four times worse than ordinary ignorance. Egoist A person who is always me-deep in conver* sation. Coincide When caught in a rain without umbrella, a sensible thing to do. Abalone What the people say after listening to politicians. Fad Something that goes into one era and out the other. Off-day A day after a day off. Bore An individual who has nothing to say and says it. Acoustic You cannot shoot pool without it. One-horse town A place where all the lights dim when you plug in your electric razor. The $2,500 per plate dinner for the opportunity to dine with Vice President George Bush and Gov. Robert List makes one believe that ReaganomiCB must be making money for some people. The funds from the dinner, kMted by Cliff Perlman in bis Caesars Palace penthoufc, will go for the reelectio^n campaign of List. This brings back memories of 1970 when my Republican opponent for governor held a 11,000 a plate dinner to raise funds. Some of us thought that was a rather expensive meal and held 99 cent barbecues at both ends of the state. The barbecue in Reno was held in a park and over 10,000 people enjoyed the food, drinks and music. If the big money boys will spend $2,500 to dine with Bush, they should be willing to cough up at least $10,000 for a meal with President Reagan. Twenty-two men who played for the Reno Silver Sox and Padres are now in the major leagues. Watch for these former players during the season. National League -Chicago Cubs, Dick Tidrow; Cincinnati Reds, Jim Kern; Houston Astros, Alan Ashby; Philadelphia Phillies, Ed Farmer; San Diego Padres, Floyd Chiffer, Dave Edwards, Juan Eichelberger, Tim Flannery, Doug Gwosdz, Gary Lucas, Gene Richards, Erit Snow; San Francisco Giants, Duane Kuiper. American League Baltimore Orioles, John Lowenstein; Boston Red Sox, Dennis Eckersley; Cleveland Indians, Rick Manning; New York Yankees, Butch Wynegar; Oakland A's, Jeff Newman; Seattle Mariners, Larry Andersen; Toronto Blue Jays, Jerry Garvin, Alfredo Griffin, Hosken Powell. Burglars Ransack Stepman Dodge Unknown suspect(s) broke into the Ben Stepman Dodge sales office over the weekend, and then ransacked the building. Owners Jim Koon and Ray Gonzales reported that $100 in currency was missing along with a Betamax player component that was valued at $1000. According to police reports, the suspect(s) entered the sales office by breaking the rear office window sometime between late Saturday evening and early Monday morning. They proceeded to ransack each of the individual sales offices inside the building, scattering papers and files. The portable safe was tampered with, but no money was taken according to the owners. Approximately $1300 damage was reported by the owners of Joe's VW Service at 860 E. Lake Mead Drive. Apparently three juveniles destroyed four glass panels when they tossed rocks at the roadside business sign. In other police business, Terrill Lee Morris, 22, was cited for DUI and leaving the^cene of an accident on Sunday. "Morris hit a parked car, owned by Michele DuPont of Reno, while traveling east on Jann. He left the scene of the accident, but was later stopped by police. At that time the arresting officer noted the smell of intoxicants on Morris' breath, and cited him for drunk driving, according to police reports. ~ Bradley Alan Lane was charged with embfezzelment when he allegedly took $100 in currency fromthe sporting goods department cash register at the K-Mart department store,according to police. G^ Homeowner's Association Functioning Although as of late it has not been very active, Green Valley does have a Homeowner's Association. One reason the association has been relatively dormant in the last months i3 "because there is no issue," according4o-GeoFge Carter, president of the association. : Carter, also a member of 'the Henderson Planning Commission, explained that the Homeowner's Association was formed at a time when many zoning issues Virere being debated and many Green Valley residents were very concerned. Currently the most debated zoning matter concerning Green Valley Deals with the Collins Brothers' proposal to change 85 acres west of Arroyo Grande from rural residence to manufacturing in order to build a plant that wilt manufacture homes to be shipped to a homesite. Carter recently represented the association at a city council meeting on behalf of Pardee Construction Company, also which was applying to rezone two tracts of land from rural residential to two family residential and limited multiple residence. • Other than these recent interests, the association has had little action. • "It's tough to get homeowners to come to the meetings," said Carter, who has been president of the association since the fall of 1980. He estimated between 30^and^40 homeowners are presently members of the association. Carter explained that the Homeowner's Association has not held a meeting yet this year. "I've remained interested (in the Association) with an option that if something happens I'll call a meeting," Carter said. For anyone interested in more information, call Carter at 458-7568. Landscaping Design Intricate Part of Green Valley Plaza Building a shopping' center involves many devils, from a particular kind ^f construction material to tiee to the type of stores leasing space. Often overlooked by some but just as important to the intricate plans of a shopping center is the landscaping. When the Green Valley Plaza shopping center was designed, particular care was given to the landscaping features according to David Goldstein, project manager for American Nevada Corporation, overall developers of Green Valley. Located in Nevada's Urgest master-planned Community, the shopping center landscaping includes i wide complement of plants §nd trees, creating a luxurious, serene atmosphere. z Goldsetin said the focal point of the second phase of ^reen Valley Plaza will be a 30 foot "majestic and colorI ful" theme tower. Surrounding the tower are shrubbery planters (with their own benches) filled with Eucalyptus trees. "Eucalyptus trees give i feeling of height withstrong, graceful lines," Goldstein explained. Outside of the Eucalyptus tree planters are Crepe Myrtle trees. Goldstein said these low branching, deciduous trees, when ftilly grown, will "provide adequate sign visibility in addition to a hearty, green feeling." ^-^Also adding to the pleasant surroundings of Green Valley Plaza are Pink Lady shrubberies. Blossoming twice a year in pink, Goldstein noted,that,the blooms will last approximately six weeks. Pleasing to the olfactory senses are the Star Jasmine plants in some of the planters. Not only will the jasmine emit a pleasant scent, but the flve-pointed star design Will also bring visual enjoyment. Green Valley Plaza, both phase one and two, has been entirely landscaped, Goldstein said, and the variety of plants and trees are repeated throughout the 60 percent leased shopping' center. The planters and trees line the shop space in phase one of Green Valley Plaza housing Escape Travel, Valley Bank, Green Valley Grocery, Al Phillips The Cleaner, Merluzzi Dance Studio, Mario's Hair Design II, Country Classics Western Wear and one of the largest Smith's Super Food King stores, with over 43,000 square feet. The lush landscaping continues into phase two of the shopping center, which is in completion stages, and is currently composed of Carrara Cards, Videorama, Dirty Dog Inn and Anne's Flowers. \ A -^ Green Valley Professional Center Grows As the Green Valley Plaza shopping center continues to expand, more and more residents are taking advantage of the varied retail and commercial stores locating there. Green Valley also provides an office center for the growing number of businesses moving into the community. Located in Nevada's largest master-planned community, the Green Valley Professional Center has been open since May of 1981 and is already 85 percent leased. One of the main reasons the occupancy rate, of the 25,000 square foot professional center is so high is the advantages offered by the community, according to Leslie Bausher, marketing director for American Nevada Corporation, overall developers of Green Valley. The convenience of living, shopping and banking within walking distance in Green Valley provides a distinct advantage for tenants in the professional center. Tenants now enjoying the garden office space provided by the professional center include Henderson Realty, Inc., Metropolitan Development Corporation (one of Green Valley's homebuilders). First American Title Company of Nevada, Parallax Corporation and American International Adjustment Co. A major national medical corporation recently signed a lease for 5,000 square feet of space in the professional center to be developed as a U Phillip The Cleaners Drydeaning Las Vegas Style medical care facility. The very sleek and streamlined $1.3 million professional center building, designed by the award-winning Newport Beach firm of Langdon & Wilson affords every modern state-of-the-art convenience to its occupants and complements the surrounding landscape and desert atmosphere. The single story, reflective glass garden structure features passive solar efficiency and extensive landscaping. Realizing the great business potential available in Green Valley, many businesses are now enjoying the comforts of the Green Valley Professional Center provided by the community's 20-year master plan >f by Daria Pierce Many local businesses claim to be the finest in their trade in Las Vegas, but not many claim to be the best in the world. Al Phillips The Cleaner does and has the credentials to prove it. Voted Outstanding Dry Cleaner of the Year in 1970, the drydeaning chain has also been a membei-of the International Conference of Varsity Cleaners since 1970, and will serve as chairman of the 1984 convention. According to Mel Shapiro, who with brother Phillip established the chain of drydeaning stores, the Varsity Cleaners group is an elitist organization composed of drydeaning owners from all over the world. Each year the group meets to discuss new innovations, exchange information and present original research studies on what occurred in their particular-store the past year. One catch to participating in the annual conference, though, is that a company may not receive a return in-vitetton-for^the-next yearr Shapiro said each company is graded on the performance of the presentation given by its representatives. If it is done well, the company will be invited for the following year. The Shapiro brothers have done well ever since they bought the first Al Phillips The Cleaner store in 1964 in Commercial Center. The original owner's name was Al Phillips and the Shapiros decided to keep the name to take advantage of the advertising money already spent by Phillips on the store. Honn Seeking Donations Betty Honn's Animal Adoptions is still seeking additional donations and needs at least $10,000 to move three buildings donated to the City of Henderson for the animal adoption center. The donation was made by Nellis Air Force. Deadline for moving the buildings is May 20. The structures will be used to furnish shelter and veterinary offices for the animals as well as housing for the working staff Since January, Honn's facility has taken in an addiional 183 dogs and adopted ut 219. Fifty five cats of 72 were adopted out and 41 people were given aid. Since 1964, six additional Al Phillips The Cleaners have opened in the Las Vegas area, including the most recent location in Green Valley Plaza. Shapiro reported that the Green Valley store is already doing very well. Mel and Phil came to Las Vegas specifically to open a drydeaning business. Phil had oWned a drycleaner in Booklyn, N.Y., their home town, called "Jules," before arriving in Las Vegas, while Mel had been a stand-up comedian. He decided to quit show business when he became "tired of starving." Still possessing outrageous senses of humor, the Shapiro brothers also have good business sense. Through hard work and unique ideas, Al Phillips The Cleaner stores have become one of the most innovative drycleaners i the world. Al Phillips was the first drycleaner to incorporate drive-through service, operate 24 hours a day, shine shoes and stay open seven days a week. "While people go to services on Sunda y, we service ^•eople on Sundays,^ Mei^ remarked. He added that the drive-through service makes picking up or dropping off clothes more enjoyable and convenient "People don't like going to the cleaners, it's a chore, like taking out the trash," Mel explained. "We make that service easy for you," he said, adding that customers don't really have to make a formal stop. Many of the ideas created by the brothers for their drycleaner have been as a direct result of the Las Vegas lifestyle -always going and open 24 hours eaich and every day. "Las Vegas knows how to accept new ideas," Mel said. "And we know exactly how to clean Las Vegas' clothes. We're available to the needs of the community, and our hours accommodate the needs of the community." Mel also said he and Phil are constantly "popping ideas at each other" in order to "perform a service which heretofore hasn't been performed." One key to Al Phillips The Cleaners' success, according to Mel, is "incorporating good design" into each store location itself. "We want a nice environment for people to walk into," Mel explained, noting that each of their drycleaners has attractive wall decor and a stylish clock, implying "fast service." ^ Another facet of Al Phil" lips' design are the carhops at the drive-through locations. The girls wait on customers outfitted in specially-designed costumes that are restyled three times a year. The girls" themselves also have to pasi muster will Mel and Phil beJore being hired. _^ Only three irat-t)f^B hundred girls interviewed, are chosen to be Al Phillips.: carhops, Mel said, explaia% ing that they look for girU. with the right combination of looks and personality. "We don't want overly sexy types, we want more of the stewardess type," Mel said. The care giveh to each detail of the drydeaning busi-, ness by Phil and Mel Shap-r iro have been successful so far, and there's no sign of: looking back. If there is ar way to improve their sier-" vice, you can bet th'e Shapiros will find it. City May Vote Cent From Page 1 streets" and let it go at that. A discussion was held on what the cost to the taxpayers would be and that will be presented at the next meeting. Finance Director Bob Kasner said the bonds; would be sold over a six year period and that voters: would have a chance to vote yes or no on the various! categories. i tittuiiiillti:a (itTit IMlONMlMH > NKkfirtl J*bB PtMr Zcaatr An Independent Sews/taper Founded June I. 1951 Puhlivhcd ftrj TiM>di|r ind Tkundiy marniA(.4l il tut Mrcti. Hi< Hm< Nwi ti(f (or UK or poiiibl* UH in ikii iMotpiptr 4it iht wk proftrtf of ih Htr\drofl Ht M'tM RIPTIONS KATES: Niniiu < ofr n itnt Mttt wmt >!• Monlhi m Thrtt MMIM i 00 MAIL ^LBM RIPTIONS Mun •( Mitiiiiippi ;„ 1100 pr y*ti UUU lor III mMfht Eoi o< Mitiiiuppi 1000 pr KM (M MI IWIMIH w Thursday. May 20. im New Church In Henderson UNITED METHODIST OFFICERS Following impressive services which were conducted by District Superintendent Dr. Galal Gough Sunday, the first slate of officers was named for the new Henderson United Methodist Church. The officers are s^own in above photo. FRONT ROW from left: Pat Earl, Frances Gilbert, Hazel Miller, Silveretta Greening, Sue Thomas, Sally Bossi, Mabel Newton, Beverly Davis, Gloria Aaron. Second row from left: George Tyding, Laura Tyd ing, Dorothy Vondenbrink, Dr. Galal Gough, District Superintendent, Pastor C-eorge Bondley, Jean Bault, Emily Carol Busard, Earl Busard, Max Bossi. Third row from left: Cleo Weese, Kathy Weese (not visible), Richard Erickson, Harold Miller, Alma Vondenbrink, Ron Determan. Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 3 RSVP Center Room 29 < Civic Center By Mabel Heenan The SENIORS FOR SENIORS picnic was a huge success, weather was perfect and the Seniors for Seniors cooks really out did themselves so tasty, served Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, Beans, and Potato Salad, and the trimmings and after Bin^o was served home made cakes. Then played 10 games of Bingo and winners were -Marg. Christensen, Yvonne Sylvester, Doris Hammergram, Harlan Diller, Ray Olthon, Ann Ahrens, Floyd Hetrick, Josephine Bitsche, Anna Worswick, Emma Jessop. For coverall there were two winfiers Ann Ahrens received home made Lemon Pie, Lela Busher won a Chocolate Cake. We had 115 attend this picnic. We thank Frank Thompson for doing all the calling of the bingo. And transportating the Seniors that didn't have a ride. Also thank the Parks and Recreation for the use of the bus. In all it was a wonderful day for the seniors. Father Caviglia came out and made three awards Edith (Judy) Brennan Curmudgeon Award,^mma Jessop a Curmudgeon Award and Smiles Cunningham Appreciation Award also a gift. So thanks to the Seniors for Seniors for a wonderful day for the seniors of Henderson. Well today is another beautiful day for the Seniors social day. We started the day with Canasta and then Bingo Winners were, Janet Blatnik, Jess Spencer, Ethel Wells, Edith Hetrick, Penny Love, Floyd Hetrick, Peg Peterson, Richard Leavitt, Edith (Judy) Brennan. Coverall won by Ann Ahrens, Floyd Hetrick, and Thelma Em, merick. Host today Harry Youngs, Hostess Betty Ross. Such goodies then back to canasta. Door prize won by Ann Ahrens. Next week Hostesses will be Ann Ahrens and Janet Blatnik. Have a good week and take care. See you all next week as its McDonalds Birthday of the month of May for the Seniors. Administrator I II rr At Family Medical Center D. Bryce Rose of Henderson has been named Administrator for the new Family Medical Center which is scheduled to open this Monday, May 24. The new medical complex is located at 4000 East Charleston Blvd. Rose brings to the position 24 years of experience in health care administration in both proprietary and nonpoprofit hospitals and has been active in developing plans for the Family Medical Center for the past year. He received his edu-. cation in health care, management from the University of Detroit and earned an M.B.A. from University of Southern California. Treasurer of the Southern Council of the Nevada Hospital Association from 1980-81 and has also served as First Education Chairman of the United Hospital Association in Los Angeles, California. Rose and his wife Jean, who is the Chief Medical Technologist at St. Rose de Lima Hospital, have lived in Henderson for five years. The highest percentage of unmarried males in the country live in the city of Columbia, South Carolina. Bryce Rose He has published two articles in the Journal of Western Health Care entitled "Fringe Benefits As A Direct Cost" and "A Personal View of Personnel Policies". Rose was SecreJ^ry WINNIE RETIRES After 30 years of serving the people of Henderson at the post oMce, Winnie Lowes retired May 16 and she was honored with a party frori her co-workers. Her husband, Lloyd, retired several years ago after serving 20 years at the local post office. She was presented an emblem rug, shown above, made by a post office clerk, Vic Tetite and his wife. She was also presented with a 1982 mint set for the year of her retirement by Tom and Sandy Morgan of Burton Street. A great'lover "of candy, Winnie was also presented with some of her favorite candy by her co-workers. She underwent surgery in February, but when/^be recovers she and her husband plan to travel. Youth Choir Begins at Vegas Valley Christian Church A youth choir has been formed at Vegas Valley Christian Church for ages 4 years through 3rd grade. The choir practices every Sunday at 6:15 p.m. and will be presenting special music at church services. At the 6 p.m. family hour on Sundays, classes and activities for all ages are held following a song service in the Sanctuary -there is PET OF THE WEEK something for everyone. "Removing Your Mountains" is the title of the worship message by Minister Daye Brown at 10 a.m. Sunday, May 23rd. The folks at Vegas Valley Christian Church invite you to join them in their worship services and share in fellowship. The church is located in south-east Las Vegas at 5515 Mountain Vista between Tropicana and Russell Road. In a potential flash flood situation, know where high ground is and scout out how to get there quickly. DMV Announces Office Hours Change For Henderson In an effort to provide better service to the working public, the Department of Motor Vehicles is ch anging its hours efTectlveTlineT, 1982, to 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. each Tuesday and Wednesday. The Department has been conducting an evaluation of the effectiveness of the present hours at the Hen^ derson Field Office. According to Barton Jacka, DMV Director, the indications are that the publicwouldprefer service between the hours of 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. rather than the present afternoon hours between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. You're invited to the Reid-For-Congress Headquarters Opening A come-as-you-are party will take place 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, May 25th at 4660 S. Eastern Fl AMINC.O TROPICANA AVfc bWANT TO 00 TO A HOME-IUi EiQaib old fMMk mfad loBsbONd CUhaahi Sbvnttaig whh MMrgy and 4y BMds a *^ m nain Mr CVMI luipplar. Ms ud aui Migii and cat! cut ba adoplad boia lBnil'1 ^-'— • Shaltor locaind o Maaw ^ Attend CHURCH Sunday^^ SMntorad By Spectaetdid 9MC. Sp C\(X lining m COMPllTIr AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR WITH THE LATEST HtaRQNIC EQ UIP M ENT CONVENIENT COMFORTABLE WAITING ROOM ONE DAY SERVICE We're only 8 miles from Henderson! „mini I'll /. "I llii -/KM ) 705 9t|)M Way BouMClCtiy 293^776 NEVADA KNOW-HOW HarryReid FOR U.S. CONGRESS \

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Pge 2 Henderson Honils News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, May 20,1982 OiM Man's View {U^inmf§.}) Auction • A noisy place where people get something for nodding. Pessimist • An optimist who discovered the energy shortage on the race traclc. His horses ran out of gas. Gross Ignorance One hundred forty-four times worse than ordinary ignorance. Egoist A person who is always me-deep in conver* sation. Coincide When caught in a rain without umbrella, a sensible thing to do. Abalone What the people say after listening to politicians. Fad Something that goes into one era and out the other. Off-day A day after a day off. Bore An individual who has nothing to say and says it. Acoustic You cannot shoot pool without it. One-horse town A place where all the lights dim when you plug in your electric razor. The $2,500 per plate dinner for the opportunity to dine with Vice President George Bush and Gov. Robert List makes one believe that ReaganomiCB must be making money for some people. The funds from the dinner, kMted by Cliff Perlman in bis Caesars Palace penthoufc, will go for the reelectio^n campaign of List. This brings back memories of 1970 when my Republican opponent for governor held a 11,000 a plate dinner to raise funds. Some of us thought that was a rather expensive meal and held 99 cent barbecues at both ends of the state. The barbecue in Reno was held in a park and over 10,000 people enjoyed the food, drinks and music. If the big money boys will spend $2,500 to dine with Bush, they should be willing to cough up at least $10,000 for a meal with President Reagan. Twenty-two men who played for the Reno Silver Sox and Padres are now in the major leagues. Watch for these former players during the season. National League -Chicago Cubs, Dick Tidrow; Cincinnati Reds, Jim Kern; Houston Astros, Alan Ashby; Philadelphia Phillies, Ed Farmer; San Diego Padres, Floyd Chiffer, Dave Edwards, Juan Eichelberger, Tim Flannery, Doug Gwosdz, Gary Lucas, Gene Richards, Erit Snow; San Francisco Giants, Duane Kuiper. American League Baltimore Orioles, John Lowenstein; Boston Red Sox, Dennis Eckersley; Cleveland Indians, Rick Manning; New York Yankees, Butch Wynegar; Oakland A's, Jeff Newman; Seattle Mariners, Larry Andersen; Toronto Blue Jays, Jerry Garvin, Alfredo Griffin, Hosken Powell. Burglars Ransack Stepman Dodge Unknown suspect(s) broke into the Ben Stepman Dodge sales office over the weekend, and then ransacked the building. Owners Jim Koon and Ray Gonzales reported that $100 in currency was missing along with a Betamax player component that was valued at $1000. According to police reports, the suspect(s) entered the sales office by breaking the rear office window sometime between late Saturday evening and early Monday morning. They proceeded to ransack each of the individual sales offices inside the building, scattering papers and files. The portable safe was tampered with, but no money was taken according to the owners. Approximately $1300 damage was reported by the owners of Joe's VW Service at 860 E. Lake Mead Drive. Apparently three juveniles destroyed four glass panels when they tossed rocks at the roadside business sign. In other police business, Terrill Lee Morris, 22, was cited for DUI and leaving the^cene of an accident on Sunday. "Morris hit a parked car, owned by Michele DuPont of Reno, while traveling east on Jann. He left the scene of the accident, but was later stopped by police. At that time the arresting officer noted the smell of intoxicants on Morris' breath, and cited him for drunk driving, according to police reports. ~ Bradley Alan Lane was charged with embfezzelment when he allegedly took $100 in currency fromthe sporting goods department cash register at the K-Mart department store,according to police. G^ Homeowner's Association Functioning Although as of late it has not been very active, Green Valley does have a Homeowner's Association. One reason the association has been relatively dormant in the last months i3 "because there is no issue," according4o-GeoFge Carter, president of the association. : Carter, also a member of 'the Henderson Planning Commission, explained that the Homeowner's Association was formed at a time when many zoning issues Virere being debated and many Green Valley residents were very concerned. Currently the most debated zoning matter concerning Green Valley Deals with the Collins Brothers' proposal to change 85 acres west of Arroyo Grande from rural residence to manufacturing in order to build a plant that wilt manufacture homes to be shipped to a homesite. Carter recently represented the association at a city council meeting on behalf of Pardee Construction Company, also which was applying to rezone two tracts of land from rural residential to two family residential and limited multiple residence. • Other than these recent interests, the association has had little action. • "It's tough to get homeowners to come to the meetings," said Carter, who has been president of the association since the fall of 1980. He estimated between 30^and^40 homeowners are presently members of the association. Carter explained that the Homeowner's Association has not held a meeting yet this year. "I've remained interested (in the Association) with an option that if something happens I'll call a meeting," Carter said. For anyone interested in more information, call Carter at 458-7568. Landscaping Design Intricate Part of Green Valley Plaza Building a shopping' center involves many devils, from a particular kind ^f construction material to tiee to the type of stores leasing space. Often overlooked by some but just as important to the intricate plans of a shopping center is the landscaping. When the Green Valley Plaza shopping center was designed, particular care was given to the landscaping features according to David Goldstein, project manager for American Nevada Corporation, overall developers of Green Valley. Located in Nevada's Urgest master-planned Community, the shopping center landscaping includes i wide complement of plants §nd trees, creating a luxurious, serene atmosphere. z Goldsetin said the focal point of the second phase of ^reen Valley Plaza will be a 30 foot "majestic and colorI ful" theme tower. Surrounding the tower are shrubbery planters (with their own benches) filled with Eucalyptus trees. "Eucalyptus trees give i feeling of height withstrong, graceful lines," Goldstein explained. Outside of the Eucalyptus tree planters are Crepe Myrtle trees. Goldstein said these low branching, deciduous trees, when ftilly grown, will "provide adequate sign visibility in addition to a hearty, green feeling." ^-^Also adding to the pleasant surroundings of Green Valley Plaza are Pink Lady shrubberies. Blossoming twice a year in pink, Goldstein noted,that,the blooms will last approximately six weeks. Pleasing to the olfactory senses are the Star Jasmine plants in some of the planters. Not only will the jasmine emit a pleasant scent, but the flve-pointed star design Will also bring visual enjoyment. Green Valley Plaza, both phase one and two, has been entirely landscaped, Goldstein said, and the variety of plants and trees are repeated throughout the 60 percent leased shopping' center. The planters and trees line the shop space in phase one of Green Valley Plaza housing Escape Travel, Valley Bank, Green Valley Grocery, Al Phillips The Cleaner, Merluzzi Dance Studio, Mario's Hair Design II, Country Classics Western Wear and one of the largest Smith's Super Food King stores, with over 43,000 square feet. The lush landscaping continues into phase two of the shopping center, which is in completion stages, and is currently composed of Carrara Cards, Videorama, Dirty Dog Inn and Anne's Flowers. \ A -^ Green Valley Professional Center Grows As the Green Valley Plaza shopping center continues to expand, more and more residents are taking advantage of the varied retail and commercial stores locating there. Green Valley also provides an office center for the growing number of businesses moving into the community. Located in Nevada's largest master-planned community, the Green Valley Professional Center has been open since May of 1981 and is already 85 percent leased. One of the main reasons the occupancy rate, of the 25,000 square foot professional center is so high is the advantages offered by the community, according to Leslie Bausher, marketing director for American Nevada Corporation, overall developers of Green Valley. The convenience of living, shopping and banking within walking distance in Green Valley provides a distinct advantage for tenants in the professional center. Tenants now enjoying the garden office space provided by the professional center include Henderson Realty, Inc., Metropolitan Development Corporation (one of Green Valley's homebuilders). First American Title Company of Nevada, Parallax Corporation and American International Adjustment Co. A major national medical corporation recently signed a lease for 5,000 square feet of space in the professional center to be developed as a U Phillip The Cleaners Drydeaning Las Vegas Style medical care facility. The very sleek and streamlined $1.3 million professional center building, designed by the award-winning Newport Beach firm of Langdon & Wilson affords every modern state-of-the-art convenience to its occupants and complements the surrounding landscape and desert atmosphere. The single story, reflective glass garden structure features passive solar efficiency and extensive landscaping. Realizing the great business potential available in Green Valley, many businesses are now enjoying the comforts of the Green Valley Professional Center provided by the community's 20-year master plan >f by Daria Pierce Many local businesses claim to be the finest in their trade in Las Vegas, but not many claim to be the best in the world. Al Phillips The Cleaner does and has the credentials to prove it. Voted Outstanding Dry Cleaner of the Year in 1970, the drydeaning chain has also been a membei-of the International Conference of Varsity Cleaners since 1970, and will serve as chairman of the 1984 convention. According to Mel Shapiro, who with brother Phillip established the chain of drydeaning stores, the Varsity Cleaners group is an elitist organization composed of drydeaning owners from all over the world. Each year the group meets to discuss new innovations, exchange information and present original research studies on what occurred in their particular-store the past year. One catch to participating in the annual conference, though, is that a company may not receive a return in-vitetton-for^the-next yearr Shapiro said each company is graded on the performance of the presentation given by its representatives. If it is done well, the company will be invited for the following year. The Shapiro brothers have done well ever since they bought the first Al Phillips The Cleaner store in 1964 in Commercial Center. The original owner's name was Al Phillips and the Shapiros decided to keep the name to take advantage of the advertising money already spent by Phillips on the store. Honn Seeking Donations Betty Honn's Animal Adoptions is still seeking additional donations and needs at least $10,000 to move three buildings donated to the City of Henderson for the animal adoption center. The donation was made by Nellis Air Force. Deadline for moving the buildings is May 20. The structures will be used to furnish shelter and veterinary offices for the animals as well as housing for the working staff Since January, Honn's facility has taken in an addiional 183 dogs and adopted ut 219. Fifty five cats of 72 were adopted out and 41 people were given aid. Since 1964, six additional Al Phillips The Cleaners have opened in the Las Vegas area, including the most recent location in Green Valley Plaza. Shapiro reported that the Green Valley store is already doing very well. Mel and Phil came to Las Vegas specifically to open a drydeaning business. Phil had oWned a drycleaner in Booklyn, N.Y., their home town, called "Jules," before arriving in Las Vegas, while Mel had been a stand-up comedian. He decided to quit show business when he became "tired of starving." Still possessing outrageous senses of humor, the Shapiro brothers also have good business sense. Through hard work and unique ideas, Al Phillips The Cleaner stores have become one of the most innovative drycleaners i the world. Al Phillips was the first drycleaner to incorporate drive-through service, operate 24 hours a day, shine shoes and stay open seven days a week. "While people go to services on Sunda y, we service ^•eople on Sundays,^ Mei^ remarked. He added that the drive-through service makes picking up or dropping off clothes more enjoyable and convenient "People don't like going to the cleaners, it's a chore, like taking out the trash," Mel explained. "We make that service easy for you," he said, adding that customers don't really have to make a formal stop. Many of the ideas created by the brothers for their drycleaner have been as a direct result of the Las Vegas lifestyle -always going and open 24 hours eaich and every day. "Las Vegas knows how to accept new ideas," Mel said. "And we know exactly how to clean Las Vegas' clothes. We're available to the needs of the community, and our hours accommodate the needs of the community." Mel also said he and Phil are constantly "popping ideas at each other" in order to "perform a service which heretofore hasn't been performed." One key to Al Phillips The Cleaners' success, according to Mel, is "incorporating good design" into each store location itself. "We want a nice environment for people to walk into," Mel explained, noting that each of their drycleaners has attractive wall decor and a stylish clock, implying "fast service." ^ Another facet of Al Phil" lips' design are the carhops at the drive-through locations. The girls wait on customers outfitted in specially-designed costumes that are restyled three times a year. The girls" themselves also have to pasi muster will Mel and Phil beJore being hired. _^ Only three irat-t)f^B hundred girls interviewed, are chosen to be Al Phillips.: carhops, Mel said, explaia% ing that they look for girU. with the right combination of looks and personality. "We don't want overly sexy types, we want more of the stewardess type," Mel said. The care giveh to each detail of the drydeaning busi-, ness by Phil and Mel Shap-r iro have been successful so far, and there's no sign of: looking back. If there is ar way to improve their sier-" vice, you can bet th'e Shapiros will find it. City May Vote Cent From Page 1 streets" and let it go at that. A discussion was held on what the cost to the taxpayers would be and that will be presented at the next meeting. Finance Director Bob Kasner said the bonds; would be sold over a six year period and that voters: would have a chance to vote yes or no on the various! categories. i tittuiiiillti:a (itTit IMlONMlMH > NKkfirtl J*bB PtMr Zcaatr An Independent Sews/taper Founded June I. 1951 Puhlivhcd ftrj TiM>di|r ind Tkundiy marniA(.4l il tut Mrcti. Hi< Hm< Nwi ti(f (or UK or poiiibl* UH in ikii iMotpiptr 4it iht wk proftrtf of ih Htr\drofl Ht M'tM RIPTIONS KATES: Niniiu < ofr n itnt Mttt wmt >!• Monlhi m Thrtt MMIM i 00 MAIL ^LBM RIPTIONS Mun •( Mitiiiiippi ;„ 1100 pr y*ti UUU lor III mMfht Eoi o< Mitiiiuppi 1000 pr KM (M MI IWIMIH w Thursday. May 20. im New Church In Henderson UNITED METHODIST OFFICERS Following impressive services which were conducted by District Superintendent Dr. Galal Gough Sunday, the first slate of officers was named for the new Henderson United Methodist Church. The officers are s^own in above photo. FRONT ROW from left: Pat Earl, Frances Gilbert, Hazel Miller, Silveretta Greening, Sue Thomas, Sally Bossi, Mabel Newton, Beverly Davis, Gloria Aaron. Second row from left: George Tyding, Laura Tyd ing, Dorothy Vondenbrink, Dr. Galal Gough, District Superintendent, Pastor C-eorge Bondley, Jean Bault, Emily Carol Busard, Earl Busard, Max Bossi. Third row from left: Cleo Weese, Kathy Weese (not visible), Richard Erickson, Harold Miller, Alma Vondenbrink, Ron Determan. Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 3 RSVP Center Room 29 < Civic Center By Mabel Heenan The SENIORS FOR SENIORS picnic was a huge success, weather was perfect and the Seniors for Seniors cooks really out did themselves so tasty, served Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, Beans, and Potato Salad, and the trimmings and after Bin^o was served home made cakes. Then played 10 games of Bingo and winners were -Marg. Christensen, Yvonne Sylvester, Doris Hammergram, Harlan Diller, Ray Olthon, Ann Ahrens, Floyd Hetrick, Josephine Bitsche, Anna Worswick, Emma Jessop. For coverall there were two winfiers Ann Ahrens received home made Lemon Pie, Lela Busher won a Chocolate Cake. We had 115 attend this picnic. We thank Frank Thompson for doing all the calling of the bingo. And transportating the Seniors that didn't have a ride. Also thank the Parks and Recreation for the use of the bus. In all it was a wonderful day for the seniors. Father Caviglia came out and made three awards Edith (Judy) Brennan Curmudgeon Award,^mma Jessop a Curmudgeon Award and Smiles Cunningham Appreciation Award also a gift. So thanks to the Seniors for Seniors for a wonderful day for the seniors of Henderson. Well today is another beautiful day for the Seniors social day. We started the day with Canasta and then Bingo Winners were, Janet Blatnik, Jess Spencer, Ethel Wells, Edith Hetrick, Penny Love, Floyd Hetrick, Peg Peterson, Richard Leavitt, Edith (Judy) Brennan. Coverall won by Ann Ahrens, Floyd Hetrick, and Thelma Em, merick. Host today Harry Youngs, Hostess Betty Ross. Such goodies then back to canasta. Door prize won by Ann Ahrens. Next week Hostesses will be Ann Ahrens and Janet Blatnik. Have a good week and take care. See you all next week as its McDonalds Birthday of the month of May for the Seniors. Administrator I II rr At Family Medical Center D. Bryce Rose of Henderson has been named Administrator for the new Family Medical Center which is scheduled to open this Monday, May 24. The new medical complex is located at 4000 East Charleston Blvd. Rose brings to the position 24 years of experience in health care administration in both proprietary and nonpoprofit hospitals and has been active in developing plans for the Family Medical Center for the past year. He received his edu-. cation in health care, management from the University of Detroit and earned an M.B.A. from University of Southern California. Treasurer of the Southern Council of the Nevada Hospital Association from 1980-81 and has also served as First Education Chairman of the United Hospital Association in Los Angeles, California. Rose and his wife Jean, who is the Chief Medical Technologist at St. Rose de Lima Hospital, have lived in Henderson for five years. The highest percentage of unmarried males in the country live in the city of Columbia, South Carolina. Bryce Rose He has published two articles in the Journal of Western Health Care entitled "Fringe Benefits As A Direct Cost" and "A Personal View of Personnel Policies". Rose was SecreJ^ry WINNIE RETIRES After 30 years of serving the people of Henderson at the post oMce, Winnie Lowes retired May 16 and she was honored with a party frori her co-workers. Her husband, Lloyd, retired several years ago after serving 20 years at the local post office. She was presented an emblem rug, shown above, made by a post office clerk, Vic Tetite and his wife. She was also presented with a 1982 mint set for the year of her retirement by Tom and Sandy Morgan of Burton Street. A great'lover "of candy, Winnie was also presented with some of her favorite candy by her co-workers. She underwent surgery in February, but when/^be recovers she and her husband plan to travel. Youth Choir Begins at Vegas Valley Christian Church A youth choir has been formed at Vegas Valley Christian Church for ages 4 years through 3rd grade. The choir practices every Sunday at 6:15 p.m. and will be presenting special music at church services. At the 6 p.m. family hour on Sundays, classes and activities for all ages are held following a song service in the Sanctuary -there is PET OF THE WEEK something for everyone. "Removing Your Mountains" is the title of the worship message by Minister Daye Brown at 10 a.m. Sunday, May 23rd. The folks at Vegas Valley Christian Church invite you to join them in their worship services and share in fellowship. The church is located in south-east Las Vegas at 5515 Mountain Vista between Tropicana and Russell Road. In a potential flash flood situation, know where high ground is and scout out how to get there quickly. DMV Announces Office Hours Change For Henderson In an effort to provide better service to the working public, the Department of Motor Vehicles is ch anging its hours efTectlveTlineT, 1982, to 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. each Tuesday and Wednesday. The Department has been conducting an evaluation of the effectiveness of the present hours at the Hen^ derson Field Office. According to Barton Jacka, DMV Director, the indications are that the publicwouldprefer service between the hours of 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. rather than the present afternoon hours between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. You're invited to the Reid-For-Congress Headquarters Opening A come-as-you-are party will take place 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, May 25th at 4660 S. Eastern Fl AMINC.O TROPICANA AVfc bWANT TO 00 TO A HOME-IUi EiQaib old fMMk mfad loBsbONd CUhaahi Sbvnttaig whh MMrgy and 4y BMds a *^ m nain Mr CVMI luipplar. Ms ud aui Migii and cat! cut ba adoplad boia lBnil'1 ^-'— • Shaltor locaind o Maaw ^ Attend CHURCH Sunday^^ SMntorad By Spectaetdid 9MC. Sp C\(X lining m COMPllTIr AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR WITH THE LATEST HtaRQNIC EQ UIP M ENT CONVENIENT COMFORTABLE WAITING ROOM ONE DAY SERVICE We're only 8 miles from Henderson! „mini I'll /. "I llii -/KM ) 705 9t|)M Way BouMClCtiy 293^776 NEVADA KNOW-HOW HarryReid FOR U.S. CONGRESS \

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Yieuipoinl HENDERSON IHt tOMMI MM s Mosr^rn Page 4 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, Nay 20,1982 PUBLISHER MIKE O'CALLAGHAN EDITOR LORNA K E8TER80N CIRCULATION 564-1881 WeCanWn The two recent state championships won by Basic High School, show that we can win. Year after year, Henderson parents and sports fans have sat through countless games with never a winning te^. Still the fans kept coming -hoping that each year would bring success. Local people are known for their support of their young people and even though they didn't win the people showed up for support. This year the Wolves swim team took state, and justjJast week the high school baseball team was named the state champion. Basic High School has always been the "little school" in the Triple A league, but as the school grows it should take its share of wins in the county. f Who Speaks For The People? Little May Be Better The boys on the baseball team, we believe, have an advantage in that they have played together since they were in little leagues. They come from a small-tight-knit community where nearly everyone knows each other. In what other community would 300 people stay up until 1:30 a.m. to welcome home the team from the state championship? Basic has that type of community support that it should draw on. .. Some observers believe that the turn-around in the sports program came when Rich Whitehead came in as football coach. They see a new enthusiasm from the young people, less griping and less problems. We hope the football program also improves for the next year with the new encouragement of two state championships. Basic could set a national record of consecutive losses in football if they continue to lose next year. By Richard Cohen WASHINGTON Comes now before the Supreme Court of the United States the honorable William T. Coleman, former secretary of transportation, noted lawyer and now something very special: a friend of the court. He is appearing in the case of Bob Jones University et al vs. the decency and common sense of the United States of America and he has been summoned by the Court because the government will not do its job. It has quit. Rkiiard Cohen Congratulations We congratulate the baseball team for setting an example for the entife school and especially the sports program. Coach Gary Chaires who has been at Basic for eight years, says he has a "great bunch of kids" and there have been no discipline problems. Tom Crine has assisted coaching the 17 youths on the baseball team. We hope the enthusiasm of the baseball team rubs off in all activities of the school for it shows that we can win. It has quit taking the side of the poor and it has quit taking the side of the oppressed. It has quit being the champion of minorities and women and workers and even passengers in passenger cars. Its friends are the rich andthe powerful, the white and the male, and when it comes to passenger safety, either the people who make cars or maybe the members of the American Association of Plastic Surgeons. In the case at hand, the government has quit insisting that private schools that discriminate on the basis of race are not eligible for tax exemptions. This was the position of the Nixon, Ford, Carter and, it was assumed, Reagan administrations. It was to some consternation, not to mention a great deal of confusion, that the administration announced ithad a new policy. In fact, for a while it had a new policy every week. What it came down to, though, was that the administration was no longer willing to contest the issue with Bob Jones University and other schools that had taken the government to court. So here we were at the Supreme Court where on one side stood the racist institutions and on the other side ... Well, there was no other side. The government would not defend the victory it had won in the lower courts. If racist schools wanted tax (exemptions, they either ought to have them or Congress shle who need it the most. By Lowell Ponte With control of over 57 percent of the world's exportable grain, the United States is the Saudi Arabia of food. Only 8 of the world's 173 nations -the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, South Africa, France, and Thailand consistently produce significantly more food than they consume. In theory, if the United States chose to beat its plowshares into swords, its "food weapon" would be awesome. On January 4, 1980, the United States used food as a weapon for the first time ~ against the Soviet Union. Less than two weeks before, Soviet troops had invaded Afghanistan. Such aggression against an independent nation would not be allowed "with impunity," President Jimmy Carter declared. The President's response: an —embargo on grain sales to the Soviet Unions On April 24,1981, President Reagan lifted the embargo. "From the farmer's point of view, the Soviet embargo was an utter disaster," says Secretary of Agriculture John R. Block. Yet Block does believe'that the United States should be ready and willing *to use food as a weapon. "Over the next twenty years," he has said, "food can be the greatest weapon we have." Those who argue that the United States can by itself wield a "foo(^ weapon" much like OPEC's "oil weapon" tend to forget certain facts. Few nations of the world can simply plant an oil derrick and hit oil. But virtually all nations can plant seeds and produce food. While many countries could move toward selfsufficiency in food if they chose to, there is one major developed nation that seems chronically unable to do so: the Soviet Union. One problem is nature. With two-thirds of the country's prime crop land lying north of the 49th Parallel, Soviet harvests are plagued with some of the world's worst weather. But weather is only one problem; politics is another. The Soviets' sociajist system provides bad planning and few incentives. President Leonid Brezhnev has reluctantly admitted as much by quietly giving freer rein ^to rural citizens willing to plant backyard gardens and— sell their produce at a profit. Such "free enterprise" inside the Soviet Union uses only about one percent of the land under cultivation, but according to the Russian economics journal Ekonomicheskaya Gazeta, these entrepreneurs in 1980 contributed 31 percent of Russia's meat production, 30 percent of milk, 32 percent of eggs, 35 percent of vegetables, 64 percent of potatoes, and 58 percent of fruits and berries. In the United States, some six million farmers grow enough food to feed the country and a goodly share of the world besides. By contrast, 26.4-million Soviet citizens work the land and yet their government must import food. So, beginning in 1972, Soviet buyers entered the U.S. marketplace and, through a series of quiet orders with ^eparatecouipaiiies, bought up moretfianone^uarteroT the U.S. export grain crop. Soviet agents elsewhere were also purchasing large shares of oiher nations' harvests in all, about 30 million metric tons of the world's food supply that year. For American consumers the repercussions of this Soviet buccaneering were painful; the price of bread skyrocketed, as did the prices of meat, eggs, milk, poultry, and other foods derived from grain-fed livestock and poultry. But what was painful for Americans was fatal elsewhere in the world. With grain suddenly in short supply, famine loomed. In all, almost two million men, women and children in the poorer nations of the world are thought to h^ve died of starvation. Most Americans fail to see the similarity between the amber waves of grain stretching across our nation's heartland and the oil flowing from Saudi wells. We tend to think of abundant food as a perpetually renewable resource. We are wrong. Our food, like the Suadis' oil, could someday run out. Both are the product of limited and priceless natural deposits that, once exhausted, will be gone for good. For example, one Department of Agriculture surveys estimates that loss of topsoil at present rates, combined with other factors, will reduce American farm yields by eight percent in 50 years unless measures are taken to restore and conserve topsoil. Most farmers know this. But at present iocome, writes Lester Brown, President of the WorldWatch Institute, it would cost the average farmer three times more to conserve his topsoil than he could recover in enhanced harvests by taking those measures. His choice, says Brown, is between going broke now, by expending huge sums to restore his topsoil, or going broke years from now when his soil is depleted and can no longer produce crops. These and other facts point to a surprising conclusion: the United States is selling its grain at less than its real long-term cost. We are expending finite natural deposits In^rder to pump grain from our crop lands as fasl^s^ possible, without figuring the cost of these deposits into the price we get. ^ What if the major food-producing nations could be persuaded to imitate OPEC and form a FOPEC ~ an Organization of Food Producing and Exporting Countries that would agree to demand more dollars for fewer bushels of „grain? Although a FOPEC would cause world grain prices to rise temporarily, it also would provide a powerful stimulus to other u'ations to grow more of their own food, and eventually, to assert their food independence. And thus, its long-term effect would be to produce much more food in the world ~ and to push back the threat of famine for all peoples. As one of President Reagan's favorite aphorisms says, "If you give a man a fish, you will feed him for a day. If you teach a man how to fish, you feed him for a lifetime." Should we consider using food as a weapon? It is a power that destiny has put into our hands. Rather than reject it, we must consider the best and wisest ways to use this power to prompt development in other nations, to encourage cooperation, to discourage aggression. As Thomas Jefferson envisioned, by wise use of the power to trade what we have been blessed with, we may yet find in food a substitute for the sword and a means to keep peace an the worlds • —t Your Vieui HenderMn Home News, Henderton, Nevada Page 5 Thursday, May 20,1982 ; How About the Swimmers? Dear Mr. Editor, I just finished reading Tuesday's Home News. My, but you covered the baseball victory of Basic High School well!! One of your reporters must have been there ... and didn't have to copy what was said in the Review Journal. I'm proud of the team also. They are wonderf\il, plucky kids: But believe me, you can't imagine how hurt and disappointed some young Basic High School students are over all this hoopla. There was no reporter, no bands, no parties, no police escorts into town, etc., given to those Aqua Wolves ... the boys Swimming Team who brought home Just as great a victory to Henderson and Basic High School as the Basc;ball Team. The swim Wastewter Charges Unfair N'*?5^n oooo oooo I have begun to wonder why it is that every time we live in a fool's world of things finally straightening out for us, that BINGO ... here is another raise in utilities, be it water, electric, gas, garbage, or now the decision to impose a new waste-water fee. Wouldn't it be more feasible, to implement a "user's" fee, (out of respect for 'Social Change, The Law And The Common Good' by Officer Robert Lindsey The title covers a broad area of human affairs. Perhaps there has never, in the history of this country, rjbeen a time when so many people in government and in the community generally have been so much concerned about the relationship of one group of citizens to another. Nor has there probably ever been a time when so much reliance has been placed upon the legal system to effect the kind of change that is desired. The situation is a particularly difficult one for governmental agencies which find themselves caught between those who desire change and those who resist change. And, of all the governmental agencies, perhaps the police are in the least enviable position, because we must often deal quickly with unanticipated crises which arise. Even when there are no crises, police still come in contact more frequently representative of government. As a consequence, many citizens know their government and its policies primarily through the practices of individual police officers whom they meet on a day to day basis. There seems little doubt that the way police conduct themselves will have a major impact upon social change and common good. Knowing this, what should the policy of police be? It is sometimes said that all police need to do is remain neutral. But it may not be apparent what neutrality is, when confronted with a blulldozer moving ahead and a human being lying in its path to stop it. The objective of neutrality seems clearly to be a proper one, but not easy to define in particular circumstances. If, for example, certain types of assaults are viewed as less serious by one segment of the community than by another segment, does neutrality require equally strict enforcement throughout the entire community, or may enforcement remain neutral and at the same time with people, than any other reflect difl'erences in group attitude? It is also said that all police need to do is to enforce the law fully and fearlessly, leaving it to other governmental agencies to decide whether policies should be continued or changed. The objective of full enforcement of the criminal law is one of the traditions of the American system of government. This is probably what is meant when we say, with pride, that ours is a government of law and not of men. But the objectives of full enforcement, if taken literally, is not possible, and even if it were possible, it would result in a clearly intolerable situation. Whatever we say about our traditions, we do not in fact want an automatic mechanical enforcement of our criminal law. Rather we want an intelligent and responslble^exercise otdis— cretion in the development and implementation of a law enforcement policy which is effective and consistent with the requirements of law, and with the traditions of a democratic society. These are objectives dif•ficult to achieve. They are Beating IRS, Washington Style: Official Takes Large Deduction Americans should all be very happy for U.S. Attorney General William French Smith. Last year he invested $16,500 in an oil drilling venture and this year he put in for a $66,000 deduction on his income tax. The Growing Shortage of Scientists and Engineers Sputnik Revisited The Soviet Union launched its tiny Sputnik satellite in October, 1957, and coincidentally set off a great furor in the United States over the number of scientists and engineers we might be able to press into our lagging space program. The furor caused curricula to be rewritten at every level of education and heavy pressure on educators to increase exposure to mathematics and science. Our eventual triumphs in space attest to the success of that emphasis. Now we seem once again to have outrun our capability to privide qualified people to fill the engineering and scientific ranks in industry and national defense. While the number of new engineers and scientists produced by our colleges has remained high, our dependency on advanced technology has outstripped it by leaps and bounds. Almost half of our doctorallevel students in these fields are f^om foreign countries, as are 40 percent of the masters-level students and eight percent of the bachelor's degree candidates. When they graduate, they take their skills home with them where they become real or potential competitors. As faras our own potential scientists are concerned, there has been a substantial drop in the number of young people taking the proper courses to prepare for study in these fields. Only onesixth of our high school graduates take any math or science courses after their tenth-grade year. Starting salaries for government service today average about $7,000 per year less than in industry. And yet the services are under constant scrutiny by Congress, the press and the public as they se,arch for real or imagined mismanagement of weapons-related programs. The Sputnik panic is forgotten. The education of people we need to cope with blossoming reliance on science is falling short of the demand. We must take a new, hard look at our schools, at our ability to retain talented teachers indeed, at our whole commitment to technical excellence if we are to revitalize our educational base and reestablish the technological preeminence our national security demands. Rezoning Our thanks and apprecia tion to all who M'orked sol hard. Green Valley cer tainly has no need for rezon> ing in its residential area. Beverly & Earl Bal The deduction is four times the amount of the in"vestment and two times the amount allowed by an Internal Revenue Service ruling. Not bad. Yet, somehow, one suspects that most Americans are not very happy with this news. Especially those millions who are unable to get huge tax breaks, or to get advice from attorneys on how to beat the IRS. -For tbatis^whatSmith did, according to records obtained by the Washington Post. Ordinarily, oil and gas partnerships result in firstyear deductions of about double the initial investment. Also, a 1980 IRS ruling would limit Smith's tax break to about that amount. But not satisfied with this, it seems Smith and 34 partners followed the advice of a Los Angeles law firm to take even more. The law-iixuLxeportedly said Smith might win a court case on the extra-large deduction, although "there" are risks and uncertainties on a number of tax issues." Well, to hell with the risks; Anyone wishing to write a letter to the editor may do so bv addressing to: Editor, Henderson HomeNews, Box 815, Henderson, Nevada 89015. Looking Back By Loma Kestersoa 1952 30 Years Ago t%e purchase plan of the Townsite homes and the Henderson Home News £ support of the plan was §.,blasted on the fVont pages of the newspaper by people who lived in Townsite Homes but were not eligible to purchase them. Mrs. Elmer Riggins installed new officers for the Basic High School PTA. ~ Frank Plasha, assistant manager of industrial relations at Timet, was named speaker for the commencement exercises for Basic High School's 42 seniors. — Hershel Trumbo^,wa8 elected president of the Chamber of Commerce. Estes McDoniel resigned as football coach and became athletic director for the high school. 1962 20 Years Ago Dick Empson and his baseball team beat Las Vegas and was looking for a conference title. Vicki Smith was at Scripps College. -Sandra Detomasi was at Arizona State University. Acting Mayor Frank Morrell leveled charges against Developer Harry Polk saying Mayor Bill Byrne had malfeasance of office when be failed to charge hook-up fees for Trailer Estates. A gas war in the city brought gasoline prices to 24 cents a gallon. Frank Schreck was attending Yale University. 19*72 Ten Years Ago Former City Councilman and well-known Realtor, Frank Morrell passed away. Police Officer John Dorsey was suspended. The city was to purchase the junior high school (civic center) for $500,000. L team has swum to victory for eight (yes, 8) consecutive years to be Zone Champions and are Nevada's 1982 State Swimming Champions. Have you (or for that matter, any baseball player, track star or football star) ever swam the length of the Lot-in Williams Pool 20 times inji^^inutes? You can bet not. And many young Henderson swimmers do it every day in practice and competition. They swim every day for hours. IVJi no wonder that several parents here deliberately moved to Las Vegas so their swimmers could get some recognition. I'm afraid there will be some less than enthusiastic "alumni" supporters in years to come. Too bad. Name withheld reader's familiar with the street-talk, I would not attempt using a more familiar "head-tax"), instead of household tax-rate? Why I suggest this, is because there are just two of us living in this home, yet ... within a stones throw of us, is a house that is supposed to be a residence, it is used by couples, and singles on a rotating basis throughout doubly difficult during a period of rapid social change. To some extent, responsibility for the development of law enforcement policy at the local level falls upon mayors and other officials, trial courts and prosecutors. But it is apparent that much is left to the police agency. In a period of rapid social change, it Is important to ask how an officer can steer a course of neutrality if he cannot rely upon the principle of full enforcement of the law against all citizens, regardless of social or racial status? The difficulty of the task makes it tempting for police to pretend that the problem does not exist, or that the responsibility is not ours, a common and understandable public attitude of many police officials today. But I have been long convlnce d that police agencies^ the week, and on weekends, a' community gathering place for friends, and friends of friends, Bar-BQulng, drinking, who's cans, and empties wind up in a pile of glass to rip the daylights out of tires. More than once, I've been out with my broom and dustpan, cleaning up their messes. I hope that this is being taken in the manner in which it is meant. I was under the impression when purchasing our house, that the owners were not to sublease, without the approval of the Mortgage company. Frankly, with the turn-over of the aforementioned neighbors, it would even put the computers of Howard Johnson's on overtime, to keep up with the turnover. Sincerely, Elizabeth M. Martin Thanks For health Fair Editor: I would like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for your help in presenting Health Fair '82 to the community of our area. During the past twelve month period, over 9,000 Southern Nevada residents have utilized the Health Promotion and Health Education services offered by the Health Fair Week Program. This can be directly attributed to the cooperation of many community agnecies who have come together to give Nevadans a new outlook on health awareness. By increasing this awareness, we hope that our joint efforts will have a long term effect on our community's health status and life expectancy. On behalf of myself, the National Health Screening Council for Volunteer Organizations, and the thousands of people in Las Vegaswhom you have helped. Thank You. Sincerely, Curt B. Fenski Curt B. Fenski NHSCVO Private Tuition Tax Credits The nation now has a legal no and a legal yes on tax credits for parents who place their children in private schools. The First U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Rhode Island acted un8th U.S. Circuit Court is correct in finding these connections "remote and incidental." The second argument is not entirely without merit. Tax credits would encourage parents to send more have as important, perhaps more important social, pollcymaklng responsibility as many local, state or federal administrative agencies. And the common denial by police of this fact has had an adverse effect upon police themselves, and upon the communities which we serve. let's get the dough. It must be this that so endears some officials to the American public: their willingness to stretch the law as far as it will bend ~ and beyond for personal gain. It must be this that gives Americans such an overwhelming trust in their officials, a belief that they will serve the public unselfishly from their lofty positions of knowledge and insight It must be this. Isn't it? Nevada State Journal constitutionally when it granted state Income tax credits for private schooling. Conversely, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Minnesota was within its rights to pass a similiar law. Obviously, the issue will have to be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. And, if President Reagan gets his say, it will also have to decide on the constitutionality of a national income tax credit because the president is urging Congress to adopt just such a law. In the meantime, the public Is free to debate the Issue, and, indeed, is doing so fairly vigorously. Basi cally, the arguments againsi tax credits are two: first, the already mentioned belief that the tax credits would -Violate^ the c onstltutional separation of church and state; and, second, the fear that tax credits would greatly weaken the public school system. Those who apply the Constitution to this matter seem to be making a tenuous connection. In the first place,^ not all private schools have a religious base, so the constitutional question does not apply to them at all. But even for the religious schools, it is difficult to see how the tax credits violate the Constitution. The separation of church and state has two basic purposes: to protect religions ft-om state persecution, and to prevent any one religion from controlling the government Tax credits would not have an effect In either dlrecton. The children to private schootsT thus removing some of those children whose parents are most supportive of the educational system. But tax credits will not destroy the public schools. For one thing, not all the students who depart will be the brighter, more disciplined youngsters. Parents also have been known to place troubled children in private schools in the hope that stricter discipline will reform their anti-social, antieducation attitudes. Nor will the public schools necessarily lose large amounts of funds, even if these tax credits are extended to the state level. Other taxes will still be paid; and these funds can still be channeled into the school system if need be. "The majorfactor to be ^nsidered is wliefher par=~ ents who prefer private schools should be doubly penalized by having to help fund both private and public t ools at the same time, hout any tax relief The answer to that is no. On balance. Congress should go along with President Reagan and approve federal tax credits for all private school tuition, whether these schools be religious or nonsectarian. Nevada has no state income tax, but might consider permitting a similar tuition credit on property tax. Then the Supreme Court should uphold the Bth Circuit Court thereby solidly affirming the right of the states and the nation to grant these credits.

PAGE 5

Yieuipoinl HENDERSON IHt tOMMI MM s Mosr^rn Page 4 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, Nay 20,1982 PUBLISHER MIKE O'CALLAGHAN EDITOR LORNA K E8TER80N CIRCULATION 564-1881 WeCanWn The two recent state championships won by Basic High School, show that we can win. Year after year, Henderson parents and sports fans have sat through countless games with never a winning te^. Still the fans kept coming -hoping that each year would bring success. Local people are known for their support of their young people and even though they didn't win the people showed up for support. This year the Wolves swim team took state, and justjJast week the high school baseball team was named the state champion. Basic High School has always been the "little school" in the Triple A league, but as the school grows it should take its share of wins in the county. f Who Speaks For The People? Little May Be Better The boys on the baseball team, we believe, have an advantage in that they have played together since they were in little leagues. They come from a small-tight-knit community where nearly everyone knows each other. In what other community would 300 people stay up until 1:30 a.m. to welcome home the team from the state championship? Basic has that type of community support that it should draw on. .. Some observers believe that the turn-around in the sports program came when Rich Whitehead came in as football coach. They see a new enthusiasm from the young people, less griping and less problems. We hope the football program also improves for the next year with the new encouragement of two state championships. Basic could set a national record of consecutive losses in football if they continue to lose next year. By Richard Cohen WASHINGTON Comes now before the Supreme Court of the United States the honorable William T. Coleman, former secretary of transportation, noted lawyer and now something very special: a friend of the court. He is appearing in the case of Bob Jones University et al vs. the decency and common sense of the United States of America and he has been summoned by the Court because the government will not do its job. It has quit. Rkiiard Cohen Congratulations We congratulate the baseball team for setting an example for the entife school and especially the sports program. Coach Gary Chaires who has been at Basic for eight years, says he has a "great bunch of kids" and there have been no discipline problems. Tom Crine has assisted coaching the 17 youths on the baseball team. We hope the enthusiasm of the baseball team rubs off in all activities of the school for it shows that we can win. It has quit taking the side of the poor and it has quit taking the side of the oppressed. It has quit being the champion of minorities and women and workers and even passengers in passenger cars. Its friends are the rich andthe powerful, the white and the male, and when it comes to passenger safety, either the people who make cars or maybe the members of the American Association of Plastic Surgeons. In the case at hand, the government has quit insisting that private schools that discriminate on the basis of race are not eligible for tax exemptions. This was the position of the Nixon, Ford, Carter and, it was assumed, Reagan administrations. It was to some consternation, not to mention a great deal of confusion, that the administration announced ithad a new policy. In fact, for a while it had a new policy every week. What it came down to, though, was that the administration was no longer willing to contest the issue with Bob Jones University and other schools that had taken the government to court. So here we were at the Supreme Court where on one side stood the racist institutions and on the other side ... Well, there was no other side. The government would not defend the victory it had won in the lower courts. If racist schools wanted tax (exemptions, they either ought to have them or Congress shle who need it the most. By Lowell Ponte With control of over 57 percent of the world's exportable grain, the United States is the Saudi Arabia of food. Only 8 of the world's 173 nations -the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, South Africa, France, and Thailand consistently produce significantly more food than they consume. In theory, if the United States chose to beat its plowshares into swords, its "food weapon" would be awesome. On January 4, 1980, the United States used food as a weapon for the first time ~ against the Soviet Union. Less than two weeks before, Soviet troops had invaded Afghanistan. Such aggression against an independent nation would not be allowed "with impunity," President Jimmy Carter declared. The President's response: an —embargo on grain sales to the Soviet Unions On April 24,1981, President Reagan lifted the embargo. "From the farmer's point of view, the Soviet embargo was an utter disaster," says Secretary of Agriculture John R. Block. Yet Block does believe'that the United States should be ready and willing *to use food as a weapon. "Over the next twenty years," he has said, "food can be the greatest weapon we have." Those who argue that the United States can by itself wield a "foo(^ weapon" much like OPEC's "oil weapon" tend to forget certain facts. Few nations of the world can simply plant an oil derrick and hit oil. But virtually all nations can plant seeds and produce food. While many countries could move toward selfsufficiency in food if they chose to, there is one major developed nation that seems chronically unable to do so: the Soviet Union. One problem is nature. With two-thirds of the country's prime crop land lying north of the 49th Parallel, Soviet harvests are plagued with some of the world's worst weather. But weather is only one problem; politics is another. The Soviets' sociajist system provides bad planning and few incentives. President Leonid Brezhnev has reluctantly admitted as much by quietly giving freer rein ^to rural citizens willing to plant backyard gardens and— sell their produce at a profit. Such "free enterprise" inside the Soviet Union uses only about one percent of the land under cultivation, but according to the Russian economics journal Ekonomicheskaya Gazeta, these entrepreneurs in 1980 contributed 31 percent of Russia's meat production, 30 percent of milk, 32 percent of eggs, 35 percent of vegetables, 64 percent of potatoes, and 58 percent of fruits and berries. In the United States, some six million farmers grow enough food to feed the country and a goodly share of the world besides. By contrast, 26.4-million Soviet citizens work the land and yet their government must import food. So, beginning in 1972, Soviet buyers entered the U.S. marketplace and, through a series of quiet orders with ^eparatecouipaiiies, bought up moretfianone^uarteroT the U.S. export grain crop. Soviet agents elsewhere were also purchasing large shares of oiher nations' harvests in all, about 30 million metric tons of the world's food supply that year. For American consumers the repercussions of this Soviet buccaneering were painful; the price of bread skyrocketed, as did the prices of meat, eggs, milk, poultry, and other foods derived from grain-fed livestock and poultry. But what was painful for Americans was fatal elsewhere in the world. With grain suddenly in short supply, famine loomed. In all, almost two million men, women and children in the poorer nations of the world are thought to h^ve died of starvation. Most Americans fail to see the similarity between the amber waves of grain stretching across our nation's heartland and the oil flowing from Saudi wells. We tend to think of abundant food as a perpetually renewable resource. We are wrong. Our food, like the Suadis' oil, could someday run out. Both are the product of limited and priceless natural deposits that, once exhausted, will be gone for good. For example, one Department of Agriculture surveys estimates that loss of topsoil at present rates, combined with other factors, will reduce American farm yields by eight percent in 50 years unless measures are taken to restore and conserve topsoil. Most farmers know this. But at present iocome, writes Lester Brown, President of the WorldWatch Institute, it would cost the average farmer three times more to conserve his topsoil than he could recover in enhanced harvests by taking those measures. His choice, says Brown, is between going broke now, by expending huge sums to restore his topsoil, or going broke years from now when his soil is depleted and can no longer produce crops. These and other facts point to a surprising conclusion: the United States is selling its grain at less than its real long-term cost. We are expending finite natural deposits In^rder to pump grain from our crop lands as fasl^s^ possible, without figuring the cost of these deposits into the price we get. ^ What if the major food-producing nations could be persuaded to imitate OPEC and form a FOPEC ~ an Organization of Food Producing and Exporting Countries that would agree to demand more dollars for fewer bushels of „grain? Although a FOPEC would cause world grain prices to rise temporarily, it also would provide a powerful stimulus to other u'ations to grow more of their own food, and eventually, to assert their food independence. And thus, its long-term effect would be to produce much more food in the world ~ and to push back the threat of famine for all peoples. As one of President Reagan's favorite aphorisms says, "If you give a man a fish, you will feed him for a day. If you teach a man how to fish, you feed him for a lifetime." Should we consider using food as a weapon? It is a power that destiny has put into our hands. Rather than reject it, we must consider the best and wisest ways to use this power to prompt development in other nations, to encourage cooperation, to discourage aggression. As Thomas Jefferson envisioned, by wise use of the power to trade what we have been blessed with, we may yet find in food a substitute for the sword and a means to keep peace an the worlds • —t Your Vieui HenderMn Home News, Henderton, Nevada Page 5 Thursday, May 20,1982 ; How About the Swimmers? Dear Mr. Editor, I just finished reading Tuesday's Home News. My, but you covered the baseball victory of Basic High School well!! One of your reporters must have been there ... and didn't have to copy what was said in the Review Journal. I'm proud of the team also. They are wonderf\il, plucky kids: But believe me, you can't imagine how hurt and disappointed some young Basic High School students are over all this hoopla. There was no reporter, no bands, no parties, no police escorts into town, etc., given to those Aqua Wolves ... the boys Swimming Team who brought home Just as great a victory to Henderson and Basic High School as the Basc;ball Team. The swim Wastewter Charges Unfair N'*?5^n oooo oooo I have begun to wonder why it is that every time we live in a fool's world of things finally straightening out for us, that BINGO ... here is another raise in utilities, be it water, electric, gas, garbage, or now the decision to impose a new waste-water fee. Wouldn't it be more feasible, to implement a "user's" fee, (out of respect for 'Social Change, The Law And The Common Good' by Officer Robert Lindsey The title covers a broad area of human affairs. Perhaps there has never, in the history of this country, rjbeen a time when so many people in government and in the community generally have been so much concerned about the relationship of one group of citizens to another. Nor has there probably ever been a time when so much reliance has been placed upon the legal system to effect the kind of change that is desired. The situation is a particularly difficult one for governmental agencies which find themselves caught between those who desire change and those who resist change. And, of all the governmental agencies, perhaps the police are in the least enviable position, because we must often deal quickly with unanticipated crises which arise. Even when there are no crises, police still come in contact more frequently representative of government. As a consequence, many citizens know their government and its policies primarily through the practices of individual police officers whom they meet on a day to day basis. There seems little doubt that the way police conduct themselves will have a major impact upon social change and common good. Knowing this, what should the policy of police be? It is sometimes said that all police need to do is remain neutral. But it may not be apparent what neutrality is, when confronted with a blulldozer moving ahead and a human being lying in its path to stop it. The objective of neutrality seems clearly to be a proper one, but not easy to define in particular circumstances. If, for example, certain types of assaults are viewed as less serious by one segment of the community than by another segment, does neutrality require equally strict enforcement throughout the entire community, or may enforcement remain neutral and at the same time with people, than any other reflect difl'erences in group attitude? It is also said that all police need to do is to enforce the law fully and fearlessly, leaving it to other governmental agencies to decide whether policies should be continued or changed. The objective of full enforcement of the criminal law is one of the traditions of the American system of government. This is probably what is meant when we say, with pride, that ours is a government of law and not of men. But the objectives of full enforcement, if taken literally, is not possible, and even if it were possible, it would result in a clearly intolerable situation. Whatever we say about our traditions, we do not in fact want an automatic mechanical enforcement of our criminal law. Rather we want an intelligent and responslble^exercise otdis— cretion in the development and implementation of a law enforcement policy which is effective and consistent with the requirements of law, and with the traditions of a democratic society. These are objectives dif•ficult to achieve. They are Beating IRS, Washington Style: Official Takes Large Deduction Americans should all be very happy for U.S. Attorney General William French Smith. Last year he invested $16,500 in an oil drilling venture and this year he put in for a $66,000 deduction on his income tax. The Growing Shortage of Scientists and Engineers Sputnik Revisited The Soviet Union launched its tiny Sputnik satellite in October, 1957, and coincidentally set off a great furor in the United States over the number of scientists and engineers we might be able to press into our lagging space program. The furor caused curricula to be rewritten at every level of education and heavy pressure on educators to increase exposure to mathematics and science. Our eventual triumphs in space attest to the success of that emphasis. Now we seem once again to have outrun our capability to privide qualified people to fill the engineering and scientific ranks in industry and national defense. While the number of new engineers and scientists produced by our colleges has remained high, our dependency on advanced technology has outstripped it by leaps and bounds. Almost half of our doctorallevel students in these fields are f^om foreign countries, as are 40 percent of the masters-level students and eight percent of the bachelor's degree candidates. When they graduate, they take their skills home with them where they become real or potential competitors. As faras our own potential scientists are concerned, there has been a substantial drop in the number of young people taking the proper courses to prepare for study in these fields. Only onesixth of our high school graduates take any math or science courses after their tenth-grade year. Starting salaries for government service today average about $7,000 per year less than in industry. And yet the services are under constant scrutiny by Congress, the press and the public as they se,arch for real or imagined mismanagement of weapons-related programs. The Sputnik panic is forgotten. The education of people we need to cope with blossoming reliance on science is falling short of the demand. We must take a new, hard look at our schools, at our ability to retain talented teachers indeed, at our whole commitment to technical excellence if we are to revitalize our educational base and reestablish the technological preeminence our national security demands. Rezoning Our thanks and apprecia tion to all who M'orked sol hard. Green Valley cer tainly has no need for rezon> ing in its residential area. Beverly & Earl Bal The deduction is four times the amount of the in"vestment and two times the amount allowed by an Internal Revenue Service ruling. Not bad. Yet, somehow, one suspects that most Americans are not very happy with this news. Especially those millions who are unable to get huge tax breaks, or to get advice from attorneys on how to beat the IRS. -For tbatis^whatSmith did, according to records obtained by the Washington Post. Ordinarily, oil and gas partnerships result in firstyear deductions of about double the initial investment. Also, a 1980 IRS ruling would limit Smith's tax break to about that amount. But not satisfied with this, it seems Smith and 34 partners followed the advice of a Los Angeles law firm to take even more. The law-iixuLxeportedly said Smith might win a court case on the extra-large deduction, although "there" are risks and uncertainties on a number of tax issues." Well, to hell with the risks; Anyone wishing to write a letter to the editor may do so bv addressing to: Editor, Henderson HomeNews, Box 815, Henderson, Nevada 89015. Looking Back By Loma Kestersoa 1952 30 Years Ago t%e purchase plan of the Townsite homes and the Henderson Home News £ support of the plan was §.,blasted on the fVont pages of the newspaper by people who lived in Townsite Homes but were not eligible to purchase them. Mrs. Elmer Riggins installed new officers for the Basic High School PTA. ~ Frank Plasha, assistant manager of industrial relations at Timet, was named speaker for the commencement exercises for Basic High School's 42 seniors. — Hershel Trumbo^,wa8 elected president of the Chamber of Commerce. Estes McDoniel resigned as football coach and became athletic director for the high school. 1962 20 Years Ago Dick Empson and his baseball team beat Las Vegas and was looking for a conference title. Vicki Smith was at Scripps College. -Sandra Detomasi was at Arizona State University. Acting Mayor Frank Morrell leveled charges against Developer Harry Polk saying Mayor Bill Byrne had malfeasance of office when be failed to charge hook-up fees for Trailer Estates. A gas war in the city brought gasoline prices to 24 cents a gallon. Frank Schreck was attending Yale University. 19*72 Ten Years Ago Former City Councilman and well-known Realtor, Frank Morrell passed away. Police Officer John Dorsey was suspended. The city was to purchase the junior high school (civic center) for $500,000. L team has swum to victory for eight (yes, 8) consecutive years to be Zone Champions and are Nevada's 1982 State Swimming Champions. Have you (or for that matter, any baseball player, track star or football star) ever swam the length of the Lot-in Williams Pool 20 times inji^^inutes? You can bet not. And many young Henderson swimmers do it every day in practice and competition. They swim every day for hours. IVJi no wonder that several parents here deliberately moved to Las Vegas so their swimmers could get some recognition. I'm afraid there will be some less than enthusiastic "alumni" supporters in years to come. Too bad. Name withheld reader's familiar with the street-talk, I would not attempt using a more familiar "head-tax"), instead of household tax-rate? Why I suggest this, is because there are just two of us living in this home, yet ... within a stones throw of us, is a house that is supposed to be a residence, it is used by couples, and singles on a rotating basis throughout doubly difficult during a period of rapid social change. To some extent, responsibility for the development of law enforcement policy at the local level falls upon mayors and other officials, trial courts and prosecutors. But it is apparent that much is left to the police agency. In a period of rapid social change, it Is important to ask how an officer can steer a course of neutrality if he cannot rely upon the principle of full enforcement of the law against all citizens, regardless of social or racial status? The difficulty of the task makes it tempting for police to pretend that the problem does not exist, or that the responsibility is not ours, a common and understandable public attitude of many police officials today. But I have been long convlnce d that police agencies^ the week, and on weekends, a' community gathering place for friends, and friends of friends, Bar-BQulng, drinking, who's cans, and empties wind up in a pile of glass to rip the daylights out of tires. More than once, I've been out with my broom and dustpan, cleaning up their messes. I hope that this is being taken in the manner in which it is meant. I was under the impression when purchasing our house, that the owners were not to sublease, without the approval of the Mortgage company. Frankly, with the turn-over of the aforementioned neighbors, it would even put the computers of Howard Johnson's on overtime, to keep up with the turnover. Sincerely, Elizabeth M. Martin Thanks For health Fair Editor: I would like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for your help in presenting Health Fair '82 to the community of our area. During the past twelve month period, over 9,000 Southern Nevada residents have utilized the Health Promotion and Health Education services offered by the Health Fair Week Program. This can be directly attributed to the cooperation of many community agnecies who have come together to give Nevadans a new outlook on health awareness. By increasing this awareness, we hope that our joint efforts will have a long term effect on our community's health status and life expectancy. On behalf of myself, the National Health Screening Council for Volunteer Organizations, and the thousands of people in Las Vegaswhom you have helped. Thank You. Sincerely, Curt B. Fenski Curt B. Fenski NHSCVO Private Tuition Tax Credits The nation now has a legal no and a legal yes on tax credits for parents who place their children in private schools. The First U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Rhode Island acted un8th U.S. Circuit Court is correct in finding these connections "remote and incidental." The second argument is not entirely without merit. Tax credits would encourage parents to send more have as important, perhaps more important social, pollcymaklng responsibility as many local, state or federal administrative agencies. And the common denial by police of this fact has had an adverse effect upon police themselves, and upon the communities which we serve. let's get the dough. It must be this that so endears some officials to the American public: their willingness to stretch the law as far as it will bend ~ and beyond for personal gain. It must be this that gives Americans such an overwhelming trust in their officials, a belief that they will serve the public unselfishly from their lofty positions of knowledge and insight It must be this. Isn't it? Nevada State Journal constitutionally when it granted state Income tax credits for private schooling. Conversely, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Minnesota was within its rights to pass a similiar law. Obviously, the issue will have to be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. And, if President Reagan gets his say, it will also have to decide on the constitutionality of a national income tax credit because the president is urging Congress to adopt just such a law. In the meantime, the public Is free to debate the Issue, and, indeed, is doing so fairly vigorously. Basi cally, the arguments againsi tax credits are two: first, the already mentioned belief that the tax credits would -Violate^ the c onstltutional separation of church and state; and, second, the fear that tax credits would greatly weaken the public school system. Those who apply the Constitution to this matter seem to be making a tenuous connection. In the first place,^ not all private schools have a religious base, so the constitutional question does not apply to them at all. But even for the religious schools, it is difficult to see how the tax credits violate the Constitution. The separation of church and state has two basic purposes: to protect religions ft-om state persecution, and to prevent any one religion from controlling the government Tax credits would not have an effect In either dlrecton. The children to private schootsT thus removing some of those children whose parents are most supportive of the educational system. But tax credits will not destroy the public schools. For one thing, not all the students who depart will be the brighter, more disciplined youngsters. Parents also have been known to place troubled children in private schools in the hope that stricter discipline will reform their anti-social, antieducation attitudes. Nor will the public schools necessarily lose large amounts of funds, even if these tax credits are extended to the state level. Other taxes will still be paid; and these funds can still be channeled into the school system if need be. "The majorfactor to be ^nsidered is wliefher par=~ ents who prefer private schools should be doubly penalized by having to help fund both private and public t ools at the same time, hout any tax relief The answer to that is no. On balance. Congress should go along with President Reagan and approve federal tax credits for all private school tuition, whether these schools be religious or nonsectarian. Nevada has no state income tax, but might consider permitting a similar tuition credit on property tax. Then the Supreme Court should uphold the Bth Circuit Court thereby solidly affirming the right of the states and the nation to grant these credits.

PAGE 6

Page 6 Henderson Home News, Henderson. Nevada Thursday, May 20,1982 Thursday, May 20,1982 (VFW Installs New Officers BUDDY POPPY SALE..CailM Whartoa, Buddy Poppy QuMii of VFW Pwt 3848, seOa the tint py to HendonoB Md^yorUKoy Zike aa the sale opened. BfayorilgBad proclamation paSSd dfiaignaiing May M throogh 31 Baddy Poppy Sale diM. From left, Ethel PfetfTer, AuzUhury rhalmwn, Oiailee Elked Poet Chalnnan, ZIke and I^dea MarthMt, pieeldent of Ladlei Auilllaiy. A joint installation of officers for the 1982-83 year was held last Friday at the new post home of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States and it's Ladies Auxiliary. Outgoing Post Commander, Marty Martinez and Outgoing Auxiliary President, Lydia Martinez, together with the members have been conducting a rigid renovation and cleaning of the building located at the corner of Basic Road and Lake Mead Drive which was recently purchased for the VFW Post Home. State Junior Vice President, Dell Hummer, was the installing officer for the ladies auxiliary and the following were installed into office. Alice Wagner, President^ Delores Darrah, Sr. Vice (, President; Linnie Davis, Jr. Vice President; Ethel Pfeiffer, Chaplain; Pearl Froman. Treasurer; Mary Greenhalgh, Conductress; Thirza Jones, Guard; three year Trustee, Lydia Martinez; two-year Trustee, Evelyn Mitchell; one year Trustee and Patriotic Instructor, Julie Elkie; Flag Bearer, Marcella Fruth; and Color Bearer, Cleo Yeager. Past Department Commander, Charles Elkie installed the men of the Post. The new incoming Commander is Leonard Fruth. Serving with him are, Richard Yeager, Sr. Vice Commander; Stanley Martinez, Jr. Vice Commander; Gilbert Medina, Chaplain; Joel Zander, Quartermaster; Charles Elkie, Adjutant; Homer Englestead, Post Advocated; James Childers, Surgeon; and Trustees, Marty Martinez, Al Romero, and Hank Pfeiffer. Guests at the installation function were District 5 Auxiliary President, Doris Shaefer and District 5 Treasurer, Irene Ackerman, Past State Commander and Auxiliary President, Woody and Mickey Rainbolt, all of Las Vegas and North Las Vegas. Out of state guests were the son and daughter of Ethel and Hank Pfeiffer and Harvery Pfeiffer was the winner of the quilt raf-fle. The raffle brought in funds for the Voice of Democracy, State Scholarship program and the Cancer Aid and Research projects of the auxiliary. Plans are going forward to further enhance the post home building and to continue the work on the special programs of the V.F.W. and the Auxiliary to foster pattiotism, safety in the home and community, service to our veterans in the hospitals and their families in the community, the VFW Natioal Home in Eaton Rapids, Michigan which is for the widow and orphans of deceased or disabled veterans, and other community activities to make our country a better place to live in. Currently, they are^ working on the Buddy" Poppy Drive for May 24 through 31, funds from which go to help veteran families in our community and in the veteran's hospital in Reno, and the veterans at the Outpatient Clinic in Las Vegas. By Edna Deardoff Senior Citizen Center Hem Rooms 6 and 7, Civic Center HPRD Presents Free JAZZ IN THE PARK What a picnic we had on Sat. sponsored by SENIORS FOR SENIORS! Wonderful FoodI Beautiful weather!. Happy Seniors! Mil them all together and you have a DAY to remember! Our fun Day on last Thursday, was well attended and enjoyed by Jill. The lucky Bingo Winners were: JCaty Kelly, Lillian McFexran. Pauline Muace, Jot Santisteven. Frank Thompson, Anne Fletfher, Floyd Hetrick. Boti Ro^s, Wanda Schimbeck, Joanne Smith, and Edith Hetrick. Joanne Smith was. the Binffo Caller, assisted by Joe Garcia. We thank you. Canasta followed and refreshments provided by Ken Holt wete served. Joe. .Garcia was the recipient of the door prize. On Thursday, May 20th at 11 AM, Rex Newell from the Fire Dept. will give a presentation on "Emergency Alert for Seniors". He will bring the Emergency Vehicle so. that the Seniors will have a chance to see all olihe lifersaving devices avaUiable to them or any one. with an emergency. I was impressed when I had ^e chance to see all of it about a month ago. The people of Henderson are very fortunate indeed to have such a service available .to them in. connection with such a fine Hospital as St. Rose De Lima. Tuesdays and Thursday, we. have a physical fitness class from 11 till Jl:30. Barb frx)in Parks and Recre.ation is the instructor and I hear nothing but good about the class. Why don't yQu join us. Men are welcome to join. Yffd. a bus is furnished by Parks and Recreation to take you to VO-Tech to have your hair styled. For an appointment call S65-6990 or 565-0669. Wed. and Thursdays a jepresentative from Social Security is in Boom 7 to serve all residents of Henderfrom 9 till 4. .The Senior Ljiw Project is here twice each month to help Seniors 60 and older with any legal prablem. The next date is May 27th. For an appointment caU 565-6990. Every Thursday is Fun Day. Come and enjoy your Center with us. Playihexard game of your choice. We are giving Cheese to the Needy on Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays^. You should be recieving SSI, Food Stamps, Unemploymejit, or ADC. to qualify. The time is from 12 till 3 on these days.. Lunch is served Mondays through Friday from U:30 tUl 12:30 to Seniors 60 or older ^ married to someone 60 or older. We have some very fine me^s. Try it! You'll like it Next weeks Menu is as follows: Monday-Ham and Lima Beans, TuesdayTurkey and Drejssing, Wed, Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, Thursday-Oven Fried Chicken-Friday-Meat Balls. The Raoul Romero Quintet will perform at Morrell Park in Henderson from 6 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday May 26 as part of the Henderson Parks Si Recreation Department's participation in "Jazz Month." The Quintet will feature the versatile Romero on tenor saxophone and clarinet, Terry Ryan on keyboards. Carmen Castaldi on drums, Carson Smith on bass and a special guest to be announced on trumpet. Romero, a twenty seven year veteran of the local music scene, is a talented composer whose work includes pieces written for jazz bands and symphony orchestras. Recently West Point Academy acquired a number of his compositions for their jazz program. "I don't really follow anybody's style of writing consciously," states Romero, although he does admit to a "latin style rhythm" influence in his work. The Morrel Park concert program will range from original compositions by Romero and Terry Ryan to the standards "The Night Has A Thousand Eyes" and Lionel Ritchie's "Lady," best known as the chart-bustiifg single by Kenny Rogers. Romero, a regular member of the Johnny Haig Orchestra, takes particular pride in his work with the Las Vegas Jazz Society, which in conjunction with the Musicians' Local 369 and Allied Arts Council are coordinating the many Jazz Month activities. "We're building recognition for great music here by bringing it to the parks, schools and cultural arts centers throughout the County," says Romero. Morrell Park, just east off Boulder High-;. way on Major Avenue, ; • is an ideal site for this free concert. It offers a.t spectacular view of Clark County's natural ^ beauty and is a choice spot from which to. watch the sunset while! enjoying the sounds of today's jazz. The public is encouraged to make this a family event, bring a picnic dinner and partake of this celebration of music. For additional information call the Hen-. derson Parks & Recrea-' tion Department ati 565-2120. I K ^ Henderson ladies were elected to serve for the coming year in District 5, Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U.S. at the recent Convention held in Las Vegas. Is Elected To District WN Auxifiary The incoming President of Basic 3848 VFW Auxiliary Alice Wagner was elected to the office of Chaplain. Phyllis Zander was appointed as District Secretary arid Julie Elkie was appointed as Patriotic Instructor for the District. District 5 of the VFW comprises all auxiliaries in Clark County with one in Overton and another auxiliary in Pahrump. The past years accomplishments were observed at the District Convention and further plans made for the forthcoming State Convention to be held in Reno, during June. Christine Gun, of the Herbert Porter VFW Auxiliary No. 10057, was elected to serve as District 5 President. Darkne RaiMaitis to Wed Kent Burgwardt The first known use of the expression "A-1" was said to be by Lloyd's of London, the British insurance organization. Lloyd's graded ships according to the risk of insuring them and those rated "A-1" were thought least likely to sink. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Raulukaitis of Rocky Hill, Conn., announce —the^ngagement oflhelr daughter, Darlene Marie, to Kent Meyer Burgwardt of Henderson. Burgwardt is the son of Dr. Les Burgwardt of Las Vegas, and Leon and Barbara Hunter of Henderson. The marriage will take place June 11 at St. Viators Church. The bride to be is a registered nurse on the pediatric floor at Sunrise Medical Center. She graduated from the University of Bridgeport in Conn. Her fiance is employed at Valley ,^ospi-~ tal in Cedar City, Utah in the emergency room. He is a pre-med student at Southern Utah State College and will attend UNLV in September. The young couple will exchange personal vows following the church wedding in the garden at the Sahara Country Club after which a reception there will follow. They will honeymoon in California and will make their home in Henderson. TO WED ~ Darlene IM. Raulukaitis and Kent Meyer Burgwardt will be married June 11 in Las Vegas. Henderson Community Church United Church of Christ RBNerand Robert W. Kchards, Minster (A Netionwide BrDihertwod) GROWTH CONTINUES With Mr, Bill Kling elected as the new moderator, the years 1953-55 found our church still growing and very productive. He had a lot of support from many other wonderful people who had been elected to support hi^in his leadership. The Board of Education purchased Bibles for students entering the Junior Department, and it became a tradition. By 1955, our attendance at Sunday School had grown to 373, and more room was needed for classrooms. With some adaptation by Hank Jones, a fourth room at the Manse was made useable. Elwood "Pappy" Swift was a big help with manse also, painting, fixing sills, laying linoleum, etc. Sally Leming donated a heater to make the new manse room useable for class. Jack NVilsonjA^as next elected moderator, and good things continued to happen. With new cpolefs now installed in Gilbert Hall, the Men's Bible Class could now be moved from their borrowed meeting place in Judge Charles Dohernwend's chambers which were located in Townsite Unit No. 2 Apartments at that time. The very dependable Women's Association made curtains for Gil bert Hall. Miss lona Hinds was hired as a part time secret ary, and Rev. Gilbert made one new appointment, namely that of wedding hostesses, to help the many couples who used our church for weddings. Joanne Lea and Joyce Litter were the first appointees, and they added a real touch of dignity as representatives of our church. Another highlight for 1955 was the canvassing of the newly built Valley View area homes, inviting them to participate in our services and many ac tivities. (Next week: Building Again?) CHURCH OFFICE Telephone: 565-8563 Hours: 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m Mon Wed., Thurs., Fri If no answer, call 564-1493 or 565-1806 evenings SUNDAY SERVICES Sunday School: 9 am. Worship Services: 10 30 am Sermon: "Handling Criticism: A Time to Keep Sil ent, and a Time to Speak" Scripture: Ecclesiastes 3: 1-8*-* Nursery provided ~ call for transportation The charm of a Lewis-built home, ^hepleasure of living in Boulder Gitjt APRICELESS COMBINATION! Here, in a tranquil, prestigious location, Lewis Hornes has designed two distinctive series of homes. In two price ranges—to match your budget and your needs. :r'T{ Affordably yours... THE CUSSIC SERIES From the mid $60.000s to the upper $70.000s -^^ ,.-* Artistsconcpllon-UndKi()tngno(lncludd Unmatched luxury... THE PRESTIGE SERIES • 2. 3 & 4-bedroom single-story floor plans • Up to 1,541 square feet of liveable area • Cultured marble pullman tops • Oversized garages • Various stylings with cathedral ceilings, family rooms, breakfast bars 'FTom4he^ow $90,000 to the low $100.000s • 1 & 2-story plans with up to 2,307 square feet of living area • 3 or 4 bedrooms. 2 or 2'/z baths • Dramatic wood-burning fireplaces • Ceramic tile entry foyers • Mirrored wardrobe doors or walk-in closet in master suites • Select plans featuring wet bars, powder rooms, laundry rooms, microwave ovens ;i -^ Aitbt'sconcipten-UndKaplngnotlncludtd to" TO LAKE MEAO TO LAS VEGAS "BUILDING IN THE PRESENT-BELIEVING IN THE FUTURE" Also See Our 3& 4 Bedroom Homes In FOOTHILL ESTATES From Boulder Hwy. turn south %]_ on Buchanan Blvd. (at the m 1 ADAMS BLVO < ARCO sUtion) to El Camino ||""*^nii' Way. Uft on El Camino and || p, r.MiK.nl^ WAY follow directional signs to If ^'•C*W'NO|0 WAY models. Open daily 10 a.m. to s p.m Phone: 293-3558 ~^. BOliLOCTCITY Map not 10 (Cal* t^ More than 18,000 satisfied families live In Lewis Homes communities. You should too! BEST Foods inNLV NORTH LAS VEGAS Calling it another step forward in efforts to "make Nevada the light industry capital of America," Governor Robert List Tuesday participated in groundbreaking ceremonies for a 200,000 square-foot distribution center for BEST Products, Inc. BEST Products is the nation's largest catalogue showroom merchandizer, with 110 showrooms in 13 states, including 25 in Southern California. When complete in September or Octo'ber of 1983, the distribution center will be one of three operating for the Richmond, Va., based corporation. Construction costs, including land acquisition and fixtures is approximately $10 million, the governor said. When on line, the distribution center will provide 100 Jobs. "Today's groundbreading is proof that Nevada can go out and successfully compete for major businesses and industry anywhere in the nation," the governor said. BEST Products specializes in small appliances, sporting goods, toys, and spring and summer goods. Henderson Home Newt, Henderson, Nevada Page 7 ABWA Woman of the Week This week's woman of the Week of the American Business Women's Association is Earlene F. Gordon, a member for the last four years. She is branch manager of the Henderson office of the Chicago Title Insurance Company. She has been recording secretary and vice president in theorgani zation and 1981 Woman of the Year. She has been chairman of the Boss Nigh program and Chairman of the 1982 Woman of the year committee as well as chairman for the enrollment event. Senior Citizens New Pick-up Policy at Travel Club NATE MACK ARTIST One of the many student artists to get their art work hung up in the Las Vegas Museum's Young People's Gallery was Jeremy Olson, shown here with his teacher, Mrs. Davich. Jeremy's clown was entered in the multi medium division. OBoulder City and Henderson members of the Senior Citizens Travel Club of Las Vegas will be picked up at their local Safew^ stores for all overnight and extended tours. This courtesy makes the trips available for local members. Just a few seats left for the Canadian tour, July 6-19 cool scenic and fun packed. Deluxe accomodations and reserved seats at the Calgary Stampede and Night show. Visit the snow capped Canadian Rockies, gushing streams, Alpine beauty at Banff and Lake Louise. Phone Jessie Kimball, tour director and make reservations, 456-1969. The Overnight tours scheduled by Jessie Kimball are the following: Hooray for HolI'ood Aug. 18-20. Discover the secrets of movie magic. The new Universal tour, enjoy lunch in the flower^filled Garden oasis of Lawry's and visit the Farmer's Market. Fall Foliage Tour of Oak Creek'Canyon, October 28-31. A photographer's paradise. Thanksgiving Tour November 23-26, overnight in Laguna Beach then two nights in San Diego, Thanksgiving dinner at the Hotel Coronado. Santa Special, December 18-20, Christmas parades. Harbour lights and reserved seats at the Pageant at Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, California. There are two extended tours with Vi Harper, phone Vi for reservations, 734-6518. Mississippi Queen, August 27 -September 3. Fly to St. Louis then sail aboard the Queen a Smooth jTdTnl stern wheeler a luxurious river boat to St. Paul. Panama Canal Oc^Z-MLUJf Travelers to Korea are • often surprised when cab b.g department stores and i,„.„i k-ii 1 fashionable drivers, hotel bell boys, porters and maids refuse to accept a tip. The reason they refuse is that tipping is banned throughout the • r ir ^ • country and, by faw, a ten ^J^" clterTf^p^'Z r_^.r"L^ • '".'!y..''' .\^.^\^..?" and cuUure'?n [he coC^ry! restaurants. Founded a century bjffore Columbus discovered America, its seven palaces attest to its long history as the tober 23 November 3. Fly to Florida then board the S.S. Fairwind. See how the locks of the Panama Canal operate, mules guiding your passage to Lake Gatun and return to the Carribean. Phone Vi 734-8518 for full details. Zion National Park will be the one day trip on June 27, 1982. Shirley Pugh is the director. Lunch and tram ride are included in the cost. Phone 457-1107. The next meeting of the senior Citizens Travel Club of Las Vegas, a non-profit organization, will be June 1st at the First PresbyterUin Church, 1515 W. Charleston, Las Vegas at 1 o'clock. Special door prizes will be awarded, guests are welcome. The club is open to anyone over fifty for a fee of five dol-ilats,annual ly. Phone To protect yourself from Hash floods, stay out of irrigation channels, ditches and arroyos near areas of potential heavy rainfall. Myrtle Kreitling for information 735-7342. Taxi drivers in Seoul, H hotel and restaurant bills If you receive exceptionally good service, you can insist on tipping, but you may Korea are said to be among be refused. the most courteous in the world—courtesy being a traditional trait of the KoSeoul, Korea's walled rean people, ^cky, is old by almost any standards, but it's also a The Amazing Body Has Own Aquastat Friendship is a ship big enough to carry two in fair ~. Your body has a built-Yweather, but only one in foul." Ambrose Bierce ^^'^ modem capital. There in aquastat. It tells you are towering luxury hotels, when you need water. Your sense of thirst is there to ensure that you take enough of the liquid that is essential toall living things. isssssessg CARLINO FOR THE COISSERVATIVE IISVESTOR laaseassesssgesss. lit tiiealth experts say eight glaises of water are neces salv for the average adult to maintain a proper water bj)anc. 'Although water contains ho-calories or vitamins, it's a drink that is found universally refreshing. You should encourage your children to drink plenty of water each day. It may be more healthful than sugared drinks and won't spoil appetites. Many homenukers, concerned over the purity of their community water supply or turned off by the taiBte of tap water because of; certain minerals, are turning to one of the many boiled waters available on th4 market today. 3f you'd like a free bcnklet about these products, send a self addressed stuped envelope to the International Bottled Water Artociation, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Waahington, DC 2000" GRAND4PENING JOIN OUR MEMBERSHIP CLUB IN THE HRST 30 DAYS AND BE BJGIBLE FOR DRAWING JUNE 5,1982 FOR 1st YEAR MBABERSHIP-FREE VIDEORAMA nv iREEKYALLEY PLAZ^ ^VHS a BETA ^ • RENTALS • SALES • MBABERSHIPS --• COMPLETE UNE S L ^. 2734 GREEN VALLEY PKWYrHENDERSON, NV • 89015 SAME DAY SERVICE! DRY CLEANING LAUNDRY GREEN VAUEYWAZA # DRAPERIES AL PHILLIPS IMONDAY THRU SATURDAY EXPERT ALTERATIONS 7 AM. TO 7 PM .^'^ • --| i^t^mM lai

PAGE 7

Page 6 Henderson Home News, Henderson. Nevada Thursday, May 20,1982 Thursday, May 20,1982 (VFW Installs New Officers BUDDY POPPY SALE..CailM Whartoa, Buddy Poppy QuMii of VFW Pwt 3848, seOa the tint py to HendonoB Md^yorUKoy Zike aa the sale opened. BfayorilgBad proclamation paSSd dfiaignaiing May M throogh 31 Baddy Poppy Sale diM. From left, Ethel PfetfTer, AuzUhury rhalmwn, Oiailee Elked Poet Chalnnan, ZIke and I^dea MarthMt, pieeldent of Ladlei Auilllaiy. A joint installation of officers for the 1982-83 year was held last Friday at the new post home of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States and it's Ladies Auxiliary. Outgoing Post Commander, Marty Martinez and Outgoing Auxiliary President, Lydia Martinez, together with the members have been conducting a rigid renovation and cleaning of the building located at the corner of Basic Road and Lake Mead Drive which was recently purchased for the VFW Post Home. State Junior Vice President, Dell Hummer, was the installing officer for the ladies auxiliary and the following were installed into office. Alice Wagner, President^ Delores Darrah, Sr. Vice (, President; Linnie Davis, Jr. Vice President; Ethel Pfeiffer, Chaplain; Pearl Froman. Treasurer; Mary Greenhalgh, Conductress; Thirza Jones, Guard; three year Trustee, Lydia Martinez; two-year Trustee, Evelyn Mitchell; one year Trustee and Patriotic Instructor, Julie Elkie; Flag Bearer, Marcella Fruth; and Color Bearer, Cleo Yeager. Past Department Commander, Charles Elkie installed the men of the Post. The new incoming Commander is Leonard Fruth. Serving with him are, Richard Yeager, Sr. Vice Commander; Stanley Martinez, Jr. Vice Commander; Gilbert Medina, Chaplain; Joel Zander, Quartermaster; Charles Elkie, Adjutant; Homer Englestead, Post Advocated; James Childers, Surgeon; and Trustees, Marty Martinez, Al Romero, and Hank Pfeiffer. Guests at the installation function were District 5 Auxiliary President, Doris Shaefer and District 5 Treasurer, Irene Ackerman, Past State Commander and Auxiliary President, Woody and Mickey Rainbolt, all of Las Vegas and North Las Vegas. Out of state guests were the son and daughter of Ethel and Hank Pfeiffer and Harvery Pfeiffer was the winner of the quilt raf-fle. The raffle brought in funds for the Voice of Democracy, State Scholarship program and the Cancer Aid and Research projects of the auxiliary. Plans are going forward to further enhance the post home building and to continue the work on the special programs of the V.F.W. and the Auxiliary to foster pattiotism, safety in the home and community, service to our veterans in the hospitals and their families in the community, the VFW Natioal Home in Eaton Rapids, Michigan which is for the widow and orphans of deceased or disabled veterans, and other community activities to make our country a better place to live in. Currently, they are^ working on the Buddy" Poppy Drive for May 24 through 31, funds from which go to help veteran families in our community and in the veteran's hospital in Reno, and the veterans at the Outpatient Clinic in Las Vegas. By Edna Deardoff Senior Citizen Center Hem Rooms 6 and 7, Civic Center HPRD Presents Free JAZZ IN THE PARK What a picnic we had on Sat. sponsored by SENIORS FOR SENIORS! Wonderful FoodI Beautiful weather!. Happy Seniors! Mil them all together and you have a DAY to remember! Our fun Day on last Thursday, was well attended and enjoyed by Jill. The lucky Bingo Winners were: JCaty Kelly, Lillian McFexran. Pauline Muace, Jot Santisteven. Frank Thompson, Anne Fletfher, Floyd Hetrick. Boti Ro^s, Wanda Schimbeck, Joanne Smith, and Edith Hetrick. Joanne Smith was. the Binffo Caller, assisted by Joe Garcia. We thank you. Canasta followed and refreshments provided by Ken Holt wete served. Joe. .Garcia was the recipient of the door prize. On Thursday, May 20th at 11 AM, Rex Newell from the Fire Dept. will give a presentation on "Emergency Alert for Seniors". He will bring the Emergency Vehicle so. that the Seniors will have a chance to see all olihe lifersaving devices avaUiable to them or any one. with an emergency. I was impressed when I had ^e chance to see all of it about a month ago. The people of Henderson are very fortunate indeed to have such a service available .to them in. connection with such a fine Hospital as St. Rose De Lima. Tuesdays and Thursday, we. have a physical fitness class from 11 till Jl:30. Barb frx)in Parks and Recre.ation is the instructor and I hear nothing but good about the class. Why don't yQu join us. Men are welcome to join. Yffd. a bus is furnished by Parks and Recreation to take you to VO-Tech to have your hair styled. For an appointment call S65-6990 or 565-0669. Wed. and Thursdays a jepresentative from Social Security is in Boom 7 to serve all residents of Henderfrom 9 till 4. .The Senior Ljiw Project is here twice each month to help Seniors 60 and older with any legal prablem. The next date is May 27th. For an appointment caU 565-6990. Every Thursday is Fun Day. Come and enjoy your Center with us. Playihexard game of your choice. We are giving Cheese to the Needy on Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays^. You should be recieving SSI, Food Stamps, Unemploymejit, or ADC. to qualify. The time is from 12 till 3 on these days.. Lunch is served Mondays through Friday from U:30 tUl 12:30 to Seniors 60 or older ^ married to someone 60 or older. We have some very fine me^s. Try it! You'll like it Next weeks Menu is as follows: Monday-Ham and Lima Beans, TuesdayTurkey and Drejssing, Wed, Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, Thursday-Oven Fried Chicken-Friday-Meat Balls. The Raoul Romero Quintet will perform at Morrell Park in Henderson from 6 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday May 26 as part of the Henderson Parks Si Recreation Department's participation in "Jazz Month." The Quintet will feature the versatile Romero on tenor saxophone and clarinet, Terry Ryan on keyboards. Carmen Castaldi on drums, Carson Smith on bass and a special guest to be announced on trumpet. Romero, a twenty seven year veteran of the local music scene, is a talented composer whose work includes pieces written for jazz bands and symphony orchestras. Recently West Point Academy acquired a number of his compositions for their jazz program. "I don't really follow anybody's style of writing consciously," states Romero, although he does admit to a "latin style rhythm" influence in his work. The Morrel Park concert program will range from original compositions by Romero and Terry Ryan to the standards "The Night Has A Thousand Eyes" and Lionel Ritchie's "Lady," best known as the chart-bustiifg single by Kenny Rogers. Romero, a regular member of the Johnny Haig Orchestra, takes particular pride in his work with the Las Vegas Jazz Society, which in conjunction with the Musicians' Local 369 and Allied Arts Council are coordinating the many Jazz Month activities. "We're building recognition for great music here by bringing it to the parks, schools and cultural arts centers throughout the County," says Romero. Morrell Park, just east off Boulder High-;. way on Major Avenue, ; • is an ideal site for this free concert. It offers a.t spectacular view of Clark County's natural ^ beauty and is a choice spot from which to. watch the sunset while! enjoying the sounds of today's jazz. The public is encouraged to make this a family event, bring a picnic dinner and partake of this celebration of music. For additional information call the Hen-. derson Parks & Recrea-' tion Department ati 565-2120. I K ^ Henderson ladies were elected to serve for the coming year in District 5, Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U.S. at the recent Convention held in Las Vegas. Is Elected To District WN Auxifiary The incoming President of Basic 3848 VFW Auxiliary Alice Wagner was elected to the office of Chaplain. Phyllis Zander was appointed as District Secretary arid Julie Elkie was appointed as Patriotic Instructor for the District. District 5 of the VFW comprises all auxiliaries in Clark County with one in Overton and another auxiliary in Pahrump. The past years accomplishments were observed at the District Convention and further plans made for the forthcoming State Convention to be held in Reno, during June. Christine Gun, of the Herbert Porter VFW Auxiliary No. 10057, was elected to serve as District 5 President. Darkne RaiMaitis to Wed Kent Burgwardt The first known use of the expression "A-1" was said to be by Lloyd's of London, the British insurance organization. Lloyd's graded ships according to the risk of insuring them and those rated "A-1" were thought least likely to sink. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Raulukaitis of Rocky Hill, Conn., announce —the^ngagement oflhelr daughter, Darlene Marie, to Kent Meyer Burgwardt of Henderson. Burgwardt is the son of Dr. Les Burgwardt of Las Vegas, and Leon and Barbara Hunter of Henderson. The marriage will take place June 11 at St. Viators Church. The bride to be is a registered nurse on the pediatric floor at Sunrise Medical Center. She graduated from the University of Bridgeport in Conn. Her fiance is employed at Valley ,^ospi-~ tal in Cedar City, Utah in the emergency room. He is a pre-med student at Southern Utah State College and will attend UNLV in September. The young couple will exchange personal vows following the church wedding in the garden at the Sahara Country Club after which a reception there will follow. They will honeymoon in California and will make their home in Henderson. TO WED ~ Darlene IM. Raulukaitis and Kent Meyer Burgwardt will be married June 11 in Las Vegas. Henderson Community Church United Church of Christ RBNerand Robert W. Kchards, Minster (A Netionwide BrDihertwod) GROWTH CONTINUES With Mr, Bill Kling elected as the new moderator, the years 1953-55 found our church still growing and very productive. He had a lot of support from many other wonderful people who had been elected to support hi^in his leadership. The Board of Education purchased Bibles for students entering the Junior Department, and it became a tradition. By 1955, our attendance at Sunday School had grown to 373, and more room was needed for classrooms. With some adaptation by Hank Jones, a fourth room at the Manse was made useable. Elwood "Pappy" Swift was a big help with manse also, painting, fixing sills, laying linoleum, etc. Sally Leming donated a heater to make the new manse room useable for class. Jack NVilsonjA^as next elected moderator, and good things continued to happen. With new cpolefs now installed in Gilbert Hall, the Men's Bible Class could now be moved from their borrowed meeting place in Judge Charles Dohernwend's chambers which were located in Townsite Unit No. 2 Apartments at that time. The very dependable Women's Association made curtains for Gil bert Hall. Miss lona Hinds was hired as a part time secret ary, and Rev. Gilbert made one new appointment, namely that of wedding hostesses, to help the many couples who used our church for weddings. Joanne Lea and Joyce Litter were the first appointees, and they added a real touch of dignity as representatives of our church. Another highlight for 1955 was the canvassing of the newly built Valley View area homes, inviting them to participate in our services and many ac tivities. (Next week: Building Again?) CHURCH OFFICE Telephone: 565-8563 Hours: 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m Mon Wed., Thurs., Fri If no answer, call 564-1493 or 565-1806 evenings SUNDAY SERVICES Sunday School: 9 am. Worship Services: 10 30 am Sermon: "Handling Criticism: A Time to Keep Sil ent, and a Time to Speak" Scripture: Ecclesiastes 3: 1-8*-* Nursery provided ~ call for transportation The charm of a Lewis-built home, ^hepleasure of living in Boulder Gitjt APRICELESS COMBINATION! Here, in a tranquil, prestigious location, Lewis Hornes has designed two distinctive series of homes. In two price ranges—to match your budget and your needs. :r'T{ Affordably yours... THE CUSSIC SERIES From the mid $60.000s to the upper $70.000s -^^ ,.-* Artistsconcpllon-UndKi()tngno(lncludd Unmatched luxury... THE PRESTIGE SERIES • 2. 3 & 4-bedroom single-story floor plans • Up to 1,541 square feet of liveable area • Cultured marble pullman tops • Oversized garages • Various stylings with cathedral ceilings, family rooms, breakfast bars 'FTom4he^ow $90,000 to the low $100.000s • 1 & 2-story plans with up to 2,307 square feet of living area • 3 or 4 bedrooms. 2 or 2'/z baths • Dramatic wood-burning fireplaces • Ceramic tile entry foyers • Mirrored wardrobe doors or walk-in closet in master suites • Select plans featuring wet bars, powder rooms, laundry rooms, microwave ovens ;i -^ Aitbt'sconcipten-UndKaplngnotlncludtd to" TO LAKE MEAO TO LAS VEGAS "BUILDING IN THE PRESENT-BELIEVING IN THE FUTURE" Also See Our 3& 4 Bedroom Homes In FOOTHILL ESTATES From Boulder Hwy. turn south %]_ on Buchanan Blvd. (at the m 1 ADAMS BLVO < ARCO sUtion) to El Camino ||""*^nii' Way. Uft on El Camino and || p, r.MiK.nl^ WAY follow directional signs to If ^'•C*W'NO|0 WAY models. Open daily 10 a.m. to s p.m Phone: 293-3558 ~^. BOliLOCTCITY Map not 10 (Cal* t^ More than 18,000 satisfied families live In Lewis Homes communities. You should too! BEST Foods inNLV NORTH LAS VEGAS Calling it another step forward in efforts to "make Nevada the light industry capital of America," Governor Robert List Tuesday participated in groundbreaking ceremonies for a 200,000 square-foot distribution center for BEST Products, Inc. BEST Products is the nation's largest catalogue showroom merchandizer, with 110 showrooms in 13 states, including 25 in Southern California. When complete in September or Octo'ber of 1983, the distribution center will be one of three operating for the Richmond, Va., based corporation. Construction costs, including land acquisition and fixtures is approximately $10 million, the governor said. When on line, the distribution center will provide 100 Jobs. "Today's groundbreading is proof that Nevada can go out and successfully compete for major businesses and industry anywhere in the nation," the governor said. BEST Products specializes in small appliances, sporting goods, toys, and spring and summer goods. Henderson Home Newt, Henderson, Nevada Page 7 ABWA Woman of the Week This week's woman of the Week of the American Business Women's Association is Earlene F. Gordon, a member for the last four years. She is branch manager of the Henderson office of the Chicago Title Insurance Company. She has been recording secretary and vice president in theorgani zation and 1981 Woman of the Year. She has been chairman of the Boss Nigh program and Chairman of the 1982 Woman of the year committee as well as chairman for the enrollment event. Senior Citizens New Pick-up Policy at Travel Club NATE MACK ARTIST One of the many student artists to get their art work hung up in the Las Vegas Museum's Young People's Gallery was Jeremy Olson, shown here with his teacher, Mrs. Davich. Jeremy's clown was entered in the multi medium division. OBoulder City and Henderson members of the Senior Citizens Travel Club of Las Vegas will be picked up at their local Safew^ stores for all overnight and extended tours. This courtesy makes the trips available for local members. Just a few seats left for the Canadian tour, July 6-19 cool scenic and fun packed. Deluxe accomodations and reserved seats at the Calgary Stampede and Night show. Visit the snow capped Canadian Rockies, gushing streams, Alpine beauty at Banff and Lake Louise. Phone Jessie Kimball, tour director and make reservations, 456-1969. The Overnight tours scheduled by Jessie Kimball are the following: Hooray for HolI'ood Aug. 18-20. Discover the secrets of movie magic. The new Universal tour, enjoy lunch in the flower^filled Garden oasis of Lawry's and visit the Farmer's Market. Fall Foliage Tour of Oak Creek'Canyon, October 28-31. A photographer's paradise. Thanksgiving Tour November 23-26, overnight in Laguna Beach then two nights in San Diego, Thanksgiving dinner at the Hotel Coronado. Santa Special, December 18-20, Christmas parades. Harbour lights and reserved seats at the Pageant at Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, California. There are two extended tours with Vi Harper, phone Vi for reservations, 734-6518. Mississippi Queen, August 27 -September 3. Fly to St. Louis then sail aboard the Queen a Smooth jTdTnl stern wheeler a luxurious river boat to St. Paul. Panama Canal Oc^Z-MLUJf Travelers to Korea are • often surprised when cab b.g department stores and i,„.„i k-ii 1 fashionable drivers, hotel bell boys, porters and maids refuse to accept a tip. The reason they refuse is that tipping is banned throughout the • r ir ^ • country and, by faw, a ten ^J^" clterTf^p^'Z r_^.r"L^ • '".'!y..''' .\^.^\^..?" and cuUure'?n [he coC^ry! restaurants. Founded a century bjffore Columbus discovered America, its seven palaces attest to its long history as the tober 23 November 3. Fly to Florida then board the S.S. Fairwind. See how the locks of the Panama Canal operate, mules guiding your passage to Lake Gatun and return to the Carribean. Phone Vi 734-8518 for full details. Zion National Park will be the one day trip on June 27, 1982. Shirley Pugh is the director. Lunch and tram ride are included in the cost. Phone 457-1107. The next meeting of the senior Citizens Travel Club of Las Vegas, a non-profit organization, will be June 1st at the First PresbyterUin Church, 1515 W. Charleston, Las Vegas at 1 o'clock. Special door prizes will be awarded, guests are welcome. The club is open to anyone over fifty for a fee of five dol-ilats,annual ly. Phone To protect yourself from Hash floods, stay out of irrigation channels, ditches and arroyos near areas of potential heavy rainfall. Myrtle Kreitling for information 735-7342. Taxi drivers in Seoul, H hotel and restaurant bills If you receive exceptionally good service, you can insist on tipping, but you may Korea are said to be among be refused. the most courteous in the world—courtesy being a traditional trait of the KoSeoul, Korea's walled rean people, ^cky, is old by almost any standards, but it's also a The Amazing Body Has Own Aquastat Friendship is a ship big enough to carry two in fair ~. Your body has a built-Yweather, but only one in foul." Ambrose Bierce ^^'^ modem capital. There in aquastat. It tells you are towering luxury hotels, when you need water. Your sense of thirst is there to ensure that you take enough of the liquid that is essential toall living things. isssssessg CARLINO FOR THE COISSERVATIVE IISVESTOR laaseassesssgesss. lit tiiealth experts say eight glaises of water are neces salv for the average adult to maintain a proper water bj)anc. 'Although water contains ho-calories or vitamins, it's a drink that is found universally refreshing. You should encourage your children to drink plenty of water each day. It may be more healthful than sugared drinks and won't spoil appetites. Many homenukers, concerned over the purity of their community water supply or turned off by the taiBte of tap water because of; certain minerals, are turning to one of the many boiled waters available on th4 market today. 3f you'd like a free bcnklet about these products, send a self addressed stuped envelope to the International Bottled Water Artociation, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Waahington, DC 2000" GRAND4PENING JOIN OUR MEMBERSHIP CLUB IN THE HRST 30 DAYS AND BE BJGIBLE FOR DRAWING JUNE 5,1982 FOR 1st YEAR MBABERSHIP-FREE VIDEORAMA nv iREEKYALLEY PLAZ^ ^VHS a BETA ^ • RENTALS • SALES • MBABERSHIPS --• COMPLETE UNE S L ^. 2734 GREEN VALLEY PKWYrHENDERSON, NV • 89015 SAME DAY SERVICE! DRY CLEANING LAUNDRY GREEN VAUEYWAZA # DRAPERIES AL PHILLIPS IMONDAY THRU SATURDAY EXPERT ALTERATIONS 7 AM. TO 7 PM .^'^ • --| i^t^mM lai

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^^ Pa^e 8 Henderson Home Newt, Henderion, Nevada Some Of The Past Wejks' Activities In Henderson Thufsdiy, Mty 20,198!^ Thuriday, Nay 20,1982 Henderson Hotte News, Hendert n, Nevada Page 9 W^ MEMORIAL PLANTING -Students at Gordon who died last year. The trees are provided by McCaw school aid workmen in setting up the the Gordon McCaw Trust Fund, memorial planter for the late Gordon McCaw, -NEW PIANO Principal Neil Twitchell of McCaw PTA. Sherilyn Gaisin. PTA secretary Gordon McCaw Elementary School tries out and Willma Floyd, president prepare to listen, new piano donated to the school bv the Gordon THANKS TO CHARLOTTE -Charlotte Crowley accepts flowers from Girl Scout Troop Leader Kathy Bunda. Crowley donated food for a recent camping trip to the Mount Charleston to Junior Girl Scout Troup 111. With Crowley and Bunda are front row From left Dawn Joyner, Shannon Kidd, Wendy Delia, Michelle Smith and in back row Kit Clark, Diana Purdy and Nancy Wood. SENIORS HONORED • • The three women above were honored Sunday at the Seniors for Seniors picnic and were presented with awards. From left, Judy Bremmer received a curmudgeon award, "Smiles" Cunningham who received a certificate of Appreciation and Emma Jessop who also received a curmudgeon award. wK^^^ Tee Bal Action Between the Golden Bears and the Cougars Tuesday in Green Valey Litlle League Plenty of cooks for the goodns at 'Seniors for Seniors' picnic ii Morrell Park Mbcebneous News Missiles By L. Jessie Bennett MILTON SAID "The greatest burden in the world is superstition, not only of ceremonies in the church, but of imaginary and scarecrow sins at home." (Milton) SPECIAL DAY FOR MICAH RINCON May 9,1982, was a special day in the life of young Micah Rincon, son of Mike and Donni Rincon. Micah was baptized on May 9th (Mother's Day) at St. Peter's Church in Henderson. A dinner party featuring all the family specalities like roast lamb and Tamalies was served at Morrell Park. Mike and Donni with Micah's Godparents, Ray and Karen Martinez hosted the festivities for many friends, relations and out-of-town guests. From Klngman, AZ there were Jean Hacker, grandmother, Clifford and Eva Neal, grandparents, Rhamona Neal, Paul and Julie Neal and sons. Mrs. Cataline Lopez, great-grandmother, Fred Lopez and Barbara Lopez were from Blythe, CA. Also attending were Micah's big brother, Jake and friends and family fTom Henderson. ACCIDENT David Irons was in an auto accident last week but suffered only minor but painful injuries. We and family were happy things were not more serious. GRADUATION 1982 May 27 is Graduation Day -1982, for Basic High School and a proud, exciting day for each graduate. The Commencement Exercises will be held at 6 p.m. at the Aladdin Theatre in Las Vegas. Raaching back in memory I could say so much • bout High School Graduation ... no, I won't, just give special congratulations and best wishes for every success in the future of each graduate. FIRST BABY WALLACE Holly Nichole Wallace, first child of Kevin and Valarie Wallace was born on Tuesday, May 11, '1982 at St. Rose de Lima Hospital, weighing seven pounds four and a half ounces and twenty and a half inches in length. She is a true Southern Belle bom in Nevada's southland and having roots also n Mississippi, the heart of the nation's south. Holly's grandparents are Ray and Lettie McPherson of Brandon, Mississipi, Owen Wallace and Mrs. Berta Fuller of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Lettie McPherson has been in Henderson to be with Valarie and baby and also to visit another daughter, Mrs. Everett Evans and grandsons. She is really enjoying her stay in Vegas Valley. COLORADO VISITOR When Anni Dziewior who lives in the mile-high city of Denver, Colorado came to town, she and good fViend Eveline Whitmore had lots to talk about. Anni is from East Germany and Eveline is also from Germany and although they have been citizens for many years they had lots of memories to discuss. Anni especially like Lake Mead and the many family type things to enjoy in our community away from the g 1 nour of do wn town and the strip. Lutheran Church News The congregation of Our Savior 8 Lutheran Church, 59 Lyno Laae, eztendt a cordial Invitation .to all to worship with us next Sunday. The Rev. Ronald Maver is our paitor and services Degin, at 10:45 a.m. Pitor Ron also gives 1 .chUdrens message each Sundfty. The Sacrament of Holy Communion is celebrated the Ist and 3rd Sunday of the month. Sunday ^School and tiie Adult Bible classes begin at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday the 25th of May, the Bible Study Otoup will meet at the church at 10:00 a.m. We will go to Las VgM io tour their keautiful new niebyterian Church, and ttop .foe lunch. St Rose de Uma Has Any one wishing io go -be at the church at 10:00. Xhe^ Choir meets for practice at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday.. Sharon Mauroshek is our director tnd Ethel Pfejffer is our organist. .Vactlon Bible School is sdieduled for June 14-18 from 9:0011:30 a.m. We need helpers-Contact Linda Croft .for more information. Save your old nylon hose and coupons, and also your old eye glasses. The Good Shepherd Lutheran Homes of the West (for retarded people) can make good use oif them. For your prayer requests, please, (all our Prayer Chain at 565-8103. God answers prayers I Pastor's Comer: "If God Is kept outside there.is 3omethbig wrong inside I" DUP MEETS Winnie Prince was hostess of the closing social for the members of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers at her home. There were 15 members present who enjoyed a Salad Bar luncheon that included varied jello salads with the green salads and hot, home-made rolls. The new officers led by Captain Maxine Buckles were installed by Beverly Grosscurth who is the County Leader of the D.U.P. A special welcome was given Ruth Moore who can be counted a pioneer of this area having lived in Boulder City since 1936. She left for a short time but is now "home" again. The D.U.P. will take the summer off and meet again in September. BABY BOY-IBSON Thias and R. Owen Gibson of Boulder City are proud to announce the birth of a little grandson in American Fork, Utah on Thursday, May 13, 1982. He will be 'named Lance and is the infant son of Larry and Shirley (Barton) Gibson of Alpine, Utah. Shirley was a Basic High School graduate, the daughter of Joseph and Lola Barton who are presently in Pennsylvania. Congratulations of that little boy. THE PENCIL Since it is nearly the end of school and thousands of students and teachers will be putting their pencils away for the summer I looked up "pencil" and came up with a few little things that might be of interest. In the first place the pencil has been mis-named as a "lead pencil" for the only lead in a pencil was probably traces in the paint covering wood casings. The little miracle core that writes (marks) hundreds of words (good, bad, whatever) really consists of a mixture of graphite and clay. The amount of graphite determines the color and softness of the lead. More graphite makes for darker copy and is called "soft." A No. 2 pencil is most often used. Historically the name probably derives from the Romans who would use a lead disc to draw lines on a papyrus scroll and then wrote across the lines with a tiny brush called pencillus. It was 1564 in Borrowdale, Eng., during a violent electric storm that up-rooted trees and uncovered a vast supply of pure graphite (thought then to be a form of lead) and by 1565 a German-Swiss naturalist, Konrad von Gesner had attached graphite to a wooden holder to make notes and sketches. Today, amid predictions that the household pencil is on its way out (because of ball-point pens, the typewriter, computers, etc.) one typical pencil can trace a 35-mile long line or write no fewer than 45,000 words. Say -with a couple of pencils, sufficient paper; time and talent, the great American novel could be wj-itten!! SALE Saturdays are interesting because on that day you can jump in your car and go all over town to quite a few garage or yard sales. Bette Stearman and friends are going to have one Saturday, May 22nd, at 115 Hickory St., from 8 to 12 in the a.m.. HOSPITALIZED Mavis Bennett, retired High School teacher, had some eye surgery last week and is now home recouperating. Get real well quick. Mavis, comes from her many friends, neighbors and family. UTAH VISITORS Michelle Clark is showing off that new little baby boy born in April to some friends from Enoch, Utah. They were Edna and Franklin Jones who were in Henderson for a few days last week. CONDOLENCES Wish to extend condolences to Rose and Arland Sargent. Rose's father died last week in Caliente, Nevada of a heart attack. We know that he will be missed, SURGERY Delia Scobleof McGill, Nevada is at the home of Valene and Harold Scoble recovering after back surgery in Las Vegas hospital. Delia is Harold's mom and we send out many get well wishes for her swift recovery. Delia is also the sister of long time resident, Amy Dickinson. -r RECIPE Take 2 heaping cups of patience 1 heartful of love 2 handsful of generosity Dash of laughter 1 headful of understanding Sprinkle generously with kindness Add plenty of faith and mix well Spread over a period of a lifetime And serve everybody you can. BIRTHDAYS Valdez, Burl Bardin, Patricia Hyde, Joey McBride, Iris Neilson, Russell N. Moore, Tom Bennett, Kim Hiar, Pauline Bigler, Ilija Ilic, Josh Shepherd, Tommy Freeman, Bob Proffitt. May 26 Larry Goldston, Mark Farnsworth, Danny Farnsworth, Ralph Danise, Bill Henry, Kirk Hafen, Barbara Whetstone, Denise Miner, Debbie Murphy, Michael King, Rebecca Brown, Paige Neilson, Joy Anderson, Ronald Gill, Russell Gubler. May 27 -iValene Scoble, Tullie Prisbrey, Sharyn ^Smith, Rick Knappenberger, Leslie Leavitt. Dorene England, Lori Brown, Rodney Burr, Paul Orton, Brenda Taney, Robert Henry, Jr., Kenneth D. Hanrahan, Arik Miles Kozlowski, Benjamin Simpkins. r ANNIVERSARIES May 20 Dennis and Sharon Groft; Dave and Shirley Buck. May 21 R.L. and Helen Smoot, Wendle and Ruby Hatch. May 22 Ray ahd Linda Clark, David and Connie Rowley, Richard and Connie Albright. May 23 Eugene and Bonnie Fry, Ricky and Debby Hunt; Phyllis and George Diether; Eldon and Esther Chase. May 24 • Ron and Sue Phillips. May 26 Curley and Beryl Francis; Neil and Wanda Twitchell, Mandy and Selida Stevens; Mr. and Mrs. Don Grossardt; Jack and Willa Caldwell. May 27 Delbert and Dixie Blanchard; Julie and Chris Smith, Rich and Mary Knappenberger; Wyman and Alice Ray; Larry and Marilyn Utley; Gordon and Angela Reno. May 20 Vilate Homer, Brian Alfred Tobler, Nancy Huffington, Lee Sanders, Wm. J. Holgate, Aaron Scott DeGraf, Waylon Shaw, Norman Close, Pat Madsen, Robbie Watts, Darren Swartzlander, LaVerda Daughtery, Foy Seegmiller, Lynn Kirk, Heather McCall, Shane Stratton, Terri Lee Goodale, Actor Jimmie Stewart is 74 today. May 21 Dana Sheehan, Mike Bowen, Lynette Weight, David Roundy, Evelyn Jones, Marie Morley, Jeff Anderson, Laurel M. Brown, Martha Darrow, Lisa Long, Vonda Morton, Eugene Lambert, Wilba (Billie) Clark, and also actor Raymond Burr. May 22 Vernea Walker, Brian Gill, Shannon Carducci, Linda Clark, Starr Solomon, Hilda Hobbs, Jason Stephens, David Hall, Walter G. Smith. Shannon Walker, Heather Neilson, Gary Stewart, Milissa Mills all share a birthday with Sir Lawrence Olivier, actor, who is 75 on this day. May 23 Kaylyn Lords, John May, Ronald Gubler, Madalyn Schmutz, David Neal, Julie Poulsen, Elaine Tannehill, Reagan Dennett, Kristina Mahaffey, Sandy Cocks, Ron Brimhall, Dianne Walters, Emily Brubaker, LaMar Stoker, Douglas Stoker, Kelly Webb, Ross F. Purcell, Debbie Lamb, Paris Watson Chavez, Donna Gillies. May 24 Rachel Sillitoe, Eola Brodie, Robyn Rowland, George L. Schmutz, Joshua Brandon, Mildred Christy, Kenneth Simkins, Shirley Sandin, James Norvill, Robert Proffitt, Nelson Pratt. May 25 Craig Miller, Harold Rey Call, Tony Elks Host Benefit Rsh Fry and Dance There will be a fish fry and dance at the Henderson Elks Lodge on May 29. Senior citizens and children under 12 will onlv be charged $1.50 all other adults will bej charged $3 for their dinner. Dancingwill startat9 p,m, to the music of Randy Anderson. Entry fee for the dance will be the purchase of a raffle ticket on an AM FM stereo phonograph for only $1 per ticket. All profits from this gala event go to support the Nevada State Elks P.EO. Convention Held Delegates from 28 chapters of the Philanthropic Educational Organization Sisterhood of Nevada gathered in Las Vegas on May 6 and 7 for a state convention conducted by Mrs. Ford L. Gilbert of Henderson, state president. Reflecting her religious background in working several decades with her late husband, who was a Methodist minister in Las Vegas and Henderson, she chose an inspirational theme for the conference. Business sessions and workshops were climaxed with a banquet at the Sahara Hotel, headquarters for the 77 delegates. Husbands of members joined the festivities, at which Anthony Thomas and Cindy Hubert, presented a musical program. George Gilbert of Las Vegas, son of the president, was master of ceremonies, and her daughter, Mrs. James W. Porter, served as a page and guard. J^ew state officers installed were: president, Doris Selbig of Reno; first vice president, Ethel McNeely of Reno; second vice president, Shirley Brown of Las Vegas; organizer, Mary Lou Noel of Carson City; corresponding secretary, Alice Parson of Las Vegas; treasurer, Mary Aaronson of Sparks; and recording secretary, Anita Bray of Hawthorne, The banquet was the occasion for a reunion of the family of Mrs. Gilbert, Among those attending were her sons anddaughter and spouses and several grandchildren, including: Messrs, and MesdamesJamesW. Porter, James K. Porter, Alan Calvert, George Gilbert, and Stephen Gilbert; and Ford Van Gilbert, Paul Porter, and Cynthia Porter. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Corcoran of Westminister, Calif., brother in law and sister of Mrs. Gilbert, also were present. Two charter members of Chapter R, Henderson, returned for the conference. They were Marjorie Ivary of Ferndale, Wash., and Jean Arkell of Hailey, Idaho. major project "Amblypia" lazy eye in children. So far in Henderson our nurse Joanne Simonsen has screened over one hundred children between the ages of 4 and 7 and referred five percent for further testing. This is all done free thanks to the support given to the Elks major project. Dinner starts at 5 p,m. at the Elks Lodge Hall on East Lake Mead Blvd. come and enjoy. "Pool Chlor Makes It Nice b Eas/* WEEKLY CHEMICAL SERVICE 25 JIO per month with INITIAL STARTljP FEE '30i)0 Includes ail necessary chemicals to maintain proper water balance 6 POOL CHLOR OF NEVADA. INC 362-8295 :6 SPEAR Pool Service & Repair Co. PROFESSIONAL POOL SERVICE AND REPAIRS CALL US b SEE JUST HOW REASONABLE OUR WEEKLY POOL CLEANING SERVICE CAN BE SPEAR POOL SERVICE &REPAK CO7 362-8295 Ikxxiuflve A Wood drive will be heli Friday, May 21 ft-oat>7p,m,atStRose de Ltea Hospital. Th blood will be proctod by the United Blood Services. Anyoao Boy donate blood for tko drive. The drive will bo kold In the annex of the heOfMtol. CONORATULATIONS WOLU£$ \ Rep up the $ood wor Your eyes really deserve BRx-Quality ... the sunwear with a difference. You can get a broad choice of superior lenses —polarized, tints in many colors, photochromies. In Rx or piano (non-Rx). And a wide choice of frames styled to look best on you. And expert fitting foi extra comfort. That's the way to give your eyes a break in the sun. If you're not sure your prescriptton is up-to-date, see your eye doctor soon. A littia flour mixad into the rtntaini of mlt•d chocolate in the pen cen get the lait bit of chocolate out of the pan and into the cake batter. MEN'S ri SHOP 565-6421 Safeway Shopping Center Boulder Highway Nen^rson HOURS OHH 9 6 MOWOtT TNeU S/kTURO/tT NPV Available at BRx Authorized Professional Distributors or AOUALITY EYEWEAR SINCE 1913 See your Yellow Pages under Opticians SpfVntt *"*Jic\a*\ St. Rose de Lima Prof. Bldg. SUlW\?rchar,.,vu. 564-2519 ,\ntoSuwtnr

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^^ Pa^e 8 Henderson Home Newt, Henderion, Nevada Some Of The Past Wejks' Activities In Henderson Thufsdiy, Mty 20,198!^ Thuriday, Nay 20,1982 Henderson Hotte News, Hendert n, Nevada Page 9 W^ MEMORIAL PLANTING -Students at Gordon who died last year. The trees are provided by McCaw school aid workmen in setting up the the Gordon McCaw Trust Fund, memorial planter for the late Gordon McCaw, -NEW PIANO Principal Neil Twitchell of McCaw PTA. Sherilyn Gaisin. PTA secretary Gordon McCaw Elementary School tries out and Willma Floyd, president prepare to listen, new piano donated to the school bv the Gordon THANKS TO CHARLOTTE -Charlotte Crowley accepts flowers from Girl Scout Troop Leader Kathy Bunda. Crowley donated food for a recent camping trip to the Mount Charleston to Junior Girl Scout Troup 111. With Crowley and Bunda are front row From left Dawn Joyner, Shannon Kidd, Wendy Delia, Michelle Smith and in back row Kit Clark, Diana Purdy and Nancy Wood. SENIORS HONORED • • The three women above were honored Sunday at the Seniors for Seniors picnic and were presented with awards. From left, Judy Bremmer received a curmudgeon award, "Smiles" Cunningham who received a certificate of Appreciation and Emma Jessop who also received a curmudgeon award. wK^^^ Tee Bal Action Between the Golden Bears and the Cougars Tuesday in Green Valey Litlle League Plenty of cooks for the goodns at 'Seniors for Seniors' picnic ii Morrell Park Mbcebneous News Missiles By L. Jessie Bennett MILTON SAID "The greatest burden in the world is superstition, not only of ceremonies in the church, but of imaginary and scarecrow sins at home." (Milton) SPECIAL DAY FOR MICAH RINCON May 9,1982, was a special day in the life of young Micah Rincon, son of Mike and Donni Rincon. Micah was baptized on May 9th (Mother's Day) at St. Peter's Church in Henderson. A dinner party featuring all the family specalities like roast lamb and Tamalies was served at Morrell Park. Mike and Donni with Micah's Godparents, Ray and Karen Martinez hosted the festivities for many friends, relations and out-of-town guests. From Klngman, AZ there were Jean Hacker, grandmother, Clifford and Eva Neal, grandparents, Rhamona Neal, Paul and Julie Neal and sons. Mrs. Cataline Lopez, great-grandmother, Fred Lopez and Barbara Lopez were from Blythe, CA. Also attending were Micah's big brother, Jake and friends and family fTom Henderson. ACCIDENT David Irons was in an auto accident last week but suffered only minor but painful injuries. We and family were happy things were not more serious. GRADUATION 1982 May 27 is Graduation Day -1982, for Basic High School and a proud, exciting day for each graduate. The Commencement Exercises will be held at 6 p.m. at the Aladdin Theatre in Las Vegas. Raaching back in memory I could say so much • bout High School Graduation ... no, I won't, just give special congratulations and best wishes for every success in the future of each graduate. FIRST BABY WALLACE Holly Nichole Wallace, first child of Kevin and Valarie Wallace was born on Tuesday, May 11, '1982 at St. Rose de Lima Hospital, weighing seven pounds four and a half ounces and twenty and a half inches in length. She is a true Southern Belle bom in Nevada's southland and having roots also n Mississippi, the heart of the nation's south. Holly's grandparents are Ray and Lettie McPherson of Brandon, Mississipi, Owen Wallace and Mrs. Berta Fuller of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Lettie McPherson has been in Henderson to be with Valarie and baby and also to visit another daughter, Mrs. Everett Evans and grandsons. She is really enjoying her stay in Vegas Valley. COLORADO VISITOR When Anni Dziewior who lives in the mile-high city of Denver, Colorado came to town, she and good fViend Eveline Whitmore had lots to talk about. Anni is from East Germany and Eveline is also from Germany and although they have been citizens for many years they had lots of memories to discuss. Anni especially like Lake Mead and the many family type things to enjoy in our community away from the g 1 nour of do wn town and the strip. Lutheran Church News The congregation of Our Savior 8 Lutheran Church, 59 Lyno Laae, eztendt a cordial Invitation .to all to worship with us next Sunday. The Rev. Ronald Maver is our paitor and services Degin, at 10:45 a.m. Pitor Ron also gives 1 .chUdrens message each Sundfty. The Sacrament of Holy Communion is celebrated the Ist and 3rd Sunday of the month. Sunday ^School and tiie Adult Bible classes begin at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday the 25th of May, the Bible Study Otoup will meet at the church at 10:00 a.m. We will go to Las VgM io tour their keautiful new niebyterian Church, and ttop .foe lunch. St Rose de Uma Has Any one wishing io go -be at the church at 10:00. Xhe^ Choir meets for practice at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday.. Sharon Mauroshek is our director tnd Ethel Pfejffer is our organist. .Vactlon Bible School is sdieduled for June 14-18 from 9:0011:30 a.m. We need helpers-Contact Linda Croft .for more information. Save your old nylon hose and coupons, and also your old eye glasses. The Good Shepherd Lutheran Homes of the West (for retarded people) can make good use oif them. For your prayer requests, please, (all our Prayer Chain at 565-8103. God answers prayers I Pastor's Comer: "If God Is kept outside there.is 3omethbig wrong inside I" DUP MEETS Winnie Prince was hostess of the closing social for the members of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers at her home. There were 15 members present who enjoyed a Salad Bar luncheon that included varied jello salads with the green salads and hot, home-made rolls. The new officers led by Captain Maxine Buckles were installed by Beverly Grosscurth who is the County Leader of the D.U.P. A special welcome was given Ruth Moore who can be counted a pioneer of this area having lived in Boulder City since 1936. She left for a short time but is now "home" again. The D.U.P. will take the summer off and meet again in September. BABY BOY-IBSON Thias and R. Owen Gibson of Boulder City are proud to announce the birth of a little grandson in American Fork, Utah on Thursday, May 13, 1982. He will be 'named Lance and is the infant son of Larry and Shirley (Barton) Gibson of Alpine, Utah. Shirley was a Basic High School graduate, the daughter of Joseph and Lola Barton who are presently in Pennsylvania. Congratulations of that little boy. THE PENCIL Since it is nearly the end of school and thousands of students and teachers will be putting their pencils away for the summer I looked up "pencil" and came up with a few little things that might be of interest. In the first place the pencil has been mis-named as a "lead pencil" for the only lead in a pencil was probably traces in the paint covering wood casings. The little miracle core that writes (marks) hundreds of words (good, bad, whatever) really consists of a mixture of graphite and clay. The amount of graphite determines the color and softness of the lead. More graphite makes for darker copy and is called "soft." A No. 2 pencil is most often used. Historically the name probably derives from the Romans who would use a lead disc to draw lines on a papyrus scroll and then wrote across the lines with a tiny brush called pencillus. It was 1564 in Borrowdale, Eng., during a violent electric storm that up-rooted trees and uncovered a vast supply of pure graphite (thought then to be a form of lead) and by 1565 a German-Swiss naturalist, Konrad von Gesner had attached graphite to a wooden holder to make notes and sketches. Today, amid predictions that the household pencil is on its way out (because of ball-point pens, the typewriter, computers, etc.) one typical pencil can trace a 35-mile long line or write no fewer than 45,000 words. Say -with a couple of pencils, sufficient paper; time and talent, the great American novel could be wj-itten!! SALE Saturdays are interesting because on that day you can jump in your car and go all over town to quite a few garage or yard sales. Bette Stearman and friends are going to have one Saturday, May 22nd, at 115 Hickory St., from 8 to 12 in the a.m.. HOSPITALIZED Mavis Bennett, retired High School teacher, had some eye surgery last week and is now home recouperating. Get real well quick. Mavis, comes from her many friends, neighbors and family. UTAH VISITORS Michelle Clark is showing off that new little baby boy born in April to some friends from Enoch, Utah. They were Edna and Franklin Jones who were in Henderson for a few days last week. CONDOLENCES Wish to extend condolences to Rose and Arland Sargent. Rose's father died last week in Caliente, Nevada of a heart attack. We know that he will be missed, SURGERY Delia Scobleof McGill, Nevada is at the home of Valene and Harold Scoble recovering after back surgery in Las Vegas hospital. Delia is Harold's mom and we send out many get well wishes for her swift recovery. Delia is also the sister of long time resident, Amy Dickinson. -r RECIPE Take 2 heaping cups of patience 1 heartful of love 2 handsful of generosity Dash of laughter 1 headful of understanding Sprinkle generously with kindness Add plenty of faith and mix well Spread over a period of a lifetime And serve everybody you can. BIRTHDAYS Valdez, Burl Bardin, Patricia Hyde, Joey McBride, Iris Neilson, Russell N. Moore, Tom Bennett, Kim Hiar, Pauline Bigler, Ilija Ilic, Josh Shepherd, Tommy Freeman, Bob Proffitt. May 26 Larry Goldston, Mark Farnsworth, Danny Farnsworth, Ralph Danise, Bill Henry, Kirk Hafen, Barbara Whetstone, Denise Miner, Debbie Murphy, Michael King, Rebecca Brown, Paige Neilson, Joy Anderson, Ronald Gill, Russell Gubler. May 27 -iValene Scoble, Tullie Prisbrey, Sharyn ^Smith, Rick Knappenberger, Leslie Leavitt. Dorene England, Lori Brown, Rodney Burr, Paul Orton, Brenda Taney, Robert Henry, Jr., Kenneth D. Hanrahan, Arik Miles Kozlowski, Benjamin Simpkins. r ANNIVERSARIES May 20 Dennis and Sharon Groft; Dave and Shirley Buck. May 21 R.L. and Helen Smoot, Wendle and Ruby Hatch. May 22 Ray ahd Linda Clark, David and Connie Rowley, Richard and Connie Albright. May 23 Eugene and Bonnie Fry, Ricky and Debby Hunt; Phyllis and George Diether; Eldon and Esther Chase. May 24 • Ron and Sue Phillips. May 26 Curley and Beryl Francis; Neil and Wanda Twitchell, Mandy and Selida Stevens; Mr. and Mrs. Don Grossardt; Jack and Willa Caldwell. May 27 Delbert and Dixie Blanchard; Julie and Chris Smith, Rich and Mary Knappenberger; Wyman and Alice Ray; Larry and Marilyn Utley; Gordon and Angela Reno. May 20 Vilate Homer, Brian Alfred Tobler, Nancy Huffington, Lee Sanders, Wm. J. Holgate, Aaron Scott DeGraf, Waylon Shaw, Norman Close, Pat Madsen, Robbie Watts, Darren Swartzlander, LaVerda Daughtery, Foy Seegmiller, Lynn Kirk, Heather McCall, Shane Stratton, Terri Lee Goodale, Actor Jimmie Stewart is 74 today. May 21 Dana Sheehan, Mike Bowen, Lynette Weight, David Roundy, Evelyn Jones, Marie Morley, Jeff Anderson, Laurel M. Brown, Martha Darrow, Lisa Long, Vonda Morton, Eugene Lambert, Wilba (Billie) Clark, and also actor Raymond Burr. May 22 Vernea Walker, Brian Gill, Shannon Carducci, Linda Clark, Starr Solomon, Hilda Hobbs, Jason Stephens, David Hall, Walter G. Smith. Shannon Walker, Heather Neilson, Gary Stewart, Milissa Mills all share a birthday with Sir Lawrence Olivier, actor, who is 75 on this day. May 23 Kaylyn Lords, John May, Ronald Gubler, Madalyn Schmutz, David Neal, Julie Poulsen, Elaine Tannehill, Reagan Dennett, Kristina Mahaffey, Sandy Cocks, Ron Brimhall, Dianne Walters, Emily Brubaker, LaMar Stoker, Douglas Stoker, Kelly Webb, Ross F. Purcell, Debbie Lamb, Paris Watson Chavez, Donna Gillies. May 24 Rachel Sillitoe, Eola Brodie, Robyn Rowland, George L. Schmutz, Joshua Brandon, Mildred Christy, Kenneth Simkins, Shirley Sandin, James Norvill, Robert Proffitt, Nelson Pratt. May 25 Craig Miller, Harold Rey Call, Tony Elks Host Benefit Rsh Fry and Dance There will be a fish fry and dance at the Henderson Elks Lodge on May 29. Senior citizens and children under 12 will onlv be charged $1.50 all other adults will bej charged $3 for their dinner. Dancingwill startat9 p,m, to the music of Randy Anderson. Entry fee for the dance will be the purchase of a raffle ticket on an AM FM stereo phonograph for only $1 per ticket. All profits from this gala event go to support the Nevada State Elks P.EO. Convention Held Delegates from 28 chapters of the Philanthropic Educational Organization Sisterhood of Nevada gathered in Las Vegas on May 6 and 7 for a state convention conducted by Mrs. Ford L. Gilbert of Henderson, state president. Reflecting her religious background in working several decades with her late husband, who was a Methodist minister in Las Vegas and Henderson, she chose an inspirational theme for the conference. Business sessions and workshops were climaxed with a banquet at the Sahara Hotel, headquarters for the 77 delegates. Husbands of members joined the festivities, at which Anthony Thomas and Cindy Hubert, presented a musical program. George Gilbert of Las Vegas, son of the president, was master of ceremonies, and her daughter, Mrs. James W. Porter, served as a page and guard. J^ew state officers installed were: president, Doris Selbig of Reno; first vice president, Ethel McNeely of Reno; second vice president, Shirley Brown of Las Vegas; organizer, Mary Lou Noel of Carson City; corresponding secretary, Alice Parson of Las Vegas; treasurer, Mary Aaronson of Sparks; and recording secretary, Anita Bray of Hawthorne, The banquet was the occasion for a reunion of the family of Mrs. Gilbert, Among those attending were her sons anddaughter and spouses and several grandchildren, including: Messrs, and MesdamesJamesW. Porter, James K. Porter, Alan Calvert, George Gilbert, and Stephen Gilbert; and Ford Van Gilbert, Paul Porter, and Cynthia Porter. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Corcoran of Westminister, Calif., brother in law and sister of Mrs. Gilbert, also were present. Two charter members of Chapter R, Henderson, returned for the conference. They were Marjorie Ivary of Ferndale, Wash., and Jean Arkell of Hailey, Idaho. major project "Amblypia" lazy eye in children. So far in Henderson our nurse Joanne Simonsen has screened over one hundred children between the ages of 4 and 7 and referred five percent for further testing. This is all done free thanks to the support given to the Elks major project. Dinner starts at 5 p,m. at the Elks Lodge Hall on East Lake Mead Blvd. come and enjoy. "Pool Chlor Makes It Nice b Eas/* WEEKLY CHEMICAL SERVICE 25 JIO per month with INITIAL STARTljP FEE '30i)0 Includes ail necessary chemicals to maintain proper water balance 6 POOL CHLOR OF NEVADA. INC 362-8295 :6 SPEAR Pool Service & Repair Co. PROFESSIONAL POOL SERVICE AND REPAIRS CALL US b SEE JUST HOW REASONABLE OUR WEEKLY POOL CLEANING SERVICE CAN BE SPEAR POOL SERVICE &REPAK CO7 362-8295 Ikxxiuflve A Wood drive will be heli Friday, May 21 ft-oat>7p,m,atStRose de Ltea Hospital. Th blood will be proctod by the United Blood Services. Anyoao Boy donate blood for tko drive. The drive will bo kold In the annex of the heOfMtol. CONORATULATIONS WOLU£$ \ Rep up the $ood wor Your eyes really deserve BRx-Quality ... the sunwear with a difference. You can get a broad choice of superior lenses —polarized, tints in many colors, photochromies. In Rx or piano (non-Rx). And a wide choice of frames styled to look best on you. And expert fitting foi extra comfort. That's the way to give your eyes a break in the sun. If you're not sure your prescriptton is up-to-date, see your eye doctor soon. A littia flour mixad into the rtntaini of mlt•d chocolate in the pen cen get the lait bit of chocolate out of the pan and into the cake batter. MEN'S ri SHOP 565-6421 Safeway Shopping Center Boulder Highway Nen^rson HOURS OHH 9 6 MOWOtT TNeU S/kTURO/tT NPV Available at BRx Authorized Professional Distributors or AOUALITY EYEWEAR SINCE 1913 See your Yellow Pages under Opticians SpfVntt *"*Jic\a*\ St. Rose de Lima Prof. Bldg. SUlW\?rchar,.,vu. 564-2519 ,\ntoSuwtnr

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Puge 10 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, May SO, IMS Green Vatey Plaza Famite Shopping Center for many Thursday, May 20.1982 Henderson Rome News, Henderson, Nevada Page 11 i^SEWELL PRODUCTION •• The Hrst grades at Chester T. Sewell school will present their show today and tonight. (See Story). Shown is a scene from the musical. On the front row are Danny Cooper, Correy Stevens, and Matthew Mills. The flowers on the back row are Brigett Bagwell, Amy Fannin and Tiffany Root. The two giants are Louis Pizano and Mickey Macrae. The Selfish Giant To Be Presented At Sewell ) An Oscar Wilde fairytale, "The Selfish Giant," will be performed by first grade students of Chester T Sewell elementary school, today and tonight in the multipurpose room of the school. The performances are set for 9:30 and at 7 p.m. About 80 students from the first grades of Mrs. Campbell, Mrs. Harward, and Mrs. Peeples are involved in acting, dancing and singing. Miss McDonald will be at the piano and is also directing the music. Those involved include Ida Toombs and Loring Lampkey for the banner; Leon West and Jason Cox and Florence Pustai, announcers; Mickey Macrae and Johnny Martinez, first giant; Luis Pizano and Daniel Allen,second giant; flowers are Brigette Bagwell, Kendy Burke, Monica Salazar, Frankie Busk, Tiffany Root, Stacy Huff, Shelly McFarland, Christina Humble, Annette Meyer, Amy Fannin, Pamela Ilic, Misty Yeoman, Heather Addington and Angela Parker. The children involved include Edith Servin, Levi Gregory, Victoria Kilfoy, Mark Miller, Kevin Tovar, Christina Booten, John Walker, David Owen, Russell Lamb, Jason Walters, Sheldon Petty, Julie Mize, Lydia Gutierrez, Jimmy Holland, Heather Robb, Travis Carter, Angela Siegfried, Jamie Hemenway, 'Bill Berry, Jay Steward, Aaron Peeples, Jennifer Bowling, Jeremy "^elky, Sharon McLeod, Carmen Flores, Adam Brimhall, Alma Flores, and Mario Ramirez. Snow children include Lisa Strickland, Christian Bauer, Don Oettinger, Bradley Eighmy, Aaron Hildreth, Christina Hbbbs, Lucia Chan, Tae Lee Howard, Michelle Liggett, Raymond Streeter, Adam Brose, Billy MORE CITIZENSHIP WINNERS Also winning good citizenship awards for the past two weeks at Nate Mack are front row, left to right, John Yasinskl, Daniel Lyerly, Tricia Doss and Kristi Bentley. Second row, left to right, are Daniel Freid, Sara James, Todd Cox, Richard Strafella, Valerie Janes and Nyree Hartman. Back row, left to right, are Melissa Haertel, Elke Ruz, Carrie Martin, Susan Nicholson, Frankie Sansone and Debbie Neville. ^mm^. NATE MACK CITIZENSHIP WINNERS Winners of good citizenship awards at Nate Mack Elementary for the past two weeks are, firont row, left to right, Rob Rice and Shelly Hoard. Second row, left to right, Jeaune Yarde, David Shultes, Gary Nelson, Charles Herendeen and Matthew Knight. Back row, left to right, are Rebecca Albright, Lisa Tiberi, Cary Monger, Michelle Strafella, Ji m Avan ce. Phillip Gamer and Brad Owena. King, Brandon Fruth and Jay Stewart. Bees are Danny Cooper, Carrey Stevens and Matthew Mills; Robins are David Kraft and Brian Smith; fairies are LaVera Wilson, Billy Shuford, Jason Sriski, Railene Stalter, Chris Allshouse, Shawn Moore, Carrie McKinney and Ernest Wayne. The closing will be by Jeffrey Reynolds and Tina Chambers. Special thanks have been extended to Elaine Langford for background scenery; Laura Johnson and Ayesha Hall for dance and choreography and Brent Corgan for the lights. Rehabililation of Handicapped By Thomas W. Pauken Director of ACTION Robert J. Smithdas^i poet, an author, a philosopher, and he holds three honorary doctoral degrees in the humanities. His major area of activity is rehabilitation of the handicapped. It's a subject with which he is well acquainted, for Smithdas is both deaf and blind and has been since the age of four. As a child whose world had suddenly gone black and silent, it was imperative that he go to school and in this case the Western Pennsylvania School for the Blind*. From there he entered the famous Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Mass. At Perkins he achieved a nearly perfect scholastic average, and although deaf-blind students do not usually attempt the complexities of undergraduate work, Robert was anxious to take on the challenge, with his teachers encouraging'him to do so. The result was that in 1950, Smithdas graduated cum laude with a B.A. from St. John's University in Jamaica, N.Y., the first deaf-blind student to earn a college degree since Helen Keller received hers from RadclifTe a half century before. Smithdas was not content; he was determined to reach higher, and three years later he was awarded his Master's degree at New York University, the first deaf-blind student ever to attain such academic distinction. He could not have accomplished any of It alone, and The convenience and proximity of the Green Valley Plaza shopping center has made it a favorite stop for many residents of the Henderson area. Even Boulder City residents travel to patronize the 10-acre Green Valley Plaza, located in Nevada's largest master-planned community. According to Nancy Nobel, a Boulder City resident, "we need more shopping places closer to Boulder City like this one." Noble and a friend carpool to the shopping center each week to shop at Smith's Super Food King and visit some of the other stores in Green Valley Plaza, including Country Classics Western Wear, Mario's Hair Design II, Merluzzi Dance Studio, Al Phillips The Cleaner, Carrara Cards, Videorama, Dirty Dog Inn, Anne's Flowers, Escape Travel, Green Valley Grocery and Valley Bank. The Omelet House restaurant recently signed a lease in phase two of the shopping center, and will be opening this summer. _^^ "I'm excited abo>^the Omelet House," Noble continued, and so is Barbara Beier, a Green Valley resident. "I'm anxious for the Omelet House to open," Beier said. Beier is happy about Carrara Cards, also, she said. A mixture of American and British greeting cards, Carrara Cards reminds her of Seattle, Wash., where she previously lived, because it carries a number of imported items. Shopping at Smith's Super Food King is a luxury many Green Valley residents have waited for anxiously. "I'm glad I don't have to drive so far to get my groceries," Beier said. Susan Beglinger, also a Green Valley resident, agreed. "It (Smith's Food King) is convenient." She noted, too, that having a drycleaners close to home is rather "nice." Pam Starr, who has lived in Green Valley two years, said she feels Green Valley Plaza, when complete, will be even more than a shopping center for the community. "I'm excited about getting more merchants out here," Starr explained, noting that "What I like best about the shopping center is that it will be a definer center of the community, or more of a meeting place for residente." The success of Green Valley Plaza is exactly what American Nevada Corporation, overall developers of Green Valley, had planned, according to Bob Campbell, senior vice president for American Nevada. "Green Valley Plaza provides a pleasant shopping environment where people can find the goods and services they need," Campbell explained. The quality of merchants located in Green Valley Plaza has been important to American Nevada, Campbell said. "We're trying to get a good balance of shops," he noted. "We've been very fortunate so far. We anticipate that this will continue, also." At the present time. Green Valley Plaza is approximately 60 percent leased and steadily growing, according to Lynn Owens, sales represehtative of Coldwell Banker, the leasing agent for the shopping center. The first phase of the shopping center was complete in November of 1981, while phase two is in the finishing stages. Containing approximately 26,900 square feet of in-line shop space. Green Valley Plaza also has space available for free-standing buildings, such as Valley Bank, which has been open since last year, and First Federal Savings and Loan, expected to begin construction in the near future. The popularity and sue'Cess of Green Valley Plaza continues the high quality standards developed in Green Valley's 20-year master plan. The master plan provides not only the finest quality living environment, but also the ultimate in retail and commercial needs. —to aid him, he had had the unstinting assistance of assigned volunteers. They recited class lectures to him, using the manual alphabet; transcribed his texts into braille; accompanied him on his rounds, always present, always ready to help sustain his efforts. He could never thank them enough. Having specialized in vocational guidance and rehabilitation, Smithdas went to work for the Industrial Home of the Blind, where he had studied before entering college. Involved in the home's community relations program, he was inspirational proof to other handicapped students how an individual can overcome physical adversity. Writing had always been a means of expression for him, and his autobiolgraphy, Life At My Fingertips, published in 1958, brought considerable acclaim, as a member of the Poetry Society of America and a fellow of the International Institute of Arts and Letters he was named Poet of the Year for 1960-1961. His book of poems City of the Heart, speaks to the heart, for, as he says, "My heart sang (these poems) to me over the years ~ because poignant moods or powerful emotions made me ache to crystallize my thoughts and feelings into verbal expres-' sions ..." His second book of poems. Shared Beauty, is soon to be published. A winner of presidential citiations and a member ot key committees to aid the deaf-blind, Smithdas considers his most important achievement to date was to play a major role in developing the legislation by which Congress voted in 1967 to establish the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults at Sands Point, N.Y. The Center is a unique and vital training facility, the only one of its kind. It houses up to fifty deaf-blind clients at one time, who come under the tutelage of a dedicated staff of experts assisted by trained volunteers, many of whom are high school age. As the Center's Director of Community Education, Dr. Smithdas spends a great deal of time on the lecture circuit. He travels without help, using public transportation, impressing and holding audiences with his remarkable capabilities and stimulating personality. He's a swimmer and an avid angler also, but perhaps most important of all, he's married. His wife, Michelle, is deaf-blind, too, having lost her hearing at 16 and her eyesight in an accident five years later. She entered the Helen Keller Center in 1972, and on her first day there she met Robert Smithdas.' Perhaps it was love at first touch; they were married in 1975, and today Mr. and Mrs. Smithdas reside in their' own home in Port Washington not far from the center,' where she is also employed as an assistant instructor. City Summer Swim Sdiedule Summer Learn-To-Swim registration will be onducted Thursday, and Friday, from 10 a.m. to 2 |p.m. at the Civic Center Gymnasium Area and on aturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. also at the Civic penter Gymnasium Area. B.N.I. POOL SESSION I June 7-18 9 a.m. Beginning Swimmer 10 a.m. Beginning Advanced 11 a.m. Beginning Parents-Tots SESSION II June 21-July 2 9 a.m. Advanced Intermediate 10 a.m. Beginning Advanced 11 a.m. Beginning Parents-Tots SESSION III July 5-16 9 a.m. Beginning Swimmer 10 A.m. Beginning Advanced \ 11 a.m. Beginning Parents-Tots SESSION IV July 19-30 9 a.m. Beginning'Intermediate 10 a.m. Beginning Advanced '' 11 a.m, Beginning Parents-Tots SESSION V August 2-13 v, 9 a.m. Beginning Swimmer 10 a.m. Beginning Advanced ',' Ha.m. Beginning-Parents-Tots Swimnastics: B.M.I. Pool Class 1 Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,j8 to 9 a.m. Class 2 Tuesday and Thursday, 8 to 9 a.m. Parent and Tot, Beginners and Advanced Beginners Classes will be $5 per two-week session and Intermediate and Swimmer Classes will be $6 per session. Session dates, classes and locations are as follows. LORIN WILLIAMS POOL Beginning Advanced Beginning Beginning Intermediate Beginning Parents-Tots Advanced Beginning Advanced Beginning Beginning Swimmer Beginning Parents-Tots Advanced Beginning Advanced Advanced • Beginning Intermediate Beginning Parents-Tots Advanced Beginning Advanced Beginning Advanced Swimmer Beginning Parents-Tots Advanced Beginning • Advanced Beginning Advanced • Intermediate Beginning Parents-Tots Adanced Five week session starts June 14 SVn(Jronized Swimming. Water Polo, and Swim Team times and days will be announced later. Basebal/Softball Scoreboard Pee Wee Baseball League Standings Team W L Astros 3 0 Bears 4 1 Gamblers ..4 1 ^ayhawks 4 1 Angels 3 X Giants. 1 2 Hawks : 1 3 Blue Angels 0 4 Yankees 0 4 Titans 0 5 Includes 5-18 games. Our nation's first ivational monument is Devil's Tower, 865 feet high and located in the Black Hills Region of Wyoming. It became a national monument in 1906. Q. Con you nam* all the t*ams BiUy Martin has managed in Ms career? Billy began with the MinneeoU Twint, then went on t Detroit, Texas, New York Yenkeea (twice) •od the Odtland As. • • • Q. Who played in the 1969 N.L. Championship Series fA. The New York MeU shocked the Atlanta Bravea 3 games to none. Men's Slow Pitch Softball League Standings Team W L" J&K 5 0 Workclothes 4 1 Centel 4 1 womack .^,:::;:....4 i Johns Chevron 3 2\, Skyline 2 3 Goldmine 2 3 Perrys 2 3 Skyline-Quickie 2 3 Todds 1 4 Sanders : 1 4 Sportsman 0 5 Includes 5-18 games. Midget Baseball League Standings Team W t T Blue Jays 4 0 Mets 3 0 1 Angels 2 1 1 Astros 3 2 Bears 1 2 Royals U2 Phillies..... :: 1 3 Cardinals 1 4 Bruins 0 2 2 Includes 5-18 games. Industrial Slow Pitch Softball League Standings Team W L Pepcon 5 0 State 4 1 Stauffer 4 1 Reduction 3 1 Montrose 3 2 Levi 2 3 Gen Star 1 4 Melting 1 4 Technical 1 4 KerrMcGee 0 4 Includes 5-18 games. Women's Slow Pitch Softball Uague Standings Team W L JCs-Rose ;....3 0 J&K 2 0 TJs-Todd's.... 2 1 Levi Strauss 1 1 Moly Corp 1 1 • Perry's 1 1 Baldy's 0 .3 Hoe & Hammer 0 3 Includes 5-18 games. ^. Lines From The Lanes By Ruth Soehlke SUMMER LEAGUES FORMING: The time is right now to sign up at the desk for a spot of your choice of the Summer Leagues which will be starting now and into the first week in June; or call Henderson Bowl at 565-7712 for information. Also available is Saturday night Blue Chip stamp bowling for anyone who likes to get a little something extra/or their efforts. WIBC CONVENTION ACTION; There were some 20 proposed amendments brought before the 3466 delegates to approve or disapprove and following are those that most effect local association: Chapter II, Article XII, Section A changed to read ... The local association bylaws may be amended at the fall membership meeting and the annual meeting by a majority vote of members present and voting, providing the procedure in Section B has been followed. Chapter IX, League Rules: Rule 102e add as a new paragraph: Failure on the part of the league secretary to comply with the provisions of this rule or fulfill other duties as may be prescribed by the league's board of directors may be cause for removal from office and or suspension from membership in the WIBC. WIBC WORKSHOP: There was considerable discussion on the possibility of adopting a rule (o iriclude multiple memberships, wherein a member could join several associations and participate in tournaments'in each. Advantages would be the increase in local association dues, also tournament entries could increase providing larger prize funds. Some miestions arose concerning accuracy of records, associations would have to issue a card for multiple membership bowlers, some might inadvertantly purchase more than one WIBC card, also the same member could represent more than one association at state and WIBC but have only one vote. Think about this as it will be voted on at a future convention. Association dues can be changed in September if Article 10 of bylaws is adhered to. When local dues are increased members act only on local dues and should not include total dues. HIGH SCRATCH SCORES: The high scratch scores in WIBC leagues and tournaments through March 31, 1982 include 42 ladies with perfect 300 games (Letitia Johnson of Napa, Ca bowled two perfect games); Patty Ann of Arlington Heights, III. 837 three game series; Five-woman team game 1160; Five-woman 3 game series 3250. DID YOU KNOW: Fouls can be called only by bowlers on the lanes involved, not by someone on the next lanes. Illegal pinfall can be called by anyone who notices. The 1983 convention in Las Vegas will be the first year that the former President's Party will heretofore be known as the Delegates Party Following the vote for the 1986 convention and tournament the Gold Ball was presented to Las Vegas WBA president Gerry Perry by the St. Louis WBA represehtative. This is a nice ceremony first inaugurated in 1940. After you al 1 join the WIBC tournament entrants in Las Vegas next spring your interest will grow and you will want to become a regular participant. The 1984 tournament is in Niagara Falls, N.Y., 1985 in Toledo, Ohio and the winner among Indianapolis, Ind, Tucson, Ariz, and Orange County, Ca. was Orange County for 1986. Make your plans for 1983 now and enter very early. Being a delegate to WIBC is an honor and a privilege and I sincerely want to thank every person who supported the fund raising in any way as I truly appreciated being Henderson WBA representative. AAU. Qualifying Wresding Tourney Saturday at Boys' Club Cincinnati RedS Hold Tryout Camps The Henderson Boys' Club will host an A.A.U. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL QUALIFYING WRESTLING TOURNAMENT Saturday for Senior and a^e group A.A.U. wrestlers. The tournament will qualify successful participants for the southwest regional championships later this year in Ventura, Calif. Weigh-ins begin at 8 a.m. Saturday and continue to 9 a.m. with Senior wrestling competition beginning at 9:30 p.m. Tournament entry fees are $5 with an A.A.U. card, $11 for tournament fees and an A.A.U. card... Senior division wrestling is divided into three high school age groups, advanced, elite and junior world. Other age group categories begin at eight and under and progress to Senior division and include bantam, midget, junior and intermediate. Medals for first, second and third will be awarded in each weight and age group and most outstanding wrestlers awards will be given in the Senior division and in each age group. Contact tournament director Jim Duschen fo any further information. Dunlgan Named^D^^M'Uoy ot tne n/ionm' The Cincinnati Reds will hold a tryout camp inLas Vegasat9a.m. at Valley High School Saturday. The Cincinnati Reds 'hold tryout camps for two reasons, to sign players to professional contracts, and toget leads on good young ballplayers whose progress can be followed in -the futurer Sixteen year old Jack Dunigan has been named as the Henderson Boys' Club Boy of the Month for April. Jack resides with his grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rhodes of Henderson. A sophomore at Basic High School, Jack counts math as his favorite subject. While in high schooll, he wants to make the varsity football and basketball teams. Jack has been a member of the Boys' Club for several years and is active as a Keystone Club member and is currently working as an assistant coach with the Twins in the Biddy Tee-Ball League. He was also an outstanding •forward and the league's leading scorer in the Senior Basketball League. In the future. Jack would like to be a c arpeqter as a career. Royal Neighbors Meet Royjl Neighbors, of America meet the first and third Tuesdays of each month %t Gilbert Hall, .back of Community Giurch at 7:30.P.M. Ninteen members were present at ihe Mv, 18th meeting, with two guests, Almeda Deen and Anha Bauer. Almeda graciously supplied music, for ut m the absence of our pianist. Helen Larson, who recently submitted tQ eye surgery. Thank ytMil Almedal Speedy Recovery Helen! Xrs. Daisy Dajilels. Supreme Director from Supreme Camp. Davenport, Iowa, will vish.our local camp 107S^ at the June 1st meeting. We beg each member to support your Camp by your attendance. There can be no harvest-unless seeds ate plantedl Lets make SPECIAL EFFORT sovhig seeds that.will mature and produce a Bountiful Harve8t-'.by our very presence and assistance. WE CAN REAP ONLY WHAT WE SOWl Mabel Newton and Cleo McQonald served delicious refreshments. Thelma Pullen won the Special Travel prize of a beautiful afghan. donated by Angie Hayward. Lets show our "ROYALITY" by being PRESENTPUNCTUAL and PERSISTENT, at each meeting, doing, our It is physically impossible for a scout to see every player in his territory play. The tryout camp is the perfect vehicle for a scout to see the unseen ballplayer. Many fine, unknown ballplayers have been signed out of tryout camps. For example, Dan Driessen, the Red's' first baseman, was discovered at a tryout camp. utmost. Expecting Record Attendance June 1st. See you.at 7:30. Anyone needing a ride-CALL A NEIGHBOR. Age limit will be from 15 to 22 and players must bring their own uniforms, shoes, and gloves. High school sophomores and juniors are most welcome to attend. Players on Legion clubs must have written permission from their coaches or Legion Commanders, and these notices mu st—he^ -prese*td upon arrival at the park. Contact Ralph Meder at 871-0726 if you have any questions. Start seedlings indoors m smtll pifitic-covtred con tainrt by sunny windows. I^g? fe* ce(Mii' Z3 Army Si Hrndrrwn (702) 565-9348 HMM 5*4-3197 rirl. l*t k Bruc 20,000 yards of in stock fabric at l/2?tlcc I U|Aolstwy*DrapffY } ^OistoM Owihtd ladspraods I m Naodbovfls ?
PAGE 11

Puge 10 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, May SO, IMS Green Vatey Plaza Famite Shopping Center for many Thursday, May 20.1982 Henderson Rome News, Henderson, Nevada Page 11 i^SEWELL PRODUCTION •• The Hrst grades at Chester T. Sewell school will present their show today and tonight. (See Story). Shown is a scene from the musical. On the front row are Danny Cooper, Correy Stevens, and Matthew Mills. The flowers on the back row are Brigett Bagwell, Amy Fannin and Tiffany Root. The two giants are Louis Pizano and Mickey Macrae. The Selfish Giant To Be Presented At Sewell ) An Oscar Wilde fairytale, "The Selfish Giant," will be performed by first grade students of Chester T Sewell elementary school, today and tonight in the multipurpose room of the school. The performances are set for 9:30 and at 7 p.m. About 80 students from the first grades of Mrs. Campbell, Mrs. Harward, and Mrs. Peeples are involved in acting, dancing and singing. Miss McDonald will be at the piano and is also directing the music. Those involved include Ida Toombs and Loring Lampkey for the banner; Leon West and Jason Cox and Florence Pustai, announcers; Mickey Macrae and Johnny Martinez, first giant; Luis Pizano and Daniel Allen,second giant; flowers are Brigette Bagwell, Kendy Burke, Monica Salazar, Frankie Busk, Tiffany Root, Stacy Huff, Shelly McFarland, Christina Humble, Annette Meyer, Amy Fannin, Pamela Ilic, Misty Yeoman, Heather Addington and Angela Parker. The children involved include Edith Servin, Levi Gregory, Victoria Kilfoy, Mark Miller, Kevin Tovar, Christina Booten, John Walker, David Owen, Russell Lamb, Jason Walters, Sheldon Petty, Julie Mize, Lydia Gutierrez, Jimmy Holland, Heather Robb, Travis Carter, Angela Siegfried, Jamie Hemenway, 'Bill Berry, Jay Steward, Aaron Peeples, Jennifer Bowling, Jeremy "^elky, Sharon McLeod, Carmen Flores, Adam Brimhall, Alma Flores, and Mario Ramirez. Snow children include Lisa Strickland, Christian Bauer, Don Oettinger, Bradley Eighmy, Aaron Hildreth, Christina Hbbbs, Lucia Chan, Tae Lee Howard, Michelle Liggett, Raymond Streeter, Adam Brose, Billy MORE CITIZENSHIP WINNERS Also winning good citizenship awards for the past two weeks at Nate Mack are front row, left to right, John Yasinskl, Daniel Lyerly, Tricia Doss and Kristi Bentley. Second row, left to right, are Daniel Freid, Sara James, Todd Cox, Richard Strafella, Valerie Janes and Nyree Hartman. Back row, left to right, are Melissa Haertel, Elke Ruz, Carrie Martin, Susan Nicholson, Frankie Sansone and Debbie Neville. ^mm^. NATE MACK CITIZENSHIP WINNERS Winners of good citizenship awards at Nate Mack Elementary for the past two weeks are, firont row, left to right, Rob Rice and Shelly Hoard. Second row, left to right, Jeaune Yarde, David Shultes, Gary Nelson, Charles Herendeen and Matthew Knight. Back row, left to right, are Rebecca Albright, Lisa Tiberi, Cary Monger, Michelle Strafella, Ji m Avan ce. Phillip Gamer and Brad Owena. King, Brandon Fruth and Jay Stewart. Bees are Danny Cooper, Carrey Stevens and Matthew Mills; Robins are David Kraft and Brian Smith; fairies are LaVera Wilson, Billy Shuford, Jason Sriski, Railene Stalter, Chris Allshouse, Shawn Moore, Carrie McKinney and Ernest Wayne. The closing will be by Jeffrey Reynolds and Tina Chambers. Special thanks have been extended to Elaine Langford for background scenery; Laura Johnson and Ayesha Hall for dance and choreography and Brent Corgan for the lights. Rehabililation of Handicapped By Thomas W. Pauken Director of ACTION Robert J. Smithdas^i poet, an author, a philosopher, and he holds three honorary doctoral degrees in the humanities. His major area of activity is rehabilitation of the handicapped. It's a subject with which he is well acquainted, for Smithdas is both deaf and blind and has been since the age of four. As a child whose world had suddenly gone black and silent, it was imperative that he go to school and in this case the Western Pennsylvania School for the Blind*. From there he entered the famous Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Mass. At Perkins he achieved a nearly perfect scholastic average, and although deaf-blind students do not usually attempt the complexities of undergraduate work, Robert was anxious to take on the challenge, with his teachers encouraging'him to do so. The result was that in 1950, Smithdas graduated cum laude with a B.A. from St. John's University in Jamaica, N.Y., the first deaf-blind student to earn a college degree since Helen Keller received hers from RadclifTe a half century before. Smithdas was not content; he was determined to reach higher, and three years later he was awarded his Master's degree at New York University, the first deaf-blind student ever to attain such academic distinction. He could not have accomplished any of It alone, and The convenience and proximity of the Green Valley Plaza shopping center has made it a favorite stop for many residents of the Henderson area. Even Boulder City residents travel to patronize the 10-acre Green Valley Plaza, located in Nevada's largest master-planned community. According to Nancy Nobel, a Boulder City resident, "we need more shopping places closer to Boulder City like this one." Noble and a friend carpool to the shopping center each week to shop at Smith's Super Food King and visit some of the other stores in Green Valley Plaza, including Country Classics Western Wear, Mario's Hair Design II, Merluzzi Dance Studio, Al Phillips The Cleaner, Carrara Cards, Videorama, Dirty Dog Inn, Anne's Flowers, Escape Travel, Green Valley Grocery and Valley Bank. The Omelet House restaurant recently signed a lease in phase two of the shopping center, and will be opening this summer. _^^ "I'm excited abo>^the Omelet House," Noble continued, and so is Barbara Beier, a Green Valley resident. "I'm anxious for the Omelet House to open," Beier said. Beier is happy about Carrara Cards, also, she said. A mixture of American and British greeting cards, Carrara Cards reminds her of Seattle, Wash., where she previously lived, because it carries a number of imported items. Shopping at Smith's Super Food King is a luxury many Green Valley residents have waited for anxiously. "I'm glad I don't have to drive so far to get my groceries," Beier said. Susan Beglinger, also a Green Valley resident, agreed. "It (Smith's Food King) is convenient." She noted, too, that having a drycleaners close to home is rather "nice." Pam Starr, who has lived in Green Valley two years, said she feels Green Valley Plaza, when complete, will be even more than a shopping center for the community. "I'm excited about getting more merchants out here," Starr explained, noting that "What I like best about the shopping center is that it will be a definer center of the community, or more of a meeting place for residente." The success of Green Valley Plaza is exactly what American Nevada Corporation, overall developers of Green Valley, had planned, according to Bob Campbell, senior vice president for American Nevada. "Green Valley Plaza provides a pleasant shopping environment where people can find the goods and services they need," Campbell explained. The quality of merchants located in Green Valley Plaza has been important to American Nevada, Campbell said. "We're trying to get a good balance of shops," he noted. "We've been very fortunate so far. We anticipate that this will continue, also." At the present time. Green Valley Plaza is approximately 60 percent leased and steadily growing, according to Lynn Owens, sales represehtative of Coldwell Banker, the leasing agent for the shopping center. The first phase of the shopping center was complete in November of 1981, while phase two is in the finishing stages. Containing approximately 26,900 square feet of in-line shop space. Green Valley Plaza also has space available for free-standing buildings, such as Valley Bank, which has been open since last year, and First Federal Savings and Loan, expected to begin construction in the near future. The popularity and sue'Cess of Green Valley Plaza continues the high quality standards developed in Green Valley's 20-year master plan. The master plan provides not only the finest quality living environment, but also the ultimate in retail and commercial needs. —to aid him, he had had the unstinting assistance of assigned volunteers. They recited class lectures to him, using the manual alphabet; transcribed his texts into braille; accompanied him on his rounds, always present, always ready to help sustain his efforts. He could never thank them enough. Having specialized in vocational guidance and rehabilitation, Smithdas went to work for the Industrial Home of the Blind, where he had studied before entering college. Involved in the home's community relations program, he was inspirational proof to other handicapped students how an individual can overcome physical adversity. Writing had always been a means of expression for him, and his autobiolgraphy, Life At My Fingertips, published in 1958, brought considerable acclaim, as a member of the Poetry Society of America and a fellow of the International Institute of Arts and Letters he was named Poet of the Year for 1960-1961. His book of poems City of the Heart, speaks to the heart, for, as he says, "My heart sang (these poems) to me over the years ~ because poignant moods or powerful emotions made me ache to crystallize my thoughts and feelings into verbal expres-' sions ..." His second book of poems. Shared Beauty, is soon to be published. A winner of presidential citiations and a member ot key committees to aid the deaf-blind, Smithdas considers his most important achievement to date was to play a major role in developing the legislation by which Congress voted in 1967 to establish the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults at Sands Point, N.Y. The Center is a unique and vital training facility, the only one of its kind. It houses up to fifty deaf-blind clients at one time, who come under the tutelage of a dedicated staff of experts assisted by trained volunteers, many of whom are high school age. As the Center's Director of Community Education, Dr. Smithdas spends a great deal of time on the lecture circuit. He travels without help, using public transportation, impressing and holding audiences with his remarkable capabilities and stimulating personality. He's a swimmer and an avid angler also, but perhaps most important of all, he's married. His wife, Michelle, is deaf-blind, too, having lost her hearing at 16 and her eyesight in an accident five years later. She entered the Helen Keller Center in 1972, and on her first day there she met Robert Smithdas.' Perhaps it was love at first touch; they were married in 1975, and today Mr. and Mrs. Smithdas reside in their' own home in Port Washington not far from the center,' where she is also employed as an assistant instructor. City Summer Swim Sdiedule Summer Learn-To-Swim registration will be onducted Thursday, and Friday, from 10 a.m. to 2 |p.m. at the Civic Center Gymnasium Area and on aturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. also at the Civic penter Gymnasium Area. B.N.I. POOL SESSION I June 7-18 9 a.m. Beginning Swimmer 10 a.m. Beginning Advanced 11 a.m. Beginning Parents-Tots SESSION II June 21-July 2 9 a.m. Advanced Intermediate 10 a.m. Beginning Advanced 11 a.m. Beginning Parents-Tots SESSION III July 5-16 9 a.m. Beginning Swimmer 10 A.m. Beginning Advanced \ 11 a.m. Beginning Parents-Tots SESSION IV July 19-30 9 a.m. Beginning'Intermediate 10 a.m. Beginning Advanced '' 11 a.m, Beginning Parents-Tots SESSION V August 2-13 v, 9 a.m. Beginning Swimmer 10 a.m. Beginning Advanced ',' Ha.m. Beginning-Parents-Tots Swimnastics: B.M.I. Pool Class 1 Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,j8 to 9 a.m. Class 2 Tuesday and Thursday, 8 to 9 a.m. Parent and Tot, Beginners and Advanced Beginners Classes will be $5 per two-week session and Intermediate and Swimmer Classes will be $6 per session. Session dates, classes and locations are as follows. LORIN WILLIAMS POOL Beginning Advanced Beginning Beginning Intermediate Beginning Parents-Tots Advanced Beginning Advanced Beginning Beginning Swimmer Beginning Parents-Tots Advanced Beginning Advanced Advanced • Beginning Intermediate Beginning Parents-Tots Advanced Beginning Advanced Beginning Advanced Swimmer Beginning Parents-Tots Advanced Beginning • Advanced Beginning Advanced • Intermediate Beginning Parents-Tots Adanced Five week session starts June 14 SVn(Jronized Swimming. Water Polo, and Swim Team times and days will be announced later. Basebal/Softball Scoreboard Pee Wee Baseball League Standings Team W L Astros 3 0 Bears 4 1 Gamblers ..4 1 ^ayhawks 4 1 Angels 3 X Giants. 1 2 Hawks : 1 3 Blue Angels 0 4 Yankees 0 4 Titans 0 5 Includes 5-18 games. Our nation's first ivational monument is Devil's Tower, 865 feet high and located in the Black Hills Region of Wyoming. It became a national monument in 1906. Q. Con you nam* all the t*ams BiUy Martin has managed in Ms career? Billy began with the MinneeoU Twint, then went on t Detroit, Texas, New York Yenkeea (twice) •od the Odtland As. • • • Q. Who played in the 1969 N.L. Championship Series fA. The New York MeU shocked the Atlanta Bravea 3 games to none. Men's Slow Pitch Softball League Standings Team W L" J&K 5 0 Workclothes 4 1 Centel 4 1 womack .^,:::;:....4 i Johns Chevron 3 2\, Skyline 2 3 Goldmine 2 3 Perrys 2 3 Skyline-Quickie 2 3 Todds 1 4 Sanders : 1 4 Sportsman 0 5 Includes 5-18 games. Midget Baseball League Standings Team W t T Blue Jays 4 0 Mets 3 0 1 Angels 2 1 1 Astros 3 2 Bears 1 2 Royals U2 Phillies..... :: 1 3 Cardinals 1 4 Bruins 0 2 2 Includes 5-18 games. Industrial Slow Pitch Softball League Standings Team W L Pepcon 5 0 State 4 1 Stauffer 4 1 Reduction 3 1 Montrose 3 2 Levi 2 3 Gen Star 1 4 Melting 1 4 Technical 1 4 KerrMcGee 0 4 Includes 5-18 games. Women's Slow Pitch Softball Uague Standings Team W L JCs-Rose ;....3 0 J&K 2 0 TJs-Todd's.... 2 1 Levi Strauss 1 1 Moly Corp 1 1 • Perry's 1 1 Baldy's 0 .3 Hoe & Hammer 0 3 Includes 5-18 games. ^. Lines From The Lanes By Ruth Soehlke SUMMER LEAGUES FORMING: The time is right now to sign up at the desk for a spot of your choice of the Summer Leagues which will be starting now and into the first week in June; or call Henderson Bowl at 565-7712 for information. Also available is Saturday night Blue Chip stamp bowling for anyone who likes to get a little something extra/or their efforts. WIBC CONVENTION ACTION; There were some 20 proposed amendments brought before the 3466 delegates to approve or disapprove and following are those that most effect local association: Chapter II, Article XII, Section A changed to read ... The local association bylaws may be amended at the fall membership meeting and the annual meeting by a majority vote of members present and voting, providing the procedure in Section B has been followed. Chapter IX, League Rules: Rule 102e add as a new paragraph: Failure on the part of the league secretary to comply with the provisions of this rule or fulfill other duties as may be prescribed by the league's board of directors may be cause for removal from office and or suspension from membership in the WIBC. WIBC WORKSHOP: There was considerable discussion on the possibility of adopting a rule (o iriclude multiple memberships, wherein a member could join several associations and participate in tournaments'in each. Advantages would be the increase in local association dues, also tournament entries could increase providing larger prize funds. Some miestions arose concerning accuracy of records, associations would have to issue a card for multiple membership bowlers, some might inadvertantly purchase more than one WIBC card, also the same member could represent more than one association at state and WIBC but have only one vote. Think about this as it will be voted on at a future convention. Association dues can be changed in September if Article 10 of bylaws is adhered to. When local dues are increased members act only on local dues and should not include total dues. HIGH SCRATCH SCORES: The high scratch scores in WIBC leagues and tournaments through March 31, 1982 include 42 ladies with perfect 300 games (Letitia Johnson of Napa, Ca bowled two perfect games); Patty Ann of Arlington Heights, III. 837 three game series; Five-woman team game 1160; Five-woman 3 game series 3250. DID YOU KNOW: Fouls can be called only by bowlers on the lanes involved, not by someone on the next lanes. Illegal pinfall can be called by anyone who notices. The 1983 convention in Las Vegas will be the first year that the former President's Party will heretofore be known as the Delegates Party Following the vote for the 1986 convention and tournament the Gold Ball was presented to Las Vegas WBA president Gerry Perry by the St. Louis WBA represehtative. This is a nice ceremony first inaugurated in 1940. After you al 1 join the WIBC tournament entrants in Las Vegas next spring your interest will grow and you will want to become a regular participant. The 1984 tournament is in Niagara Falls, N.Y., 1985 in Toledo, Ohio and the winner among Indianapolis, Ind, Tucson, Ariz, and Orange County, Ca. was Orange County for 1986. Make your plans for 1983 now and enter very early. Being a delegate to WIBC is an honor and a privilege and I sincerely want to thank every person who supported the fund raising in any way as I truly appreciated being Henderson WBA representative. AAU. Qualifying Wresding Tourney Saturday at Boys' Club Cincinnati RedS Hold Tryout Camps The Henderson Boys' Club will host an A.A.U. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL QUALIFYING WRESTLING TOURNAMENT Saturday for Senior and a^e group A.A.U. wrestlers. The tournament will qualify successful participants for the southwest regional championships later this year in Ventura, Calif. Weigh-ins begin at 8 a.m. Saturday and continue to 9 a.m. with Senior wrestling competition beginning at 9:30 p.m. Tournament entry fees are $5 with an A.A.U. card, $11 for tournament fees and an A.A.U. card... Senior division wrestling is divided into three high school age groups, advanced, elite and junior world. Other age group categories begin at eight and under and progress to Senior division and include bantam, midget, junior and intermediate. Medals for first, second and third will be awarded in each weight and age group and most outstanding wrestlers awards will be given in the Senior division and in each age group. Contact tournament director Jim Duschen fo any further information. Dunlgan Named^D^^M'Uoy ot tne n/ionm' The Cincinnati Reds will hold a tryout camp inLas Vegasat9a.m. at Valley High School Saturday. The Cincinnati Reds 'hold tryout camps for two reasons, to sign players to professional contracts, and toget leads on good young ballplayers whose progress can be followed in -the futurer Sixteen year old Jack Dunigan has been named as the Henderson Boys' Club Boy of the Month for April. Jack resides with his grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rhodes of Henderson. A sophomore at Basic High School, Jack counts math as his favorite subject. While in high schooll, he wants to make the varsity football and basketball teams. Jack has been a member of the Boys' Club for several years and is active as a Keystone Club member and is currently working as an assistant coach with the Twins in the Biddy Tee-Ball League. He was also an outstanding •forward and the league's leading scorer in the Senior Basketball League. In the future. Jack would like to be a c arpeqter as a career. Royal Neighbors Meet Royjl Neighbors, of America meet the first and third Tuesdays of each month %t Gilbert Hall, .back of Community Giurch at 7:30.P.M. Ninteen members were present at ihe Mv, 18th meeting, with two guests, Almeda Deen and Anha Bauer. Almeda graciously supplied music, for ut m the absence of our pianist. Helen Larson, who recently submitted tQ eye surgery. Thank ytMil Almedal Speedy Recovery Helen! Xrs. Daisy Dajilels. Supreme Director from Supreme Camp. Davenport, Iowa, will vish.our local camp 107S^ at the June 1st meeting. We beg each member to support your Camp by your attendance. There can be no harvest-unless seeds ate plantedl Lets make SPECIAL EFFORT sovhig seeds that.will mature and produce a Bountiful Harve8t-'.by our very presence and assistance. WE CAN REAP ONLY WHAT WE SOWl Mabel Newton and Cleo McQonald served delicious refreshments. Thelma Pullen won the Special Travel prize of a beautiful afghan. donated by Angie Hayward. Lets show our "ROYALITY" by being PRESENTPUNCTUAL and PERSISTENT, at each meeting, doing, our It is physically impossible for a scout to see every player in his territory play. The tryout camp is the perfect vehicle for a scout to see the unseen ballplayer. Many fine, unknown ballplayers have been signed out of tryout camps. For example, Dan Driessen, the Red's' first baseman, was discovered at a tryout camp. utmost. Expecting Record Attendance June 1st. See you.at 7:30. Anyone needing a ride-CALL A NEIGHBOR. Age limit will be from 15 to 22 and players must bring their own uniforms, shoes, and gloves. High school sophomores and juniors are most welcome to attend. Players on Legion clubs must have written permission from their coaches or Legion Commanders, and these notices mu st—he^ -prese*td upon arrival at the park. Contact Ralph Meder at 871-0726 if you have any questions. Start seedlings indoors m smtll pifitic-covtred con tainrt by sunny windows. I^g? fe* ce(Mii' Z3 Army Si Hrndrrwn (702) 565-9348 HMM 5*4-3197 rirl. l*t k Bruc 20,000 yards of in stock fabric at l/2?tlcc I U|Aolstwy*DrapffY } ^OistoM Owihtd ladspraods I m Naodbovfls ?
PAGE 12

• iVPii Page 12 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada tlranday, Nay 20, 1982 Municipal Court City Of Henderson Wednesday May 12, 1982 3:30 p.m. George, Frank Jefferson, 21, drive under influence, completed CCCC, Fined $125. revoked operators licehse, submitted. Fnd, Guilty. Fined $25. Isenhour, Wilton David, 29, drive under influence, did not complete schooling. Dined $175 and 25 days for contempt-court. Bail bond exon. Johnson, Don E. 45, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. Kellett. Kevin William, 22, contempt of court. PG-fined $100 Same posted Forefeited. Kopp, Steven Alan, 26, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. To pay $25 wkly beginning Fri. 5-14-82. Bail bond exon. Morabito, John John Lawrence, 25, drive under innuence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. To pay $50 this date & bal 5-28-82. Ordered. Paul, Marvin Frederick, 69, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. Reed, Robert Neil, 40. drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. Satlak, Deborah.Lynn, 27, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. Bail exonerated. Spring, §arah Wikel, 31, drive under influence, completed CCCC Fined $125. Stewart, Roy Lee, 29, drive under influCTce, completed CCCC. Fined $125 to pay by 4:30 pm Jim Smalley to be Honored The staff of Burkholder Junior High School, will honor Jim Smalley. former Nevada State Assemblyman, for his thirty-three years of service to the Clark County School District with a retirement party. „ ,^ A buffet will be held at the Gold Strike Inn. Highway 93^466 (on the way to Boulder Dam), on Fridav. May 21.^at 6:30. All of Smalleys many friends will meet to celebrate his retirement. Anvone who wishes to attend the buffet should contact Burkholder Junior High School. 564-2323, Fri. 5-28-82 so ordered. Thomas, Raymond Richard, 38, drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $25 weekly beginning Fri. 5-21-82 so ordered. Threet, Colleen (nmn), 28, Drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $10 weekly beginning 4:30 p.m. 5-14-82. Tippen, Charles Richard, 47, drive under influence. Completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $100 this date & bal by 4:30 p.m. Fri. 5-14-82. Turnbull, Charles Murrie, 23, drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $25 weekly with other continued fine. West, Davis Leon, 28, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. To pay by 4:30 p.m. Fri. 5-28-82. Wilcox. Daniel Duane, 25, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. Bail bond exonerated. Ordered. Wilk, Dennis, 28, drive under influence, completed CRKS. Fined $125. To pay $100 this date and balance 5-28-82. Wright, George Vernon, 66, drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $50 now and balance on Fri. 5-21-82. So ordered. 6:00 p.m. Asquith, Penny Jo, 18, expired registration, PGfined $25. posted, I'orf. failure to appear, PG-fined $100. Dominguez, Johnny Ray, 22, baatery, sent: fined $50. Bail bond exonerated, revoked drivers license, PG-fined $2.. Goodlantier, Ronald John, 21, disorderly conduct, PG-fined $25, Hamm, M'ichael Eugene, 19, disorderly conduct, PG-fined $25. Harris. Linford JoUey, 22, immodesty behavior, PG-fined $50. bail exonerated. ^ 7:00 p.m. Campbell, Chester Abarm, 28, driving under influence, dismissed per req CA. Madsen, Delbert M. 58, doing business wo license, trial held. Not guilty, no registration, trial held. Not guilty, no moving permit, trial held. Not guilty. Peters. Irwin Leroy, Jr., 41, disorderly conduct, dismissed per req. City atty. Thursday, May 131982 9:00 a.m. Trayis, Debbie Lorraine, 20, disobeyed stop sign, PG-fined $25. no drivers license, PG-fined $25. fictitious license plants, PG-fined $50. Brinkmann, Gregory Rand, 19, minor in possession, PG-fined $50. Bail exonerated, Trbovich, Doris M., 29, driving under influence, amended to full time & attn. per req. City Atty. PG-fined $50. PROM TIME The closing of school is near and that means prom night at all the high schools. Ruth Finch of Anne's Flowers in Green Valley Plaza is shown making a corsage for one prom night. The flower shop just recently opened in Green Valley and hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.. Satur-. day 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. LITTLE-KNOWN FACTS ABOUT DIETING ^ ^Xmericans today are cojv cerned about their weightso much so, that dieting' has become a national pastime. In one survey of 70,5 women, over 45 percent indicated that they w'ante^ to lose weight while 67 percent reperted that they could not oat whatever they wanted without gaining when meals are skipped and weight. the calorie intake is reControlling one's weight duced, there is a direct is one of the most difficult effect on the rate of weight health problems facing us loss. Research, however, intoday. According to the dicates that meal frequency National Center for Health may influence the body's Statistics. 29 percent of metabolism. It has been adult women with incomes suggested that when total above poverty level and 35 food intake is divided into percent of those with inonly one or two meals a comes below are considered day, the body accumulated obese. This means that they more fat than when smaller, weigh at least 20 percent more frequent meals with a in exces.s of their ideal similar number of calories body-weight. In contrast, 13 were eaten, percent of adult men with A key to a successful incomes above poverty level weight-reducing or maintenare considered obese^while ance program is a combinaonly r> percent of men tion of controlled caloric below poverty level are intake, the number of meals considered obese, eaten and exercise. A basic Is "skipping" breakfast breakfast which provides an important part of your one-fourth to one-third of dieting strategy"* If so you the total daily requiremenU may be surprised to learn for calories and essential that several researchers have nutrients helps maintain [ound that missing breakphysical and mental effifast often hinders, rather ciency in the late morning than helps, a weight-reduchours. These nutritional reing diet. In fact, they quirements can be met by a found that skipping breakbreakfast built around a fast may lead to overeatvariety of foods such as ing at meals later in the fruits and fruit juices, breads day and is associated with and cereals, milk and dairy a tendency toward obesity, foods, and meats, eggs and Another common misconoCher protein-rich foods. Eatception in dieting is that ing breakfast is important! AGENDA MONDAY. MAY 24. 1M2 7 00 P.M. ADJOl R.NED MEETING HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL „___ COUNCIL CHAMBER 843 WATER STREET I. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING II. CALL TO ORDER, ROLL CALL III. MOTION To reconsider the previous action of Uie Council relative to the Rnoning requested by Pardee Conslrurtion Co., From R-R to: IZS Acres R-2 and 3S Acres to R-3. located in Section 7, T22S, R2E. IV. (Z-20-81) • Zone Change from R-R to R-2 ad U-3 for proposed construction of homes in the 8-4 of the 8-W of Section 7, T22S. R62E. To be developed under a P,U.R.D. CLAHKTOMTIAC PATCLAHK PomtAC • MTCLjmpoMTiAC -#4r cuumpomukc PATCLAHKPOHTIAC • PAT cumc POMTIAC • PATCLAUK POHVAC 1982 PONTIAC T-1000 3 Door Hatchback FACTORY AIR CONDITIONINQ Automatic, tinted glass, tilt wheel, heavy duty battery, heavy duty radiator, detao AM radio, crome wheel trim rings, white side wall tires. 2756 — MO. PLUS TAX TotH CtpHMntlon MM7 LMM lof 46 pmnn ot I1J3.43 pkii IM, nt*t1 3271, rl month sdvUKa piyitwnl $200 MCurlty 4poll rafunditx* to cuMonwr. PHit sdvino* paynwnt el tUI.IO on ippfovd CfdH I FACTORY AIR CONDITIONING Power steering & brakes, automatic, tiumper guards front & rear, 60/40 notch bucket seats, painted accent stripes, heavy duty generator, custom color seat belts, tinted glass, lamp group, left sport mirror, right hand fixed mirror, deico AM radio system, dufll r. ige front & rear speakers, wire wheel covers with locking package, WSW steel belted tires, heavy duty battery. 2688 BUY KOURS NOW FOR ONLY 1982 PONTIAC J-2000 pHU ^ • • o 4 speed, 1.8 liter, 4 cylinder, custom air conditioning, heavy duty alternator, custom exterior group, power steering, DeIco AM Radio, steel belted radial, wsw tires, light blue finish. #2429 SALE PRICE 7955 1982 BONNEVILLE Factory air conditioning, automatic, heavy duty alternator, European bucket seats, power steering & brakes, power windows, DeIco AM/FM stereo, tilt. #2503 DISCOUNTED 1 PAT CLARKS BUY OF THE WEEK '80 CATALINA 4 DOOR 4 door, compltely factory equipped with air conditioning, rich gold. #4091 6i GnAND FHiX Absolutely loaded with beautiful tutone beige & gold. Buy of the Month, #4061 • 80 BOJ^VILLE Loaded, rich metallic gold, tremendous buy. #1670A. $ 5999 n% GRAND PRIX L.J. Loaded, rich red velour enterior, cold white, exceptional purchased. #4179 s 5999 SALE PRICE vji U u C. ^ FACTORY AIR CONDITIONINQ Automatic, power steering & brakes, low miles on all, ONLY $300 DOWN PAYMENT O.A.C.* $ 168 40* MO. PLUS TAX Ful4Sal*(>nct5M.t300(lopK)in30()*y.4a1M40.APR16 10% 'OnApprovad Cr()lt 82 J-2000 PRICED At LOW AS $ 300 DOWN PAYMENT* O.A.e. FACTORY AIR CONDITIONING Fully factory equipped, power steering & brakes, automatic, LOW MILES. 2 door coupe, 4397 'Full Sal* Prtc* $7158. $300 down, UIM Id lo bo pwO in 30 doyt, 48x208 44. APR 10 17S 'On Approvod CrodH SPECIALS OF THE WEEK *80BUICK SKYLARK 4 door Scdtn. corapltiely ftciory equipped with air, rich burguiidy in color. #16S9A *4999 '79 FORD COURIER PICKUP 4 >pd, air, cool whiit. 04t )4 Tremendous Buy *3999 '80DAnUNB2IO 2 door cpc,) speed, red. 04)55A "CraduaieDeli(;h(" SmanBuy *3499 '81 MONTE CARLO Completely loaded, like new, rich meialiic gold, Buy of ihc Week.4552B '6999 '80THUNDERBIRD Completely loaded, beautiful condition, rich burgundy. 2''90 *5299 '80 BONNEVILLE BR0U8HAMCPE ECONOMY DIESEL Absolutely loaded, gorgeous while on white, blue interior. n1049 A *s^ '80CHEV.M0NZACPE omatic, power steerii gold metallic. 0453 Automatic, power steering, air. 5jr, absolutely loaded with moon roof, gorgeous tutone. metallic brown ftjold, like new. 0BH5O6 f "l^f f '81 FORD FAIRMONT 4 door, automatic, power steering, factory air. family's answer toeconomy. Great Buy. 02559A *5999 '78 FORD COURIER PICKUP 4 speed, rich red, stereo, neat truck for neat price. 028O6A *2499 '80SUNBIRD Completely factory equipped, automatic, air conditioning, rich red. 04254 *4999 I*wc-t5r-'lt GM QUALITY S8MCE MRTS ODinua. MOTORS MUm DIVISIOM pontiac 287SE. SAHARA PHONE 457-2111 Sg HAlLE E8PAMOL ^ Thursday, May 20,1982 Henderson Home News, Hendierson, Nevada Page 13 Blue Jays Stay Atop Midget League With Fourth Straight Win Fred Lord's Blue Jays won their fourth straight game and remain undefeated after a come-from-behind 9-8 victory over Glenn Doering's Stauffer Cardinals in Midget League action Monday night at McDoniel Field. The win was the first under the lights, Dennis Belingheri led the offense during the first two innings with a single in the first that led to the Blue Jays' only first-inning run. He batted two runs in on a. double in the second. Pitcher Steve Lopez allowed no runs during the first three innings and tallied seven strikeouts while allowing only one hit and one walk. The Cards scored two runs in the top of the fourth with base hits by Steve Johnson, Mike Pence, Ray Friedrickson and Tony Frehner against Blue Jay's relief pitcher Shawn Preciado. First Baseman Jamie Schneck singled in the only run for the piue Jays in the fourth giving the Blue Jays a two run edge. The Cardinals exploded in the top of the fifth taking advantage oftwo walks with a single by Doug Doering, a two-run double by cleanup batter Steve Johnson and another single by Ray Friedrickson. The Blue Jays were not to be denied. Deedy Love led the action in the bottom of the fifth with a lead-off single and then, after a series of unearned bases and runs that put the Jays ahead by two. clinched the game by driving in the final run with his second hit of the inning. Steve Lopez returned to the mound in the top of the sixth and retired the side in order while adding two more strikeouts to the tally for a total of nine in the game. With the win the blue Jays remain in first place in the Midget League with a 4-0 record while the Cardinals, now 1-4, fall to eighth with the loss. In other Midget League action Monday the Mardian Construction Phillies got their first win of the season against the v^inless J&K II Bruins 11-8 on Vincent Field. Dan Jackman's Phillies are now 1-3 on the season while Ben Pipes' Bruins wait for their first win at 0-2-2. The H.P.C. Angels rallied for four runs in the top of the fifth and shutout the Henderson Astros in five out of six innings to take the 9-6 decision Monday night on Trimmer Field. Gary Conners' Astros took the early lead in the bottom of the second with siit runs in the inning but that's all that was heard from the Astros. Randy Shive's Angels kept plugging away, scoring two runs in both the first and third innings and one in the second before they sealed the game in the fifth. With the win the Angels move to third place with a 2-1-1 record but the Astros are right behind them despite the loss with a 3-2 mark. Wild Bill's Steak and. Tators Mets also stayed undefeated through Midget League play this week with their 17-9 win over Merrill's T.V. Royals Tuesday on Vincent Field. George Simone's Mets tied the game at six with a run in the second and cracked the egg wide open in the top of the third with 11 runs in the inning. The Mets are now in second place with a 3-0-1 mark while Bob Raeder's Royals are tied for fifth with a 1-2 record. Today's only Midget League baseball game features two teams with three wins, the Astros'and the Mets, on Vincent Field at 7:30 p.m. Friday the Cardinals host the Basic Ready Mix Bad News Bears on McDoniel Field and the Bruins entertain the Royals on Trimmer Field ^ith both games beginning at 7:^0 p.m. HENDERSON II NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENTER m U0MENEW5 THE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER SPORTS WORLD JdK Deli Keeps Perfect Record In Men's League J & K Deli picked up two [easy wins in Men's Slow [Pitch Softball League action last week and remain in first "^.ilplace with a 5-0 mark. "* Ron Armstrong's J & K Qeli team capitalized on a fix-run third inning in the team's first easy win of the week over the now 1-4 Todd's squad Thursday. Monday J & K had a little tougher time with the now' 2-3 Skyline. They kept the lead from the four-run second inning until the end of the game but had to hold off a Skyline four-run sixth inning rally to win 13-7. Three teams are hot on the trail of J & K Deli with 4-1 marks and each won two games last week to maintain their positions in a threeway tie for second. Work Clothes Rental had an unexpectedly easy time over John's Chevron last Wednesday, winning by the 10-run rule in the fifth 14-4. Work Clothes took a commanding lead with four in the first and five in the second and brought home three in the top of the fifth to gain the winning margin. The laundry boys had a much tougher time Monday night but pulled out a 14-13 squeeker by bringing one run across in the bottom of the eighth over the now 2-3 Goldmine crew. Centel stayed in the race by picking up two wins and improving to a 4-1 record. The telephone boys only allowed one run in two games last week as they downed the now 2-3 Skyline-Quickie team 11-1 Thursday and shut out 2-3 Perry's 15-0 Tuesday. Against Quickie Centel ended the game by the 10-run rule in the fifth by capping the game with six runs. They scored another five inning, 10-run rule victory by scoring in every inning while pitcher Bob Montoya baffied the stickless Perry's for the shutout. Womack also kept in the running with two victories to maintain a 4-1 second place tie record. Womack bested Sanders last Wednesday by breaking a 5-5 tie in the bottom of the fourth with five runs and held on for the 10-6 EDITOR'S NOTE: We looked through our back volumes and found this stirring account of the last time the Basic Wolves won a state baseball title. We thought you might enjoy it also. TUISOAr, MAY M, ItM HOME EDrnOH FIVE CINTS i^^am BASIC WOLVES DEFEAT RENO FOR SECOND BASiEBALL TITLE In a fantastic windup that bordered on the unbeUe^ra^ Coach John Tartan's BaSIc high baseball team successfully defended its state diamond championship Saturday defeating Rono 22-0 to take the third and deciding contest of the three game series. The teams had set the stage for the play-off game Friday as Basic tooic the opener, 6-1, but the Huskies from upstate had evened matters by taking the second tilt, 9-2. The initial game was played on the Henderson diamond, Friday night's game on the Boulder City high field under lights and the championship skirmish on the Henderson field. Coach Tartan, preferring not to single out individual players, coftimented that the final playoff game was the best team effort of the season. "Everyone was hitting and fielding Uke pros," he said, "and Ray Martinez looked sharp on the mound as he had his curve working t>etter than at any time during the season." "We ,outhustied them," he uid, which ^ somewhat Man understatement. He mi£)it have added that the Wolves outdobbered the Hus> Ues in the hit department Scorekeepers went completely beserk in the champtonship game as the Wolves tiin^d out 24 hits, or an average of abnost four an inning. While Coach Tartan didn't want to personally smgle out individual players, statistics show that Martinez covered himself with more than his share of tho glory by shackling Reno with three hits in that 6-1 opening victory and permitted the Huskies only seven blows in that 22-0 debacle when the tendency might have been to ease up with such a commanding lead to work on. Then too Ray banged out five hits in ten trips to the plate for a .500 series average. Percentage wise, the Wolves' hitter was Outfielder Sheridan Gilberis<^n who had four-for-five in the finale, the only game in whichi he appeared at the plate. Catcher Bob Peck and Second Sacker Donny Wilson collected the most hits for the winners, six each, Short Stop Dave Rothwell and First Baseman Doug Lottridge pounded out four each, Ranee White and Jerry Goyonedie three apiece. Center Fielder Joe Bills had two safeties and Right Fielder Mike Hahn one. Peck blasted the only homer of the series for the winners, connecting Friday night while the Wolves were going down to a 9-? defeat. In fact five of the diminutive catcher's she hits were good for extra base blows including three doubles and a triple to go with his four master. Fielding gem of the series from Basic's standpoint was Ranee White's tremendous catch in the second inning of the championship game when be Iwcked up far in left field to drag down a certain Reno hom& run. After that. Coach Tartan commented, his Wolves played Uke men possessed, and as it turned out they are men possessed. Possessed of their second straight baseball title. victory. They got their second win of the week on a 16-1 laugher over Sportsmen's Lounge Tuesday. John's Chevron rebounded from last Wednesday's loss to edge the now 1-4 ganders 9-7 Monday to take fifth place with a 3-2 record. John's Chevron used a seven runs in the first to take the lead and added two more in the fourth before Sanders rally fell short. In one of the most exciting games of the weekGoldmine scored a runner in the bottom of the ninth to edge Skyline 3-2 last Thursday. With Goldmine's win and Skyline's loss both teams' records are evened at 2-3 and both are tied for sixth place. Skyline sent the game into extra inning by adding one in the top of the seventh. In other outstanding action Skyline-Quickie's Mike Dougherty tossed for his first shutout this season over the 1-4 Todd's. Quickie scored in four out of five innings to take the five inning, 10-run rule win. Last Wednesday Perry's lost the battle for errors and won their second game of the season over the winless 0-5 Sportsmen's Lounge Club. Perry's held off a late inning rally that saw Sportsmen's come within one of victory 14-13. Highlighting this week's action are two John's Chevron's games against teams tied for second, Woma(fk Thursday and Centel Monday. Weekly Roundup Pepcon Edges Reduction, Tal(es Industrial Pepcon's 7-4 win over previously undefeated Reduction last Thursday highlighted the action last week on Titanium Field in the Industrial Slow Pitch Softball League. Pepcon, now 5-0 and in first place, got two three-run innings in the bottom of the first and the fifth to provide the winning margins. Reduction tied the game in the third after scoring two in the second and one in the third but they never caught Pepcon after Jim Cantrell's squad added one in the fourth. With that win and a 9-0 shutout over Melting Monday Pepcon stands as the only undefeated teant in the Industrial League. In Monday's^jcontest Pepcon used a four-run second along with two-run fifth and sixth innings to easily beat the punchless Melting team. Meanwhile, fourth place 3-1 Reduction remains poised to enter a three-way tie for second with the 4-1 State and Stauffer teams. Reduction is expected to rebound from last Thursday's loss to get their fourth win against the winless 0-4 Kerr M_cGee Wednesday. State Industries earned the second place tie with Stauffer by dealing Stauffer their first loss of the season Monday 11-6. State scored three runs in the first, third and fourth innings and held off a fifth and sixth inning rally by Stauffer to win. Both teams scored easy wins earlier in the weelt. State shut out the now 2-3 Levi Strauss team 12-0 in five innings last Wednesday and Stauffer used an eightrun sixth inning to end the game with Kerr McGee 16-3 Thursday. The Montrose Bombers picked up two wins last week to move into fifth place with a 3-2 record. Montrose held M elting to on ly two runs in the second whiTe^ they scored two runs in the first, third and fourth and capped the game with a three-run sixth inning to win 10-2 Friday. Tuesday Montrose and Technical swapped 13-run innings but Montrose added five-run second and fifth innings to outshell Technical 23-16. Three teams got their first wins of the season last week by beating each other. Melting rallied for three runs in the bottom of the sixth to slip past Gen Star 5-4 last Wednesday. Technical led from the first and capped the game with a four-run sixth inning to beat Gen Star 10-6. The Gen Star Stars ended the frustration Tuesday by pounding the now 2-3Levi Strauss team 19-4. Gen Star got the lead with six runs in the second and capped the game with a ninerun sixth inning. Alf of the teams that earned their first win last week are now 1-4 and tied for seventh place. Astros Hrst in Pee Wee Tee-Ball Scoreboard By virtue of their wins Monday night the Discount Britches Astros stay unbeaten and Sam's Town Gamblers and the^Pac-OutJibbers Jayhawks are deadlocked in a three-way tie for second. Coach Larry Clark's Astros took it to the winless 0-4 Yankees Monday on Vincent Field with a six-run third inning highlighting the 11-3^ win. Gambler Cliff Meier led the offensive and defensive charge against the winless Titans for the 11-6 victory on Trimmer Field. Meier pitched for five innings and held the Titans to three runs in a game that saw Gamblers' second-stringers see a lot of action according to coach Dave Meier. Cliff also led hitting with a double and a single and Brian Downer, Carl Ford, Bobby Elizondo and Jason Judd each slammed doubles. The Jayhawks also kept in the race for first with their 8-2 win over the State In_dustries. Coajch Mary Johnson's iBears scored their two only runs in the top of the third when Matthew Pence walked, David Biddinger cracked a RBI triple and Tim Fry brought him home on a single. Highlighting Friday's action in the Pee Wee League will be the 3-1 Montrose Chemical Angels meeting the 4-1 Jayhawlqs on Vincent Field at 7:30 p.m. Anyone interested in playing American Legion Basetnl should contact Gary Chaires. Tryouts are Monday for players ages 14 to 18 years old. Frank Price Boys Club Tee-Ball Scoreboard Biddy League Results Pirates 32, Red Sox 12 Phillies 21, Cubs 20 Cubs 26, Red Sox 10 Pirates 31, Twins 9 Red Sox 21, Twins 10 Pirates 22, Cubs 21 Phillies 24, Angels 9 Junior League Results Dodgers 20, Braves 10 Astros 17, Yanks 15 Astros 21, Giants 11 Yanks 12, Braves 8 Biddy League Standings TEAM WON LOST Pirates 10 Phillies .^.... 6 Cubs ..T;...!..i„. 6 0 3 4 7 7 9 Red Sox......... 4 Twins 3 Angels 0 Junior League Standings TEAM WON LOST Dodgers 8 0 Astros 4 4 Yanks .^.."....7.^....] 4 4 Giants ,...2 6:. 'Rra\M'~.zz~:z:.Trr::::~:2 v Tee-Bail Schedule Thursday, May 20, Phillies-Pirates, 4:30 p.m.; Cubs-Angels 5J0 p.m. Friday, May 21, Dodgers-Giants, 4:30 p.m.; Astros-Braves 5:30 p.m. Saturday, May 22, Cubs-Phillies, 9:30 a.m., Pirates-Twins 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 25, Angels-Red Sox, 4:30 p.m. Phillies-Twins 5:36 p.m.

PAGE 13

• iVPii Page 12 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada tlranday, Nay 20, 1982 Municipal Court City Of Henderson Wednesday May 12, 1982 3:30 p.m. George, Frank Jefferson, 21, drive under influence, completed CCCC, Fined $125. revoked operators licehse, submitted. Fnd, Guilty. Fined $25. Isenhour, Wilton David, 29, drive under influence, did not complete schooling. Dined $175 and 25 days for contempt-court. Bail bond exon. Johnson, Don E. 45, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. Kellett. Kevin William, 22, contempt of court. PG-fined $100 Same posted Forefeited. Kopp, Steven Alan, 26, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. To pay $25 wkly beginning Fri. 5-14-82. Bail bond exon. Morabito, John John Lawrence, 25, drive under innuence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. To pay $50 this date & bal 5-28-82. Ordered. Paul, Marvin Frederick, 69, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. Reed, Robert Neil, 40. drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. Satlak, Deborah.Lynn, 27, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. Bail exonerated. Spring, §arah Wikel, 31, drive under influence, completed CCCC Fined $125. Stewart, Roy Lee, 29, drive under influCTce, completed CCCC. Fined $125 to pay by 4:30 pm Jim Smalley to be Honored The staff of Burkholder Junior High School, will honor Jim Smalley. former Nevada State Assemblyman, for his thirty-three years of service to the Clark County School District with a retirement party. „ ,^ A buffet will be held at the Gold Strike Inn. Highway 93^466 (on the way to Boulder Dam), on Fridav. May 21.^at 6:30. All of Smalleys many friends will meet to celebrate his retirement. Anvone who wishes to attend the buffet should contact Burkholder Junior High School. 564-2323, Fri. 5-28-82 so ordered. Thomas, Raymond Richard, 38, drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $25 weekly beginning Fri. 5-21-82 so ordered. Threet, Colleen (nmn), 28, Drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $10 weekly beginning 4:30 p.m. 5-14-82. Tippen, Charles Richard, 47, drive under influence. Completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $100 this date & bal by 4:30 p.m. Fri. 5-14-82. Turnbull, Charles Murrie, 23, drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $25 weekly with other continued fine. West, Davis Leon, 28, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. To pay by 4:30 p.m. Fri. 5-28-82. Wilcox. Daniel Duane, 25, drive under influence, completed CCCC. Fined $125. Bail bond exonerated. Ordered. Wilk, Dennis, 28, drive under influence, completed CRKS. Fined $125. To pay $100 this date and balance 5-28-82. Wright, George Vernon, 66, drive under influence, completed CRS. Fined $125. To pay $50 now and balance on Fri. 5-21-82. So ordered. 6:00 p.m. Asquith, Penny Jo, 18, expired registration, PGfined $25. posted, I'orf. failure to appear, PG-fined $100. Dominguez, Johnny Ray, 22, baatery, sent: fined $50. Bail bond exonerated, revoked drivers license, PG-fined $2.. Goodlantier, Ronald John, 21, disorderly conduct, PG-fined $25, Hamm, M'ichael Eugene, 19, disorderly conduct, PG-fined $25. Harris. Linford JoUey, 22, immodesty behavior, PG-fined $50. bail exonerated. ^ 7:00 p.m. Campbell, Chester Abarm, 28, driving under influence, dismissed per req CA. Madsen, Delbert M. 58, doing business wo license, trial held. Not guilty, no registration, trial held. Not guilty, no moving permit, trial held. Not guilty. Peters. Irwin Leroy, Jr., 41, disorderly conduct, dismissed per req. City atty. Thursday, May 131982 9:00 a.m. Trayis, Debbie Lorraine, 20, disobeyed stop sign, PG-fined $25. no drivers license, PG-fined $25. fictitious license plants, PG-fined $50. Brinkmann, Gregory Rand, 19, minor in possession, PG-fined $50. Bail exonerated, Trbovich, Doris M., 29, driving under influence, amended to full time & attn. per req. City Atty. PG-fined $50. PROM TIME The closing of school is near and that means prom night at all the high schools. Ruth Finch of Anne's Flowers in Green Valley Plaza is shown making a corsage for one prom night. The flower shop just recently opened in Green Valley and hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.. Satur-. day 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. LITTLE-KNOWN FACTS ABOUT DIETING ^ ^Xmericans today are cojv cerned about their weightso much so, that dieting' has become a national pastime. In one survey of 70,5 women, over 45 percent indicated that they w'ante^ to lose weight while 67 percent reperted that they could not oat whatever they wanted without gaining when meals are skipped and weight. the calorie intake is reControlling one's weight duced, there is a direct is one of the most difficult effect on the rate of weight health problems facing us loss. Research, however, intoday. According to the dicates that meal frequency National Center for Health may influence the body's Statistics. 29 percent of metabolism. It has been adult women with incomes suggested that when total above poverty level and 35 food intake is divided into percent of those with inonly one or two meals a comes below are considered day, the body accumulated obese. This means that they more fat than when smaller, weigh at least 20 percent more frequent meals with a in exces.s of their ideal similar number of calories body-weight. In contrast, 13 were eaten, percent of adult men with A key to a successful incomes above poverty level weight-reducing or maintenare considered obese^while ance program is a combinaonly r> percent of men tion of controlled caloric below poverty level are intake, the number of meals considered obese, eaten and exercise. A basic Is "skipping" breakfast breakfast which provides an important part of your one-fourth to one-third of dieting strategy"* If so you the total daily requiremenU may be surprised to learn for calories and essential that several researchers have nutrients helps maintain [ound that missing breakphysical and mental effifast often hinders, rather ciency in the late morning than helps, a weight-reduchours. These nutritional reing diet. In fact, they quirements can be met by a found that skipping breakbreakfast built around a fast may lead to overeatvariety of foods such as ing at meals later in the fruits and fruit juices, breads day and is associated with and cereals, milk and dairy a tendency toward obesity, foods, and meats, eggs and Another common misconoCher protein-rich foods. Eatception in dieting is that ing breakfast is important! AGENDA MONDAY. MAY 24. 1M2 7 00 P.M. ADJOl R.NED MEETING HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL „___ COUNCIL CHAMBER 843 WATER STREET I. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING II. CALL TO ORDER, ROLL CALL III. MOTION To reconsider the previous action of Uie Council relative to the Rnoning requested by Pardee Conslrurtion Co., From R-R to: IZS Acres R-2 and 3S Acres to R-3. located in Section 7, T22S, R2E. IV. (Z-20-81) • Zone Change from R-R to R-2 ad U-3 for proposed construction of homes in the 8-4 of the 8-W of Section 7, T22S. R62E. To be developed under a P,U.R.D. CLAHKTOMTIAC PATCLAHK PomtAC • MTCLjmpoMTiAC -#4r cuumpomukc PATCLAHKPOHTIAC • PAT cumc POMTIAC • PATCLAUK POHVAC 1982 PONTIAC T-1000 3 Door Hatchback FACTORY AIR CONDITIONINQ Automatic, tinted glass, tilt wheel, heavy duty battery, heavy duty radiator, detao AM radio, crome wheel trim rings, white side wall tires. 2756 — MO. PLUS TAX TotH CtpHMntlon MM7 LMM lof 46 pmnn ot I1J3.43 pkii IM, nt*t1 3271, rl month sdvUKa piyitwnl $200 MCurlty 4poll rafunditx* to cuMonwr. PHit sdvino* paynwnt el tUI.IO on ippfovd CfdH I FACTORY AIR CONDITIONING Power steering & brakes, automatic, tiumper guards front & rear, 60/40 notch bucket seats, painted accent stripes, heavy duty generator, custom color seat belts, tinted glass, lamp group, left sport mirror, right hand fixed mirror, deico AM radio system, dufll r. ige front & rear speakers, wire wheel covers with locking package, WSW steel belted tires, heavy duty battery. 2688 BUY KOURS NOW FOR ONLY 1982 PONTIAC J-2000 pHU ^ • • o 4 speed, 1.8 liter, 4 cylinder, custom air conditioning, heavy duty alternator, custom exterior group, power steering, DeIco AM Radio, steel belted radial, wsw tires, light blue finish. #2429 SALE PRICE 7955 1982 BONNEVILLE Factory air conditioning, automatic, heavy duty alternator, European bucket seats, power steering & brakes, power windows, DeIco AM/FM stereo, tilt. #2503 DISCOUNTED 1 PAT CLARKS BUY OF THE WEEK '80 CATALINA 4 DOOR 4 door, compltely factory equipped with air conditioning, rich gold. #4091 6i GnAND FHiX Absolutely loaded with beautiful tutone beige & gold. Buy of the Month, #4061 • 80 BOJ^VILLE Loaded, rich metallic gold, tremendous buy. #1670A. $ 5999 n% GRAND PRIX L.J. Loaded, rich red velour enterior, cold white, exceptional purchased. #4179 s 5999 SALE PRICE vji U u C. ^ FACTORY AIR CONDITIONINQ Automatic, power steering & brakes, low miles on all, ONLY $300 DOWN PAYMENT O.A.C.* $ 168 40* MO. PLUS TAX Ful4Sal*(>nct5M.t300(lopK)in30()*y.4a1M40.APR16 10% 'OnApprovad Cr()lt 82 J-2000 PRICED At LOW AS $ 300 DOWN PAYMENT* O.A.e. FACTORY AIR CONDITIONING Fully factory equipped, power steering & brakes, automatic, LOW MILES. 2 door coupe, 4397 'Full Sal* Prtc* $7158. $300 down, UIM Id lo bo pwO in 30 doyt, 48x208 44. APR 10 17S 'On Approvod CrodH SPECIALS OF THE WEEK *80BUICK SKYLARK 4 door Scdtn. corapltiely ftciory equipped with air, rich burguiidy in color. #16S9A *4999 '79 FORD COURIER PICKUP 4 >pd, air, cool whiit. 04t )4 Tremendous Buy *3999 '80DAnUNB2IO 2 door cpc,) speed, red. 04)55A "CraduaieDeli(;h(" SmanBuy *3499 '81 MONTE CARLO Completely loaded, like new, rich meialiic gold, Buy of ihc Week.4552B '6999 '80THUNDERBIRD Completely loaded, beautiful condition, rich burgundy. 2''90 *5299 '80 BONNEVILLE BR0U8HAMCPE ECONOMY DIESEL Absolutely loaded, gorgeous while on white, blue interior. n1049 A *s^ '80CHEV.M0NZACPE omatic, power steerii gold metallic. 0453 Automatic, power steering, air. 5jr, absolutely loaded with moon roof, gorgeous tutone. metallic brown ftjold, like new. 0BH5O6 f "l^f f '81 FORD FAIRMONT 4 door, automatic, power steering, factory air. family's answer toeconomy. Great Buy. 02559A *5999 '78 FORD COURIER PICKUP 4 speed, rich red, stereo, neat truck for neat price. 028O6A *2499 '80SUNBIRD Completely factory equipped, automatic, air conditioning, rich red. 04254 *4999 I*wc-t5r-'lt GM QUALITY S8MCE MRTS ODinua. MOTORS MUm DIVISIOM pontiac 287SE. SAHARA PHONE 457-2111 Sg HAlLE E8PAMOL ^ Thursday, May 20,1982 Henderson Home News, Hendierson, Nevada Page 13 Blue Jays Stay Atop Midget League With Fourth Straight Win Fred Lord's Blue Jays won their fourth straight game and remain undefeated after a come-from-behind 9-8 victory over Glenn Doering's Stauffer Cardinals in Midget League action Monday night at McDoniel Field. The win was the first under the lights, Dennis Belingheri led the offense during the first two innings with a single in the first that led to the Blue Jays' only first-inning run. He batted two runs in on a. double in the second. Pitcher Steve Lopez allowed no runs during the first three innings and tallied seven strikeouts while allowing only one hit and one walk. The Cards scored two runs in the top of the fourth with base hits by Steve Johnson, Mike Pence, Ray Friedrickson and Tony Frehner against Blue Jay's relief pitcher Shawn Preciado. First Baseman Jamie Schneck singled in the only run for the piue Jays in the fourth giving the Blue Jays a two run edge. The Cardinals exploded in the top of the fifth taking advantage oftwo walks with a single by Doug Doering, a two-run double by cleanup batter Steve Johnson and another single by Ray Friedrickson. The Blue Jays were not to be denied. Deedy Love led the action in the bottom of the fifth with a lead-off single and then, after a series of unearned bases and runs that put the Jays ahead by two. clinched the game by driving in the final run with his second hit of the inning. Steve Lopez returned to the mound in the top of the sixth and retired the side in order while adding two more strikeouts to the tally for a total of nine in the game. With the win the blue Jays remain in first place in the Midget League with a 4-0 record while the Cardinals, now 1-4, fall to eighth with the loss. In other Midget League action Monday the Mardian Construction Phillies got their first win of the season against the v^inless J&K II Bruins 11-8 on Vincent Field. Dan Jackman's Phillies are now 1-3 on the season while Ben Pipes' Bruins wait for their first win at 0-2-2. The H.P.C. Angels rallied for four runs in the top of the fifth and shutout the Henderson Astros in five out of six innings to take the 9-6 decision Monday night on Trimmer Field. Gary Conners' Astros took the early lead in the bottom of the second with siit runs in the inning but that's all that was heard from the Astros. Randy Shive's Angels kept plugging away, scoring two runs in both the first and third innings and one in the second before they sealed the game in the fifth. With the win the Angels move to third place with a 2-1-1 record but the Astros are right behind them despite the loss with a 3-2 mark. Wild Bill's Steak and. Tators Mets also stayed undefeated through Midget League play this week with their 17-9 win over Merrill's T.V. Royals Tuesday on Vincent Field. George Simone's Mets tied the game at six with a run in the second and cracked the egg wide open in the top of the third with 11 runs in the inning. The Mets are now in second place with a 3-0-1 mark while Bob Raeder's Royals are tied for fifth with a 1-2 record. Today's only Midget League baseball game features two teams with three wins, the Astros'and the Mets, on Vincent Field at 7:30 p.m. Friday the Cardinals host the Basic Ready Mix Bad News Bears on McDoniel Field and the Bruins entertain the Royals on Trimmer Field ^ith both games beginning at 7:^0 p.m. HENDERSON II NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENTER m U0MENEW5 THE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER SPORTS WORLD JdK Deli Keeps Perfect Record In Men's League J & K Deli picked up two [easy wins in Men's Slow [Pitch Softball League action last week and remain in first "^.ilplace with a 5-0 mark. "* Ron Armstrong's J & K Qeli team capitalized on a fix-run third inning in the team's first easy win of the week over the now 1-4 Todd's squad Thursday. Monday J & K had a little tougher time with the now' 2-3 Skyline. They kept the lead from the four-run second inning until the end of the game but had to hold off a Skyline four-run sixth inning rally to win 13-7. Three teams are hot on the trail of J & K Deli with 4-1 marks and each won two games last week to maintain their positions in a threeway tie for second. Work Clothes Rental had an unexpectedly easy time over John's Chevron last Wednesday, winning by the 10-run rule in the fifth 14-4. Work Clothes took a commanding lead with four in the first and five in the second and brought home three in the top of the fifth to gain the winning margin. The laundry boys had a much tougher time Monday night but pulled out a 14-13 squeeker by bringing one run across in the bottom of the eighth over the now 2-3 Goldmine crew. Centel stayed in the race by picking up two wins and improving to a 4-1 record. The telephone boys only allowed one run in two games last week as they downed the now 2-3 Skyline-Quickie team 11-1 Thursday and shut out 2-3 Perry's 15-0 Tuesday. Against Quickie Centel ended the game by the 10-run rule in the fifth by capping the game with six runs. They scored another five inning, 10-run rule victory by scoring in every inning while pitcher Bob Montoya baffied the stickless Perry's for the shutout. Womack also kept in the running with two victories to maintain a 4-1 second place tie record. Womack bested Sanders last Wednesday by breaking a 5-5 tie in the bottom of the fourth with five runs and held on for the 10-6 EDITOR'S NOTE: We looked through our back volumes and found this stirring account of the last time the Basic Wolves won a state baseball title. We thought you might enjoy it also. TUISOAr, MAY M, ItM HOME EDrnOH FIVE CINTS i^^am BASIC WOLVES DEFEAT RENO FOR SECOND BASiEBALL TITLE In a fantastic windup that bordered on the unbeUe^ra^ Coach John Tartan's BaSIc high baseball team successfully defended its state diamond championship Saturday defeating Rono 22-0 to take the third and deciding contest of the three game series. The teams had set the stage for the play-off game Friday as Basic tooic the opener, 6-1, but the Huskies from upstate had evened matters by taking the second tilt, 9-2. The initial game was played on the Henderson diamond, Friday night's game on the Boulder City high field under lights and the championship skirmish on the Henderson field. Coach Tartan, preferring not to single out individual players, coftimented that the final playoff game was the best team effort of the season. "Everyone was hitting and fielding Uke pros," he said, "and Ray Martinez looked sharp on the mound as he had his curve working t>etter than at any time during the season." "We ,outhustied them," he uid, which ^ somewhat Man understatement. He mi£)it have added that the Wolves outdobbered the Hus> Ues in the hit department Scorekeepers went completely beserk in the champtonship game as the Wolves tiin^d out 24 hits, or an average of abnost four an inning. While Coach Tartan didn't want to personally smgle out individual players, statistics show that Martinez covered himself with more than his share of tho glory by shackling Reno with three hits in that 6-1 opening victory and permitted the Huskies only seven blows in that 22-0 debacle when the tendency might have been to ease up with such a commanding lead to work on. Then too Ray banged out five hits in ten trips to the plate for a .500 series average. Percentage wise, the Wolves' hitter was Outfielder Sheridan Gilberis<^n who had four-for-five in the finale, the only game in whichi he appeared at the plate. Catcher Bob Peck and Second Sacker Donny Wilson collected the most hits for the winners, six each, Short Stop Dave Rothwell and First Baseman Doug Lottridge pounded out four each, Ranee White and Jerry Goyonedie three apiece. Center Fielder Joe Bills had two safeties and Right Fielder Mike Hahn one. Peck blasted the only homer of the series for the winners, connecting Friday night while the Wolves were going down to a 9-? defeat. In fact five of the diminutive catcher's she hits were good for extra base blows including three doubles and a triple to go with his four master. Fielding gem of the series from Basic's standpoint was Ranee White's tremendous catch in the second inning of the championship game when be Iwcked up far in left field to drag down a certain Reno hom& run. After that. Coach Tartan commented, his Wolves played Uke men possessed, and as it turned out they are men possessed. Possessed of their second straight baseball title. victory. They got their second win of the week on a 16-1 laugher over Sportsmen's Lounge Tuesday. John's Chevron rebounded from last Wednesday's loss to edge the now 1-4 ganders 9-7 Monday to take fifth place with a 3-2 record. John's Chevron used a seven runs in the first to take the lead and added two more in the fourth before Sanders rally fell short. In one of the most exciting games of the weekGoldmine scored a runner in the bottom of the ninth to edge Skyline 3-2 last Thursday. With Goldmine's win and Skyline's loss both teams' records are evened at 2-3 and both are tied for sixth place. Skyline sent the game into extra inning by adding one in the top of the seventh. In other outstanding action Skyline-Quickie's Mike Dougherty tossed for his first shutout this season over the 1-4 Todd's. Quickie scored in four out of five innings to take the five inning, 10-run rule win. Last Wednesday Perry's lost the battle for errors and won their second game of the season over the winless 0-5 Sportsmen's Lounge Club. Perry's held off a late inning rally that saw Sportsmen's come within one of victory 14-13. Highlighting this week's action are two John's Chevron's games against teams tied for second, Woma(fk Thursday and Centel Monday. Weekly Roundup Pepcon Edges Reduction, Tal(es Industrial Pepcon's 7-4 win over previously undefeated Reduction last Thursday highlighted the action last week on Titanium Field in the Industrial Slow Pitch Softball League. Pepcon, now 5-0 and in first place, got two three-run innings in the bottom of the first and the fifth to provide the winning margins. Reduction tied the game in the third after scoring two in the second and one in the third but they never caught Pepcon after Jim Cantrell's squad added one in the fourth. With that win and a 9-0 shutout over Melting Monday Pepcon stands as the only undefeated teant in the Industrial League. In Monday's^jcontest Pepcon used a four-run second along with two-run fifth and sixth innings to easily beat the punchless Melting team. Meanwhile, fourth place 3-1 Reduction remains poised to enter a three-way tie for second with the 4-1 State and Stauffer teams. Reduction is expected to rebound from last Thursday's loss to get their fourth win against the winless 0-4 Kerr M_cGee Wednesday. State Industries earned the second place tie with Stauffer by dealing Stauffer their first loss of the season Monday 11-6. State scored three runs in the first, third and fourth innings and held off a fifth and sixth inning rally by Stauffer to win. Both teams scored easy wins earlier in the weelt. State shut out the now 2-3 Levi Strauss team 12-0 in five innings last Wednesday and Stauffer used an eightrun sixth inning to end the game with Kerr McGee 16-3 Thursday. The Montrose Bombers picked up two wins last week to move into fifth place with a 3-2 record. Montrose held M elting to on ly two runs in the second whiTe^ they scored two runs in the first, third and fourth and capped the game with a three-run sixth inning to win 10-2 Friday. Tuesday Montrose and Technical swapped 13-run innings but Montrose added five-run second and fifth innings to outshell Technical 23-16. Three teams got their first wins of the season last week by beating each other. Melting rallied for three runs in the bottom of the sixth to slip past Gen Star 5-4 last Wednesday. Technical led from the first and capped the game with a four-run sixth inning to beat Gen Star 10-6. The Gen Star Stars ended the frustration Tuesday by pounding the now 2-3Levi Strauss team 19-4. Gen Star got the lead with six runs in the second and capped the game with a ninerun sixth inning. Alf of the teams that earned their first win last week are now 1-4 and tied for seventh place. Astros Hrst in Pee Wee Tee-Ball Scoreboard By virtue of their wins Monday night the Discount Britches Astros stay unbeaten and Sam's Town Gamblers and the^Pac-OutJibbers Jayhawks are deadlocked in a three-way tie for second. Coach Larry Clark's Astros took it to the winless 0-4 Yankees Monday on Vincent Field with a six-run third inning highlighting the 11-3^ win. Gambler Cliff Meier led the offensive and defensive charge against the winless Titans for the 11-6 victory on Trimmer Field. Meier pitched for five innings and held the Titans to three runs in a game that saw Gamblers' second-stringers see a lot of action according to coach Dave Meier. Cliff also led hitting with a double and a single and Brian Downer, Carl Ford, Bobby Elizondo and Jason Judd each slammed doubles. The Jayhawks also kept in the race for first with their 8-2 win over the State In_dustries. Coajch Mary Johnson's iBears scored their two only runs in the top of the third when Matthew Pence walked, David Biddinger cracked a RBI triple and Tim Fry brought him home on a single. Highlighting Friday's action in the Pee Wee League will be the 3-1 Montrose Chemical Angels meeting the 4-1 Jayhawlqs on Vincent Field at 7:30 p.m. Anyone interested in playing American Legion Basetnl should contact Gary Chaires. Tryouts are Monday for players ages 14 to 18 years old. Frank Price Boys Club Tee-Ball Scoreboard Biddy League Results Pirates 32, Red Sox 12 Phillies 21, Cubs 20 Cubs 26, Red Sox 10 Pirates 31, Twins 9 Red Sox 21, Twins 10 Pirates 22, Cubs 21 Phillies 24, Angels 9 Junior League Results Dodgers 20, Braves 10 Astros 17, Yanks 15 Astros 21, Giants 11 Yanks 12, Braves 8 Biddy League Standings TEAM WON LOST Pirates 10 Phillies .^.... 6 Cubs ..T;...!..i„. 6 0 3 4 7 7 9 Red Sox......... 4 Twins 3 Angels 0 Junior League Standings TEAM WON LOST Dodgers 8 0 Astros 4 4 Yanks .^.."....7.^....] 4 4 Giants ,...2 6:. 'Rra\M'~.zz~:z:.Trr::::~:2 v Tee-Bail Schedule Thursday, May 20, Phillies-Pirates, 4:30 p.m.; Cubs-Angels 5J0 p.m. Friday, May 21, Dodgers-Giants, 4:30 p.m.; Astros-Braves 5:30 p.m. Saturday, May 22, Cubs-Phillies, 9:30 a.m., Pirates-Twins 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 25, Angels-Red Sox, 4:30 p.m. Phillies-Twins 5:36 p.m.

PAGE 14

' • ? -5 .!5 T • ? T^T^ • N Page 14 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, May ZO, iwi Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 15 Guidelines By Al Cieri This column is going to be difficult to complete. Not that there is a lack of material to tell you but rather my arms are tired from catching fish! It seems a shame to waste energy pushing a pen when a person could easily attache his or her arm to a rod and reel and simply partake in some great fishing! Stripers first. Last week was good when they were hitting anchovies and subsurface lures but this week was, and will continue to be, what all anglers hope for. Its top water action at its finest with almost everyone enjoying the ultimate thrill of stripers smashing surface lures. Everyone fishing the upper Virgin Basin that is. The lower Boulder Basin has fish but has been slow to -::r€spond to top water lures and to anything else for that matter. In the past week fellow guide. John Harman. took David Decow and son. Paul Deluca and son. and the Rich Lee family of Los Angeles to the Virgin Basin and they all limited out on surface lures. Most of these people had not even seen a striper before much less caught one. So. with a little effort and patience the fish are available to everyone. Jim Goff and Bill Spellman, both fellow guides, also took advantage erf this great springtime surface action. Where? Well if you can find Walker Wash and have a boat then your search need go any further. Once you find it (it will be the area with at least two dozen boats so it should be easy to spot) then go to work with your lures. The best results have been with redfins and zara spooks. The best size in the redfins have been the 900 series and virtually any color will work. If you cannot connect with this lure then slow your retrieve speed and come to a stop if you have to. Use either a ^4 or T'i ounce zara spook and work it as per the instructions on the box. Color does not seem to be important with this lure either. Make good casts and presentations and you willccatch fish. If lures do not work foryou then switch to anchovies and hang on. If none of the above work, then remember that on May 22nd Nevada Striper will hold a casting clinic and graph demonstration at Calville Bay at 1 p.m. Also on May 22nd, Nevada Striper and Sunset Marine and Tackle will have a ^a^ Edward Bennett Williams, Baltimore Orioles owner, referring to the National League's notoriously conservative owners; "They're 100 percent for progress and 100 jjercent against change." f^ George Brett of the Kansas City Royals is going to try and be a big hit in the cinema now, as hell debut in "The Moving Picture Cowboy," a Tom Mix remake. George's only other acting experience to date was the Preparation H commercials he did after the 1980 World Series. seminar which will be held at Cannon Jr. High School beginning at 7 p.m. If you want to learn how to cast, use a graph, find and catch fish, then May 22nd is the day you can set aside for your whole family and "get after it." For further information call John Harman at 565-1459; Ben's Tackle 456-7171 or Ron's Tackle 361-5564. You can also call me. I'll be at Walker Wash throwing redfins or on Mohave whipping out "fat gitzits." Now for largemouth bass fans ... the outlook is good and the future looks terrific. First a name out of the past, Gary Wright, remember him? Well he finally patched the holes I put in his boat and is back to lowering the fish population. Gary spent two days with four friends from Hawaii at Grand Wash and Iceberg Canyon. They caught at least a hundred fish and a good share of them with zara spooks. Granted, Gary is no ordinary angler, maybe one of the areas finest but the point is. he consistently catches fish. What is his secret? Number one. he works very hard and concentrates on his fishing and he uses soft plastic baits and surface lures just like the rest of us, with considerably better results. Last weekend the Southern Nevada Bassmasters held a tournament with Ronnie Beard taking first place, Ray Thurston second, Steve Syvanie third and Don Solberg fourth. Now these "Bassmasters are also several cuts above the average angler but they use the same lures that the rest of us common anglers use. Mainly soft plastic baits and I am talking about things like-fat gitzits, spider jigs. boogie tails, and plastic worms. These lures are not new and they are very easy to use. Go to any of the tackle shops and ask about them. If they can't explain to you how to use these lures, then change tackle shops! Anyway, to press further on with this largemouth portion, Ron Kennedy and Clark Hamilton spent a day on Lake Mohave throwing fat gitzits and, yes, they caught at least twenty nice size bass. Even more important is that everyone is seeing nice bass and they seem to all be in good shape. Mike GolubiG brought in several three pounders using plastic baits, And. in a tournament on Saturday on Lake Mohave the winner used, you guessed it, soft plastic baits! Next week we hope to visit with Dave Jenny from Nellis Air Base and the rest of his angling friends out there who are maybe the hottest fishermen in the area. Gary needs some competition! Seniors Golf Annual Championship Tournament Sunday Parings May 23 Las Vegas Golf Club :J0 E. BowM • P Willir Jay RuiMII Bob Taylor. 8:37 J Wood! • D Hlchardaoo B. Graf W K. MartlB. 8:44 Hollli Harrii C. SumpUr L. Man|Un> Ray Mttki. 8:S1 M. J. Pike • R. MadlaoD B. Beaver • F. Bulteri. 8:U C. Mauccrl T. Stirling W. HarrlioD J. ArnoldicB. 05 R. Regent J. Pocock R. Chlaholm • D. Vitro. :12 J Kelly B. Turpen P. Narclnok • J. Dragovlch. •; It L. T Huff J. Herron R. Pugh • J. Dwyer. $:U W. Hobart J. Wlllia • D. Olaon E. Davit. t:33 P. Umpel J. McCarthy • R. Eada J. Elagrtn. f:40 H< Hackett H. Showers K. Weit • R. Meade. t:47 H. IVrcell Z. NaU • J. Jakobc • W. Price. > 9:M G. Bloom • F. Welhauten E. Addington • A. Hansen. 10:01 H. Moore • L. Sammann W. Southall C. Brown. 10^08 R. Birchum • P. Pond R. Dean A. Baer. 10:1S J. LePlre. Sr. W. Spaniel • R. Dotti S. Povec. lO-.tt J. Swaggerty B. Youngi • C. Chapnun P. Gonxalei. 10:n J. Steinberg H. Hcndrlx H. Gray V Holmei. 10:3 W. Bayer E. Haupt • D. Ingbram F. Garvey. Black Mountain C. C. 9:U B. Warner • S. Gordon • W. J. Barnes • John Wright. 9:33 U J. Heenan • M. J. Wendell J. Canniff Al DcFalco. :40 J. Fielding G. Brammer Joe Zacb • Nell Emigh. 9:47 W. Moskaluk S. Simmons J. Paul C. Cobb. 9:M A. J. Morasse • Herb Harris • W. Kaercher J. Thompson. 10:01 L. Maynard • J. Brugman • Stan Elliott • R. H. Thompson. 10:08 R. G. Sparks Bill Gearin • S. Palernostro • F. Cardno. 10:1S Glen Muchow J. Broderick C. W. Martin • K. Schwarx. 10:22 J. Doll D. TiltOB • G. Innocenii • A. Pierottl. 10:29 O. W. Clark F. PorterJ. Reible S. Rodda. 10:36 R. Luongo • S. Daniels • T. Campese R. Long. Ramsey (84) for a rebound in Tuesday.'s NFL Battle of Champions. Smerek's Cowboys lost, the consolation game of the tournament, 85-64. 10:43 J MIndcll • J Stcelman R. Marquis. J. Bob Graham. |0:S0 F Symons C Drew J. Scbell A. Paternostro. 10:37 G. Jock Wilson Harry Miller • F. August F. Kology 11:04 H. Cbrlstensen D. Batingcr W. Schranti • C. Page. 11:11 R. Peterson • otto LaCrow P. McEnroe • H. Knoi. 1I:18E TKoskiIan SmithD. BirdsoDg • K. Duncan. 11:2S Bud Bradley • Wm. Barnett W. Heimlick • V. Harlan. 11:32 A. Zink R. Roles D. Brown • L. Pederson. Las Vegas Golf Club 8:30 Bob Wamer • S. Gordon W. J. Barnes • John Wright. 8:37 L. J. Hccnan • M. J. Wendell • J. CannUr • Al DcFalco. 8:44 John Fielding G. Brammer-Joe Zach • NIel Emigh. 8:11 W. Motkaluk 8. Simmons J. Paul • C. Cobb. 8:S8 A. J. Morasse • Herb Harris W. Kaercher J. Thompson. 9:05 Lee Maynard • J. Brugman Stan Elliott R. H. Thompson. 9:12 R. G. Sparks • Bill Gearin Sam Paternostro • F. Cardno. 9:19 Glen Muchow J. Broderick • C. W. Mariin K. Schwan. 9;M J. Doll D. Tllton G. Innocenii A. Pierottl. 9:33 O.W. Clark F. Porter -J. Reible • S. Rodda. 9:40 Rome Luongo • S. Daniels T. Canpese R. Long. 9:47 J. MIndcll • J Sleelman • R. Marquis Jim Bob Graham. 9:34 F. Symons • C. Drew N Scholl • A. Paternostro. 10:01 G. Jock Wilson Harry Miller • F. August F. Kology. 10:08 H. Cbrlstensen • D. Baslnger • W. Schranti • F. Gradyan. 10:13 R. Peterson • Otto LaGrou P. McEnroe • H. Knox. 10:22 E. T. Koski Ian Smith • D. Birdsong K. Duncan. 10:29 Bud Bradley Wm Barnett W. Heimlick • V. HarIan. 10:3< A. Zink • R. Roles • D. Brown • L Pederson. Saturday Pairings May 22 Black Mountain C. C. 9:28 E. Bowes • P. Walker Jay Russell Bob Taylor. 9:33 J. Woods • D. Richardson B. Graf W. K. Martin. 9:40 Hollls Harris C. Sumpter L. Mankins Ray Mecki. 9:47 M. J. Pike R. Madison • B. Beaver F. Butters. 9:M C. Mauceri T. Stirling • W. Harrison • J. Arnoldsen. 10:01 R. Regent J. Pocock • R. Chisholm ^ Vitro. 10:08 J. Kelly B. Turpen P. Marcinek J. Dragovlch. 10:1$L. T. Huff-J. HerroaR. Pugh J. Dwyer. 10:22 W.HobariJ. Willis D. Olson E. Davis. 10:29 P. Umpel J. McCarthy R. Eads • J. Elmgren. 10:38 H. Hackett H. Showers K. West R. Meade. 10:43 H. Percell • Z. MaU J. Jakobc W. Price. 10:30 G. Bloom F. WelIhauscn • E. Addington • A. Hansen. 10:S7 H. Moore • L. Sammann W. Southall • C. Brown. 11:04 R. Birchum • P. Pond • R. Dean A. Baer. 11:11 J. LePire. Sr. • W. Spaniel R. Dotts 8. Povco. 11:18 J. Swaggerty • B. Youngs C. Chapman • P. Gonlales. 11:23 J. Steinberg • H. HendrU H. Gray V. Holmes. 11:32W. Bayer-E. Haupt D. Inghram F. Garvey. !' • • fff ft t Jaycees/Antique Rose in Women's Softball Hrst Place Through two and one-half weeks of play in the Women's Slow Pitch Softball League the Henderson Jaycees/Antique Rose team leads the girls with an undefeated 3-0 record. They are closely pursued by also undefeated J&K at 2-0. JCs/Rose got their third win of the season by barely outpointing a tenacious Baldy's Tavern team 3-0 with JCs/Rose pitcher Debbie Drake tossing the shutout on McDoniel Field Tuesday. In a game highlighted by good defense by both teams, JCs/Rose scored two runs in the top of the fourth and added one more in the fifth for the game's offensive output. The winless Baldy's team is tied for the cellar position in the Women's League with a 0-3 mark.. In Tuesday night's other game T.J.'s /Todd's won their second game of the season by pouncing on the Hoe and Hammer squad 13-1 on Trimmer Field. T.J.'srFodd's used a four-run third to establish dominance in the game and capped the contest with a five-run splurge in the top of the seventh. Hoe and Hamer tallied their only run in the bottom of the sixth. ^. — ^^^,_^ T.J.'s/rodd's moves to third place with the win and a 2-1 record while Hoe and Hammer also remain winless at 0-3. Baldy's suffered another close loss last Thursday on McDoniel Field as T.J.'sn"odd's rallied for three runs in the bottom of the seventh to squeak by 8-7. T.J.'s/Todd's took the lead with five runs in the first but Baldy's came back to take the lead in the sixth after scoring two in the third and fifth and one run in the first, second and the seventh. Last Thursday's other game saw undefeated JCs/Antique Rose break a 6-6 tie with one run in the bottom of the seventh to slip by Perry's/Terrace Mobile 7-6 on Trimmer Field. Perry's / Terrace Mobile took the lead with four runs in the top of the fifth to go ahead 6-3 a nd JCs/Rose t ie d the game in the bottom of the sixth with three runs. The now 1-1 Perry'sA'errace Mobile team host undefeated J&K tonight on Trimmer Fieldas J&Kattempts to catch up with first place JCs/Rose team. In Thursday night's other square off, Moly Corp meets Levi Strauss, both teams with identical 1-1 records, on McDoniel Field. Both games begin at 715 p.m. • ..;* • • • : • • • • -wm*.v. 1982 Nevada State AAA Baseball Champions— Top row. left to right, Head Coach. Gary Chaires, Kurt Barkley. Randy Marquez, Rich Purdie, Jay Ortolano, Bob Scucci. Joe Moyes. Ray Crunk, Jeff McComb, Asst. Coach, Tom Crine. Bottom row, left to right. Brent Cline, Blaine Reber, Scott Haney, Mike Groves, Kurt Wolven. Bryce Corr, Kelley Roundy. When it eomes to Sports you can Betonthe'Boat \ Basic wolves Nevada stale AAA iTZthainplonsiiip llVe Knew You Could Do r SHOWBOAl .^ RACE &• SPORTS BOOK FREE PARKING HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. Henderson Home News Boulder City News Green Volley News DICK BLICK ART STORE MARIO'S II HAIR SALON FIRST INTERSTATE BANK PlazaCentet^^Omce SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT DIRH DOG INN (GY) COUNTRY CUSSICS GEORGE & DEBRA WELLER FEREDAY MECHANICAL CONTRAHORS BOB & LORNA KESHRSON YELLOW FRONT CHECKER AUTO BILL MERREU'S TV & APPLIANCE DKK MONTOYA— ANTWUE ROSE FLORIST APOLLO VIDEO TOP HAT BURGER-Rolph's Bnck BASK PHOTO FIRST INTERSTATE BANK Henderson office SUNSET MARINE & TACKLE DISCOUNT BRITCHES KERR-McGEE CHEMICAL CORPORATION KOLOB FEDERAL CREDIT UNION SANDrS OFFICE SUPPLY VAN VALEY'S SHOES SAFEWAY-Henderson SENATOR HOWARD & DOROTHY CANNON BOB CASHELL, Cbaimion Boord of Regents, University of Nevada Systems HARRY REID MAYOR LEROY ZIKE & CITY COUNCIL LaPORTA INSURANa AGENa INC. LEVI STRAUSS ft CO. HOME MAGK SERVICE dUm PAT EMPSON GLEN ft LOIS TAYLOR BEN STEPMAN DODGE "in Henderson of Course' GATEWAY VILLAGE. APTS. PIONEER MORTGAGE CORP. H. DAN TAYLOR— STATE FARM INSURANCE AGENT Cin WIDE REFRIGERATION Eorl Floyd TED ft JEANE DASKAS ft FAMILY ASSEMBLYMAN JACK ft BETH JEFFREY DICK ft J'DEAN DERRICK ft FAMILY CARL HENDERSON ft FAMILY BUSY BEE INSTANT COPIES LARRY, PAT ft CINDY WICHAEL AND MRS. CARY JIM ft SHARON ASHE ft FAMILY ^ BASK HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1959 BASK HIGH SCHOOL CUSS OF 1962 BLACK MOUNTAIN GOLF ft COUNTRYCLUB ST. ROSE de LIMA HOSPITAL KENT, BETH, JAMES ft JERRY GOODMAN VAUEY BANK Hend Branch

PAGE 15

' • ? -5 .!5 T • ? T^T^ • N Page 14 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, May ZO, iwi Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 15 Guidelines By Al Cieri This column is going to be difficult to complete. Not that there is a lack of material to tell you but rather my arms are tired from catching fish! It seems a shame to waste energy pushing a pen when a person could easily attache his or her arm to a rod and reel and simply partake in some great fishing! Stripers first. Last week was good when they were hitting anchovies and subsurface lures but this week was, and will continue to be, what all anglers hope for. Its top water action at its finest with almost everyone enjoying the ultimate thrill of stripers smashing surface lures. Everyone fishing the upper Virgin Basin that is. The lower Boulder Basin has fish but has been slow to -::r€spond to top water lures and to anything else for that matter. In the past week fellow guide. John Harman. took David Decow and son. Paul Deluca and son. and the Rich Lee family of Los Angeles to the Virgin Basin and they all limited out on surface lures. Most of these people had not even seen a striper before much less caught one. So. with a little effort and patience the fish are available to everyone. Jim Goff and Bill Spellman, both fellow guides, also took advantage erf this great springtime surface action. Where? Well if you can find Walker Wash and have a boat then your search need go any further. Once you find it (it will be the area with at least two dozen boats so it should be easy to spot) then go to work with your lures. The best results have been with redfins and zara spooks. The best size in the redfins have been the 900 series and virtually any color will work. If you cannot connect with this lure then slow your retrieve speed and come to a stop if you have to. Use either a ^4 or T'i ounce zara spook and work it as per the instructions on the box. Color does not seem to be important with this lure either. Make good casts and presentations and you willccatch fish. If lures do not work foryou then switch to anchovies and hang on. If none of the above work, then remember that on May 22nd Nevada Striper will hold a casting clinic and graph demonstration at Calville Bay at 1 p.m. Also on May 22nd, Nevada Striper and Sunset Marine and Tackle will have a ^a^ Edward Bennett Williams, Baltimore Orioles owner, referring to the National League's notoriously conservative owners; "They're 100 percent for progress and 100 jjercent against change." f^ George Brett of the Kansas City Royals is going to try and be a big hit in the cinema now, as hell debut in "The Moving Picture Cowboy," a Tom Mix remake. George's only other acting experience to date was the Preparation H commercials he did after the 1980 World Series. seminar which will be held at Cannon Jr. High School beginning at 7 p.m. If you want to learn how to cast, use a graph, find and catch fish, then May 22nd is the day you can set aside for your whole family and "get after it." For further information call John Harman at 565-1459; Ben's Tackle 456-7171 or Ron's Tackle 361-5564. You can also call me. I'll be at Walker Wash throwing redfins or on Mohave whipping out "fat gitzits." Now for largemouth bass fans ... the outlook is good and the future looks terrific. First a name out of the past, Gary Wright, remember him? Well he finally patched the holes I put in his boat and is back to lowering the fish population. Gary spent two days with four friends from Hawaii at Grand Wash and Iceberg Canyon. They caught at least a hundred fish and a good share of them with zara spooks. Granted, Gary is no ordinary angler, maybe one of the areas finest but the point is. he consistently catches fish. What is his secret? Number one. he works very hard and concentrates on his fishing and he uses soft plastic baits and surface lures just like the rest of us, with considerably better results. Last weekend the Southern Nevada Bassmasters held a tournament with Ronnie Beard taking first place, Ray Thurston second, Steve Syvanie third and Don Solberg fourth. Now these "Bassmasters are also several cuts above the average angler but they use the same lures that the rest of us common anglers use. Mainly soft plastic baits and I am talking about things like-fat gitzits, spider jigs. boogie tails, and plastic worms. These lures are not new and they are very easy to use. Go to any of the tackle shops and ask about them. If they can't explain to you how to use these lures, then change tackle shops! Anyway, to press further on with this largemouth portion, Ron Kennedy and Clark Hamilton spent a day on Lake Mohave throwing fat gitzits and, yes, they caught at least twenty nice size bass. Even more important is that everyone is seeing nice bass and they seem to all be in good shape. Mike GolubiG brought in several three pounders using plastic baits, And. in a tournament on Saturday on Lake Mohave the winner used, you guessed it, soft plastic baits! Next week we hope to visit with Dave Jenny from Nellis Air Base and the rest of his angling friends out there who are maybe the hottest fishermen in the area. Gary needs some competition! Seniors Golf Annual Championship Tournament Sunday Parings May 23 Las Vegas Golf Club :J0 E. BowM • P Willir Jay RuiMII Bob Taylor. 8:37 J Wood! • D Hlchardaoo B. Graf W K. MartlB. 8:44 Hollli Harrii C. SumpUr L. Man|Un> Ray Mttki. 8:S1 M. J. Pike • R. MadlaoD B. Beaver • F. Bulteri. 8:U C. Mauccrl T. Stirling W. HarrlioD J. ArnoldicB. 05 R. Regent J. Pocock R. Chlaholm • D. Vitro. :12 J Kelly B. Turpen P. Narclnok • J. Dragovlch. •; It L. T Huff J. Herron R. Pugh • J. Dwyer. $:U W. Hobart J. Wlllia • D. Olaon E. Davit. t:33 P. Umpel J. McCarthy • R. Eada J. Elagrtn. f:40 H< Hackett H. Showers K. Weit • R. Meade. t:47 H. IVrcell Z. NaU • J. Jakobc • W. Price. > 9:M G. Bloom • F. Welhauten E. Addington • A. Hansen. 10:01 H. Moore • L. Sammann W. Southall C. Brown. 10^08 R. Birchum • P. Pond R. Dean A. Baer. 10:1S J. LePlre. Sr. W. Spaniel • R. Dotti S. Povec. lO-.tt J. Swaggerty B. Youngi • C. Chapnun P. Gonxalei. 10:n J. Steinberg H. Hcndrlx H. Gray V Holmei. 10:3 W. Bayer E. Haupt • D. Ingbram F. Garvey. Black Mountain C. C. 9:U B. Warner • S. Gordon • W. J. Barnes • John Wright. 9:33 U J. Heenan • M. J. Wendell J. Canniff Al DcFalco. :40 J. Fielding G. Brammer Joe Zacb • Nell Emigh. 9:47 W. Moskaluk S. Simmons J. Paul C. Cobb. 9:M A. J. Morasse • Herb Harris • W. Kaercher J. Thompson. 10:01 L. Maynard • J. Brugman • Stan Elliott • R. H. Thompson. 10:08 R. G. Sparks Bill Gearin • S. Palernostro • F. Cardno. 10:1S Glen Muchow J. Broderick C. W. Martin • K. Schwarx. 10:22 J. Doll D. TiltOB • G. Innocenii • A. Pierottl. 10:29 O. W. Clark F. PorterJ. Reible S. Rodda. 10:36 R. Luongo • S. Daniels • T. Campese R. Long. Ramsey (84) for a rebound in Tuesday.'s NFL Battle of Champions. Smerek's Cowboys lost, the consolation game of the tournament, 85-64. 10:43 J MIndcll • J Stcelman R. Marquis. J. Bob Graham. |0:S0 F Symons C Drew J. Scbell A. Paternostro. 10:37 G. Jock Wilson Harry Miller • F. August F. Kology 11:04 H. Cbrlstensen D. Batingcr W. Schranti • C. Page. 11:11 R. Peterson • otto LaCrow P. McEnroe • H. Knoi. 1I:18E TKoskiIan SmithD. BirdsoDg • K. Duncan. 11:2S Bud Bradley • Wm. Barnett W. Heimlick • V. Harlan. 11:32 A. Zink R. Roles D. Brown • L. Pederson. Las Vegas Golf Club 8:30 Bob Wamer • S. Gordon W. J. Barnes • John Wright. 8:37 L. J. Hccnan • M. J. Wendell • J. CannUr • Al DcFalco. 8:44 John Fielding G. Brammer-Joe Zach • NIel Emigh. 8:11 W. Motkaluk 8. Simmons J. Paul • C. Cobb. 8:S8 A. J. Morasse • Herb Harris W. Kaercher J. Thompson. 9:05 Lee Maynard • J. Brugman Stan Elliott R. H. Thompson. 9:12 R. G. Sparks • Bill Gearin Sam Paternostro • F. Cardno. 9:19 Glen Muchow J. Broderick • C. W. Mariin K. Schwan. 9;M J. Doll D. Tllton G. Innocenii A. Pierottl. 9:33 O.W. Clark F. Porter -J. Reible • S. Rodda. 9:40 Rome Luongo • S. Daniels T. Canpese R. Long. 9:47 J. MIndcll • J Sleelman • R. Marquis Jim Bob Graham. 9:34 F. Symons • C. Drew N Scholl • A. Paternostro. 10:01 G. Jock Wilson Harry Miller • F. August F. Kology. 10:08 H. Cbrlstensen • D. Baslnger • W. Schranti • F. Gradyan. 10:13 R. Peterson • Otto LaGrou P. McEnroe • H. Knox. 10:22 E. T. Koski Ian Smith • D. Birdsong K. Duncan. 10:29 Bud Bradley Wm Barnett W. Heimlick • V. HarIan. 10:3< A. Zink • R. Roles • D. Brown • L Pederson. Saturday Pairings May 22 Black Mountain C. C. 9:28 E. Bowes • P. Walker Jay Russell Bob Taylor. 9:33 J. Woods • D. Richardson B. Graf W. K. Martin. 9:40 Hollls Harris C. Sumpter L. Mankins Ray Mecki. 9:47 M. J. Pike R. Madison • B. Beaver F. Butters. 9:M C. Mauceri T. Stirling • W. Harrison • J. Arnoldsen. 10:01 R. Regent J. Pocock • R. Chisholm ^ Vitro. 10:08 J. Kelly B. Turpen P. Marcinek J. Dragovlch. 10:1$L. T. Huff-J. HerroaR. Pugh J. Dwyer. 10:22 W.HobariJ. Willis D. Olson E. Davis. 10:29 P. Umpel J. McCarthy R. Eads • J. Elmgren. 10:38 H. Hackett H. Showers K. West R. Meade. 10:43 H. Percell • Z. MaU J. Jakobc W. Price. 10:30 G. Bloom F. WelIhauscn • E. Addington • A. Hansen. 10:S7 H. Moore • L. Sammann W. Southall • C. Brown. 11:04 R. Birchum • P. Pond • R. Dean A. Baer. 11:11 J. LePire. Sr. • W. Spaniel R. Dotts 8. Povco. 11:18 J. Swaggerty • B. Youngs C. Chapman • P. Gonlales. 11:23 J. Steinberg • H. HendrU H. Gray V. Holmes. 11:32W. Bayer-E. Haupt D. Inghram F. Garvey. !' • • fff ft t Jaycees/Antique Rose in Women's Softball Hrst Place Through two and one-half weeks of play in the Women's Slow Pitch Softball League the Henderson Jaycees/Antique Rose team leads the girls with an undefeated 3-0 record. They are closely pursued by also undefeated J&K at 2-0. JCs/Rose got their third win of the season by barely outpointing a tenacious Baldy's Tavern team 3-0 with JCs/Rose pitcher Debbie Drake tossing the shutout on McDoniel Field Tuesday. In a game highlighted by good defense by both teams, JCs/Rose scored two runs in the top of the fourth and added one more in the fifth for the game's offensive output. The winless Baldy's team is tied for the cellar position in the Women's League with a 0-3 mark.. In Tuesday night's other game T.J.'s /Todd's won their second game of the season by pouncing on the Hoe and Hammer squad 13-1 on Trimmer Field. T.J.'srFodd's used a four-run third to establish dominance in the game and capped the contest with a five-run splurge in the top of the seventh. Hoe and Hamer tallied their only run in the bottom of the sixth. ^. — ^^^,_^ T.J.'s/rodd's moves to third place with the win and a 2-1 record while Hoe and Hammer also remain winless at 0-3. Baldy's suffered another close loss last Thursday on McDoniel Field as T.J.'sn"odd's rallied for three runs in the bottom of the seventh to squeak by 8-7. T.J.'s/Todd's took the lead with five runs in the first but Baldy's came back to take the lead in the sixth after scoring two in the third and fifth and one run in the first, second and the seventh. Last Thursday's other game saw undefeated JCs/Antique Rose break a 6-6 tie with one run in the bottom of the seventh to slip by Perry's/Terrace Mobile 7-6 on Trimmer Field. Perry's / Terrace Mobile took the lead with four runs in the top of the fifth to go ahead 6-3 a nd JCs/Rose t ie d the game in the bottom of the sixth with three runs. The now 1-1 Perry'sA'errace Mobile team host undefeated J&K tonight on Trimmer Fieldas J&Kattempts to catch up with first place JCs/Rose team. In Thursday night's other square off, Moly Corp meets Levi Strauss, both teams with identical 1-1 records, on McDoniel Field. Both games begin at 715 p.m. • ..;* • • • : • • • • -wm*.v. 1982 Nevada State AAA Baseball Champions— Top row. left to right, Head Coach. Gary Chaires, Kurt Barkley. Randy Marquez, Rich Purdie, Jay Ortolano, Bob Scucci. Joe Moyes. Ray Crunk, Jeff McComb, Asst. Coach, Tom Crine. Bottom row, left to right. Brent Cline, Blaine Reber, Scott Haney, Mike Groves, Kurt Wolven. Bryce Corr, Kelley Roundy. When it eomes to Sports you can Betonthe'Boat \ Basic wolves Nevada stale AAA iTZthainplonsiiip llVe Knew You Could Do r SHOWBOAl .^ RACE &• SPORTS BOOK FREE PARKING HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. Henderson Home News Boulder City News Green Volley News DICK BLICK ART STORE MARIO'S II HAIR SALON FIRST INTERSTATE BANK PlazaCentet^^Omce SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT DIRH DOG INN (GY) COUNTRY CUSSICS GEORGE & DEBRA WELLER FEREDAY MECHANICAL CONTRAHORS BOB & LORNA KESHRSON YELLOW FRONT CHECKER AUTO BILL MERREU'S TV & APPLIANCE DKK MONTOYA— ANTWUE ROSE FLORIST APOLLO VIDEO TOP HAT BURGER-Rolph's Bnck BASK PHOTO FIRST INTERSTATE BANK Henderson office SUNSET MARINE & TACKLE DISCOUNT BRITCHES KERR-McGEE CHEMICAL CORPORATION KOLOB FEDERAL CREDIT UNION SANDrS OFFICE SUPPLY VAN VALEY'S SHOES SAFEWAY-Henderson SENATOR HOWARD & DOROTHY CANNON BOB CASHELL, Cbaimion Boord of Regents, University of Nevada Systems HARRY REID MAYOR LEROY ZIKE & CITY COUNCIL LaPORTA INSURANa AGENa INC. LEVI STRAUSS ft CO. HOME MAGK SERVICE dUm PAT EMPSON GLEN ft LOIS TAYLOR BEN STEPMAN DODGE "in Henderson of Course' GATEWAY VILLAGE. APTS. PIONEER MORTGAGE CORP. H. DAN TAYLOR— STATE FARM INSURANCE AGENT Cin WIDE REFRIGERATION Eorl Floyd TED ft JEANE DASKAS ft FAMILY ASSEMBLYMAN JACK ft BETH JEFFREY DICK ft J'DEAN DERRICK ft FAMILY CARL HENDERSON ft FAMILY BUSY BEE INSTANT COPIES LARRY, PAT ft CINDY WICHAEL AND MRS. CARY JIM ft SHARON ASHE ft FAMILY ^ BASK HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1959 BASK HIGH SCHOOL CUSS OF 1962 BLACK MOUNTAIN GOLF ft COUNTRYCLUB ST. ROSE de LIMA HOSPITAL KENT, BETH, JAMES ft JERRY GOODMAN VAUEY BANK Hend Branch

PAGE 16

Page 16 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News AMMAtfUMjl itAAjl MW, AfO* Thuriday, May Mti9M Henderson Home News and Bonlder City News Page 17 Deadline For Return of Mountain lion Hunt Questionnaires is June 4 Success Lecture at Eldorado Nevada hunters who obtained a tag to hunt mountain lion during the 1981 season have until June 4 of this year to return the questionnaire portfon of the tag accordingto Nevada Department of Wildlife. The 1981 season ran Oct. 1. 1981-April 30 of this year, and according to big game specialist Mike Hess "of the total number of tags sold, only about one-third have returned their questionnaires so far." "Those who had not returned their questionnaire by May 7 have been mailed a followup questionnaire and this or their original questionnaire must be received by NDOW by June 4, .As provided by Nevada Administrative Code, failure to return an accurately and fully completed questionnairS^ill result in the denial of all big game hunting privileges for one year," Hess explained. The hunT questionnaire asks each hunter to report if he was successful, the area and number of days hunted, location of the kill, type of weapon used and sex of the animal. According to Hess, "The information supplied by hunters is valuable to the Department in the formulation of harvest quotas for future year's hunts. Although other surveys and study data are utilized, establishment, of maximum allowable harvest objectives by individual area depend greatly upon previous year's harvest." "It is iniiportant that all who receive the follow-up letter take the time to complete the questionnaire and insure that it is returned," he said. "Even if a hunter believes he returned his original hunt questionnaire, it might have been misplaced in the mail, defaced in handling or contained incomplete information." Hunters are required to return the questionnaire even if they wfere unable to hunt and are advised that it is important that the questionnaire and the address label are mailed back to insure each respondent receives proper credit. Never feel defeated again! It isn't necessary. You can find out ^ow to take complete charge of your life. Drop by the Balboa Room of the Eldorado Casino Sunday at 3 p.nifor a free "Success Without Stress" filmlecture (90 minutes). Many sensible, downto earth principles will be discussed. Find out the secret of unlimited energy, how to gain more strength and confidence. Following the film lecture there will be^ ample time for questions and answers. Friendly and informal. Nothing to join, no. obligation. For more informa' tion on times and locations of other "Success ] Without Stress' film lectures in the Vegas Valley, call 293-4444. Sponsored by New Life Foundation, a nonprofit organization. Applications Accepted For Reno Rodeo Steer Decorating Contest Teams wishing to enter the 1982 Reno Rodeo Businessman's Steer Decorating Contest have only until May 21 to submit their applications, according tt) Bob Martini, chairman oT the event. ^^ Twelve two-man (or women) teams will compete at each of the Rodeo's six performances. June 22-27. Accbrding to contest rules, one member of each team must hold its steer by a rope while the other tries to tie a ribbon on its tail. Neither team member is allowed to touch any part of the animal except its tail. The ribbon must stay tied and the steer must be held by its rope for ten seconds in order to qualify. A total of seventy-two teams will be able to compete in this year's rodeo. At Thursday night's performance, all teams will be from area radio and television stations. First and second place teams at each performance will compete in the finals on Sunday afternoon. June 27. OnJune21.aCalcutta for the steer decorati^ event will be hej^^Np Harrahs. the official 1982 Reno Rodeo headquarters. At the 7 p.m. affair, each of the 72 teams will be auctioned off to the highest bidder. Money colle(?ted at the Calcutta will be divided between successful bidders for teams that place first and second at each performance as well as first, second and third in the finals. Invitations to the Calcutta, at which complimentary drinks and hors d'oeuvres will be served.can be obtained from the Reno Rodeo Association. Businessmen wishing to enter the steer decorating contest can obtain entry blanks by writing Bob Martini. Reno Rodeo Association, P.O. Box 12335, Reno NV 89510. Entry fee Der team is $75. Self Hypnosis Course Offers Potentials Off Road Vehicle Use Slated For Discussion The Nevada State Multiple Use Advisory Committee on Federal Lands will meet in Las Vegas on May 24th and 25th. 1982. Among the issues to be discussed is off road vehicle use on the public lands. A panel consisting of off road vehicle enthusiasts, the Sierra Club, wildlife interests and the Bureau of Land Management will explore this sometimes controversial issue which affects much of the public land in southern Nevada. Other items on the agenda include a report on coordinated resource management planning, a report on the proposed Markey Santini Bill, a discussion of the "checkerboard land" situation irfnorthern Nevada.use of eminent domain by mining companies to acquire private ore bodies, and a review of the status of Bureau of Land Mangement lands in the Las Vegas area. The meeting will be held in Room 104, State Office Building, 2501 East Sahara Avenue, Las Vegas. The meeting is open tothePublic. Leave 'AtjandonecT —Wildlife AloneSelf Hypnosis offers its users remarkable controls of one's own mental, physical and emotional destiny, according to Clinical Educational Hypnotist Andrew Sopko. Sopko has been teaching Laymen's Self Hypnosis courses under the sponsorship of the Boulder City Parks and Recreation Department for over a year. Sopko teaches class participants how to use self hypnosis for stress control, relaxation, smoking and weight control, insomnia, blood pressure and circulation control, pain control and self anesthesia, memorization, concentration and memory recall and ways self hypnosis may be used to overcome phobias, fears and unwanted habits. Participants learn how dream analysis is used in overcoming various problems. Participants are taught how to study in order to enhance memory and increase reading speed. Use of age regression in psychotherapy is discussed with ademonstration of regression being given at the last session of the 8 week training program. Sopko, who has been in clinical and educational hypnosis practice since 1969. states that by upgrading the self image level and-establishine a strong confident and positive attitude can help us realize unlimited potentials in everyday living. This is the premise on which Mr. Sopko works in teaching his class participants self hypnosis. He states that we have too often become the slaves of our upbringing, thus allowing ourselves to be alntost totally under the control of our subconscious minds, the mincj unable to retionalize beyond that of a seven or eight year old child. Consequently, very frequently, by our conditioning, we find it difficult if not impossible to realize our greatest potentials for success and good healthy. Sopko's new Laymen's Self Hypnosis class begins Wednesday. June 2 at the Boulder Senior Center annex at 7:30 p.m. The fee for the course is $65 for eight weeks. To register and for further information phone Boulder City Parks and Recreation Department at 293-3956. Participants are requested to bring cassette recorders and ample tapes for each class session. JACKPOTS PLUS The average American man Is five feet, eight inches tall. The average American woman, five feet, four inches tall. By Charles Crunderi Winter has turned to spring and this year's crop of newly born birds and animals will soon be showing throughout the wild as well as urban areas of Nevada. Department of Wildlife is requesting that all persons leave these wildlife be and not take them home to a life of captivity. "In just about every case." explained David Rice, wildlife information chief, "these young creatures have not been abandoned but have a parent concealed nearby waiting for the human intruder to leave." "There is no doubt that most people's intentions are good when they rescue what appeares to be a lost wildling; but in reality, their removal from the environment they are adapted to results in ha.rdships and problems for both the wildlife and their human captor. Raising a fawn deer, young duck, hawk, owl, quail or rabbit is a full-time job. even for the natural parent which is best equipped to do it properly," he said. —' "Young wildlife have special dietary needs which, differ significantly depending upon the species. Condensed milk, bread or canned dog food will not suffice, and even if it did, its dependency on its human provider would render it incapable of ever again surviving in the 'wild. Based on numerous past experiences, Department of Wildlife has found that most people tire of wild pets in a relatively short time and then attempt to find someone else or some agency to assume the responsibility for their care. "Just about every wild creature comes with a variety of ticks, fleas or lice; some of which may be carriers of very serious human diseases. They are also equipped with teeth, claws, talons or sharp hooves for defending themselves and will not hesitate to use them when threatened. "Finally, there is the question of legality. It is unlawful to capture game birds or game animals and keep them in captivity. All hawks and owls are protected by state and federal laws and may not be possessed without first obtaining a permit to practice falconry. Virtually every songbird is protected by law as are their nests, eggs and young," Rice said. "The best thing to do is look, enjoy and photograph, but leave all wildlife where you find them." MARK ANGELES, M.D. Announces the opening of his second PEDIATRIC OFFICE at 895 Adams St. Boulder City Phone 293-0406 hours by appointment only CUSTOM HOMES & §G ROOM ADDITIONS ib COMPLETE DESIGN k CONSTRUCTION For All Your Remodeling & Building Needs FREE ESTIMATES STEVERSON ENTERPRISES 3S26 E. Uk MMd, No. La* Vga • Lie. 19547 'Call' 649-2385 $ FREE GIFTS $ TIM: \IOST IIBKKAI< TIM: >I(ST IIBKKAISLOT E FRIENDLY >IA( IMM:S IN TIII: ( ITY NOW ^ PAY >IOKK ATTIIK FKIKNDI.V r%#| IJLir SKVLINK KVKKY TI.MK YOl HIT I LIN t ^ .1 \( KIM)T YOl WILL ((HT,F( T • • • • ^ • VOIK \VI\NIN(.S IMA S VAM KINn a AMM: KI;I)K.\II'TI()N (OIPONS, Jinvr Ot (,(MU) FOR H()>1K AI'FLIANIKS TAURANT JKWKI.KY. t AMKHA.S, WAT( IIKS (ilFTS WHFKF YOl FXI>K( T THF FINKST & GKT IT SATURDAY, MAY 22ND WBC Lightweight Championship Alexis ARGUELLO Andrew GANIGAN tor tU l\r(iiriniin; Vl.s, TIcHets: $100, $50. $3a $15 Doors Open: Ham 736-0111 Student Loan Budget Battle May Prolong Cunwt Recession OuaSKcations Explahed The U.S. Department of Education today announced the schedule' for determining a stude'nt's need for a subsidized Guaranteed Student Loan $2,630 and be eligible for the maximum subsidized undergraduate 'ZSSL. If the cost of edu•^etttion were $8,000, the r^Sttdent would show 'XS^d for $1,130 and be eliKibl.e for a subsidized loan in that amount. Example 1: Cost of Education .. $9,500 minus Available Resources, ($5,870 plus $1,000) ... $6,870. Student need ... $2,630. — Example 2: Cost of Education .. $8,000 minus Available Resources ($5,870 plus $1,000) ... $6,870, Student need ... $1,130. When no need is shown, a student or the parent may still borrow under the PLUS loan, program. The GSL program was authorized in the Higher Education Act ov 1965. The need analysis requirement was imposed by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981 and went into effect October 1. 1981. Today, nearly $30 billion has been borrowed through the program and nearly $7.8 billion of that total was borrowed last year. For the most part, loan principal is provided by the private lending community but some states also are direct lenders. The loans are insured by the Nevada Department of Education or reinsured by the Federal government. The Nevada Department of Education is the Guarantee Agency for the Nevada program and has been responsible for administering the program since July 1,1969. During the past twelve years the Department has guaranteed approximatey 20,000 loans for Nevada residents. The First Interstate Bank of Nevada at Reno and Las Vegaifcjiave been the primary lenders from inspection. The Citibank (New York State), N.A. became a lender during the summer of 1981 and the Cumorah Credit Union of Las Vegas became an eligible lender for the GSL and PLUS program in April 1982. Graduate and undergraduate students needing financial assistance for their postsecondary education may apply for loans undTer the program by contacting the Financial Aid Officer of the university, college or school of his her choice and completing the necessary application forms. To be eligible to participate in the program a person must be a Nevada resident, accepted for enrollment, or is enrolled in good standing and making satisfactory pro(rr<'-s at an approv '. jucational instiiuuon or accepted for enrollment, or is enrolled in good standing andmaking satisfactory progress at an approved Nevada educational institution, and who is pursuing a prescribed course of study is elikible to apply for a loan. For additional information, contact the NEVADA Department of Education, telephone number (702) 8.""-3108. Cavnar Challenges Fore's 'Leacf Sam Cavnar. Republican candidate for U."S. Senator, told guests at a reception in his honor Sunday, that his carpetbagger opponent's million dollar campaign to buy Nevada's U.S. Senate seat with false and misleading claims continues with public statements some outlandish, others quite subtle. Cavnar pointed out that lies and distortions continue despite the fact Rick Fore's credibility was seriously damaged recently with the exposure of his false claims of support by President Reagan, the White House Staff, Senator Laxalt and the. national committees. Also, his lie about living in Nevada four years. "In his May 12th C^mpagin Update mailer, the million dollar carpetbagger claimed his 'Reno and Las Vegas phone banks were showing 40 percent for his candidacy. 1 percent for everybody else, and 59 percent undecided,' Cavnar noted. "In the very same paragraph he claimed the polls showed him leading 3 to 1. He ought to at least make up his mind whether to use the outrageous 40 to 1 figures or the outlandish 3 to 1 tally. Both are far from the truth and even his large staff of paid campaign workers must find it hard to keep a straight face with those whoppers." Earlier in the campaign, Fore 'leaked' that 3 to 1 figure as supposedly coming from a confidential poll run by the National Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee. That lie was publicly refuted by the national committee's officials, according to Cavnar spokesman, Steve Edwards. At about the same time, the Central Surveys. Inc. of Shenandoah. Iowa poll which was commissioned and released by a group of gaming industry officials (and published in most Nevada Newspapers) showed Sam Cavnar leading to 2.3 to 1 over the nearest GOP opponent."Our polls continue to support these figures, despite the million dollar carpetbagger's wild claims," Cavnar concluded. {\F >t3U HAVr A f=t>R<:EP AIK '^HEATIMG SYSTEM, CHECK THE PUCT WORK FOR AlR LEAKS ANUALLV. A e>MAl.l. LtAK MAV BE CoVEKEP WITH PUCT TAPe. IMSUMJIOM or t>UCT5 5.AVeS EW6£<&y AL^O. -rH£.SE TIP& ARE F>!OM THE NATIOWAL ENERSy WATCH-AN ENERey EFFlCIE>JCy FftOblOM FBOMTHE' BLECTKIC UTILITY INPUSTRV. The continuing failure to reach a budget compromise in Washington, D.C., threatens to prolong a recession which has caused high interest rates and nationwide unemployment of 9.4 percent. Attorney General Richard Bryan said today. "I've talked with a number of state officials and businessmen Vho are genuinely concerned that the continued wrangling and inaction over the budget will further upset financial planning, which only keeps interest rates too high to allow a biM^£Ss recovery," Bryan said. Bryan pointed out that the effect of the recession on Nevada already is an 8.9 percent unemployment rate, a dramatic increase in the number of bankruptcies and business failures, a substantial decrease in hotel-motel room occupancy, and a multi-million dollar shortfall in projected state and local government revenues. "Financial planners nationwide including those on Wall Street look tx) the federal level for leadership and guidance. The federal budget is the central component of the entire process. Without it, investors and planners have no guidepost," the attorney general said. The proposed fiscal year 1983 budget includes parts of President Reagan's "New Federalism," a plan to transfer 43 separate programs back to the states for funding and administration. Bryan, a Democratic candidate for governor, said he agrees with the concept of returning decision-making authority to the local level, but he's concerned that Nevada SAVE NOW WHILE THE SEIECnON'S THE DIMESTI LAYAWAY NOW FOR FATHER'S DAY Sale Prices SUrt At n 89.00 AMERICAN FURNITURE SURPLUS OUTLET 1241 Boulder Hwy, Henderson "SirNoVi" >" 564-1019 may not be able to pay the price. "Nevada, with such a narrow tax base, may or may not be able to adequately fund the 43 programs which cover the entire spectrum from highways and airports to senior citizens and education. If we can't, the alternative under the current tax structure would be to either cut services or raise new taxes, neither of which is palatable to the public. "It seems to me that if we agree to take over these programs, then there must be a federal guarantee of adequate and continuous financing. It's clear that many of theseprogramscan • hfi.st he adminiatered at the local level, but we* must know where the funding is coming from before I can endorse the concept," the attorney general said. "New Federalism is basically an attempt to send the decisionmaking authority back to the local level -where it ought to be ~ with the additional aim of bringing the federal budget into line. But we must not let the federal government balance the budget on the backs of Nevadans," he added V** r^3: ^^H^"^^*""^^ "One Day Service Residentiol & Commeixiai We protect your Furniture, Carpets & Walls FREE ESTIMATES GMRYUK 1564-6380 WORLCa V PLATE 2 SECTIONS Designed Exctusively for the World's Largest Buffet. PLATE of PLENTY BREAKFAST/6 AM Td 11 AM • M m DELICIOUS ITEMS ^L I Peacheft. pari.griipfruitsections, ^W I frull cociilail, orange slicCb. canleloupe. honeydew melon, ham. bacon, country aautage, 3 types of eggs, corned beef hash, o brien potatoes, hash browns, chipped beef on toast, danish pastry, biscuits, blueberry mufnns. bagles. jelly, butter and honey, pan • cakes, waffles, french \9ast LUNCH/11:30 AM TO A Pfvl DELICIOL'S ITEMS including fried chicken, sea fresh fish More hot entrees than anywhere m town DlNNER/iaO PM TO 11 PfVI DELlCIOt'i ITEMS inclodiDg roast baron of beef and drltcious baked ham 41 LUNCH DINNER 2.49 *3.49 $199 1 BHEAKFAST on becoming STATE \\\ BASEBALL CHAMPIOINS We're cheering with you If you're having a graduation party see J&KII, your complete catering service GRADUATION $2195 SMALL TRAY ^— SPECIAL $3i|.95 URGE TRAY 5650050 CORNER OF PACIHC STREET & HORIZON DRIVE ^M^aM ^ • teitta^ ^^

PAGE 17

Page 16 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News AMMAtfUMjl itAAjl MW, AfO* Thuriday, May Mti9M Henderson Home News and Bonlder City News Page 17 Deadline For Return of Mountain lion Hunt Questionnaires is June 4 Success Lecture at Eldorado Nevada hunters who obtained a tag to hunt mountain lion during the 1981 season have until June 4 of this year to return the questionnaire portfon of the tag accordingto Nevada Department of Wildlife. The 1981 season ran Oct. 1. 1981-April 30 of this year, and according to big game specialist Mike Hess "of the total number of tags sold, only about one-third have returned their questionnaires so far." "Those who had not returned their questionnaire by May 7 have been mailed a followup questionnaire and this or their original questionnaire must be received by NDOW by June 4, .As provided by Nevada Administrative Code, failure to return an accurately and fully completed questionnairS^ill result in the denial of all big game hunting privileges for one year," Hess explained. The hunT questionnaire asks each hunter to report if he was successful, the area and number of days hunted, location of the kill, type of weapon used and sex of the animal. According to Hess, "The information supplied by hunters is valuable to the Department in the formulation of harvest quotas for future year's hunts. Although other surveys and study data are utilized, establishment, of maximum allowable harvest objectives by individual area depend greatly upon previous year's harvest." "It is iniiportant that all who receive the follow-up letter take the time to complete the questionnaire and insure that it is returned," he said. "Even if a hunter believes he returned his original hunt questionnaire, it might have been misplaced in the mail, defaced in handling or contained incomplete information." Hunters are required to return the questionnaire even if they wfere unable to hunt and are advised that it is important that the questionnaire and the address label are mailed back to insure each respondent receives proper credit. Never feel defeated again! It isn't necessary. You can find out ^ow to take complete charge of your life. Drop by the Balboa Room of the Eldorado Casino Sunday at 3 p.nifor a free "Success Without Stress" filmlecture (90 minutes). Many sensible, downto earth principles will be discussed. Find out the secret of unlimited energy, how to gain more strength and confidence. Following the film lecture there will be^ ample time for questions and answers. Friendly and informal. Nothing to join, no. obligation. For more informa' tion on times and locations of other "Success ] Without Stress' film lectures in the Vegas Valley, call 293-4444. Sponsored by New Life Foundation, a nonprofit organization. Applications Accepted For Reno Rodeo Steer Decorating Contest Teams wishing to enter the 1982 Reno Rodeo Businessman's Steer Decorating Contest have only until May 21 to submit their applications, according tt) Bob Martini, chairman oT the event. ^^ Twelve two-man (or women) teams will compete at each of the Rodeo's six performances. June 22-27. Accbrding to contest rules, one member of each team must hold its steer by a rope while the other tries to tie a ribbon on its tail. Neither team member is allowed to touch any part of the animal except its tail. The ribbon must stay tied and the steer must be held by its rope for ten seconds in order to qualify. A total of seventy-two teams will be able to compete in this year's rodeo. At Thursday night's performance, all teams will be from area radio and television stations. First and second place teams at each performance will compete in the finals on Sunday afternoon. June 27. OnJune21.aCalcutta for the steer decorati^ event will be hej^^Np Harrahs. the official 1982 Reno Rodeo headquarters. At the 7 p.m. affair, each of the 72 teams will be auctioned off to the highest bidder. Money colle(?ted at the Calcutta will be divided between successful bidders for teams that place first and second at each performance as well as first, second and third in the finals. Invitations to the Calcutta, at which complimentary drinks and hors d'oeuvres will be served.can be obtained from the Reno Rodeo Association. Businessmen wishing to enter the steer decorating contest can obtain entry blanks by writing Bob Martini. Reno Rodeo Association, P.O. Box 12335, Reno NV 89510. Entry fee Der team is $75. Self Hypnosis Course Offers Potentials Off Road Vehicle Use Slated For Discussion The Nevada State Multiple Use Advisory Committee on Federal Lands will meet in Las Vegas on May 24th and 25th. 1982. Among the issues to be discussed is off road vehicle use on the public lands. A panel consisting of off road vehicle enthusiasts, the Sierra Club, wildlife interests and the Bureau of Land Management will explore this sometimes controversial issue which affects much of the public land in southern Nevada. Other items on the agenda include a report on coordinated resource management planning, a report on the proposed Markey Santini Bill, a discussion of the "checkerboard land" situation irfnorthern Nevada.use of eminent domain by mining companies to acquire private ore bodies, and a review of the status of Bureau of Land Mangement lands in the Las Vegas area. The meeting will be held in Room 104, State Office Building, 2501 East Sahara Avenue, Las Vegas. The meeting is open tothePublic. Leave 'AtjandonecT —Wildlife AloneSelf Hypnosis offers its users remarkable controls of one's own mental, physical and emotional destiny, according to Clinical Educational Hypnotist Andrew Sopko. Sopko has been teaching Laymen's Self Hypnosis courses under the sponsorship of the Boulder City Parks and Recreation Department for over a year. Sopko teaches class participants how to use self hypnosis for stress control, relaxation, smoking and weight control, insomnia, blood pressure and circulation control, pain control and self anesthesia, memorization, concentration and memory recall and ways self hypnosis may be used to overcome phobias, fears and unwanted habits. Participants learn how dream analysis is used in overcoming various problems. Participants are taught how to study in order to enhance memory and increase reading speed. Use of age regression in psychotherapy is discussed with ademonstration of regression being given at the last session of the 8 week training program. Sopko, who has been in clinical and educational hypnosis practice since 1969. states that by upgrading the self image level and-establishine a strong confident and positive attitude can help us realize unlimited potentials in everyday living. This is the premise on which Mr. Sopko works in teaching his class participants self hypnosis. He states that we have too often become the slaves of our upbringing, thus allowing ourselves to be alntost totally under the control of our subconscious minds, the mincj unable to retionalize beyond that of a seven or eight year old child. Consequently, very frequently, by our conditioning, we find it difficult if not impossible to realize our greatest potentials for success and good healthy. Sopko's new Laymen's Self Hypnosis class begins Wednesday. June 2 at the Boulder Senior Center annex at 7:30 p.m. The fee for the course is $65 for eight weeks. To register and for further information phone Boulder City Parks and Recreation Department at 293-3956. Participants are requested to bring cassette recorders and ample tapes for each class session. JACKPOTS PLUS The average American man Is five feet, eight inches tall. The average American woman, five feet, four inches tall. By Charles Crunderi Winter has turned to spring and this year's crop of newly born birds and animals will soon be showing throughout the wild as well as urban areas of Nevada. Department of Wildlife is requesting that all persons leave these wildlife be and not take them home to a life of captivity. "In just about every case." explained David Rice, wildlife information chief, "these young creatures have not been abandoned but have a parent concealed nearby waiting for the human intruder to leave." "There is no doubt that most people's intentions are good when they rescue what appeares to be a lost wildling; but in reality, their removal from the environment they are adapted to results in ha.rdships and problems for both the wildlife and their human captor. Raising a fawn deer, young duck, hawk, owl, quail or rabbit is a full-time job. even for the natural parent which is best equipped to do it properly," he said. —' "Young wildlife have special dietary needs which, differ significantly depending upon the species. Condensed milk, bread or canned dog food will not suffice, and even if it did, its dependency on its human provider would render it incapable of ever again surviving in the 'wild. Based on numerous past experiences, Department of Wildlife has found that most people tire of wild pets in a relatively short time and then attempt to find someone else or some agency to assume the responsibility for their care. "Just about every wild creature comes with a variety of ticks, fleas or lice; some of which may be carriers of very serious human diseases. They are also equipped with teeth, claws, talons or sharp hooves for defending themselves and will not hesitate to use them when threatened. "Finally, there is the question of legality. It is unlawful to capture game birds or game animals and keep them in captivity. All hawks and owls are protected by state and federal laws and may not be possessed without first obtaining a permit to practice falconry. Virtually every songbird is protected by law as are their nests, eggs and young," Rice said. "The best thing to do is look, enjoy and photograph, but leave all wildlife where you find them." MARK ANGELES, M.D. Announces the opening of his second PEDIATRIC OFFICE at 895 Adams St. Boulder City Phone 293-0406 hours by appointment only CUSTOM HOMES & §G ROOM ADDITIONS ib COMPLETE DESIGN k CONSTRUCTION For All Your Remodeling & Building Needs FREE ESTIMATES STEVERSON ENTERPRISES 3S26 E. Uk MMd, No. La* Vga • Lie. 19547 'Call' 649-2385 $ FREE GIFTS $ TIM: \IOST IIBKKAI< TIM: >I(ST IIBKKAISLOT E FRIENDLY >IA( IMM:S IN TIII: ( ITY NOW ^ PAY >IOKK ATTIIK FKIKNDI.V r%#| IJLir SKVLINK KVKKY TI.MK YOl HIT I LIN t ^ .1 \( KIM)T YOl WILL ((HT,F( T • • • • ^ • VOIK \VI\NIN(.S IMA S VAM KINn a AMM: KI;I)K.\II'TI()N (OIPONS, Jinvr Ot (,(MU) FOR H()>1K AI'FLIANIKS TAURANT JKWKI.KY. t AMKHA.S, WAT( IIKS (ilFTS WHFKF YOl FXI>K( T THF FINKST & GKT IT SATURDAY, MAY 22ND WBC Lightweight Championship Alexis ARGUELLO Andrew GANIGAN tor tU l\r(iiriniin; Vl.s, TIcHets: $100, $50. $3a $15 Doors Open: Ham 736-0111 Student Loan Budget Battle May Prolong Cunwt Recession OuaSKcations Explahed The U.S. Department of Education today announced the schedule' for determining a stude'nt's need for a subsidized Guaranteed Student Loan $2,630 and be eligible for the maximum subsidized undergraduate 'ZSSL. If the cost of edu•^etttion were $8,000, the r^Sttdent would show 'XS^d for $1,130 and be eliKibl.e for a subsidized loan in that amount. Example 1: Cost of Education .. $9,500 minus Available Resources, ($5,870 plus $1,000) ... $6,870. Student need ... $2,630. — Example 2: Cost of Education .. $8,000 minus Available Resources ($5,870 plus $1,000) ... $6,870, Student need ... $1,130. When no need is shown, a student or the parent may still borrow under the PLUS loan, program. The GSL program was authorized in the Higher Education Act ov 1965. The need analysis requirement was imposed by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981 and went into effect October 1. 1981. Today, nearly $30 billion has been borrowed through the program and nearly $7.8 billion of that total was borrowed last year. For the most part, loan principal is provided by the private lending community but some states also are direct lenders. The loans are insured by the Nevada Department of Education or reinsured by the Federal government. The Nevada Department of Education is the Guarantee Agency for the Nevada program and has been responsible for administering the program since July 1,1969. During the past twelve years the Department has guaranteed approximatey 20,000 loans for Nevada residents. The First Interstate Bank of Nevada at Reno and Las Vegaifcjiave been the primary lenders from inspection. The Citibank (New York State), N.A. became a lender during the summer of 1981 and the Cumorah Credit Union of Las Vegas became an eligible lender for the GSL and PLUS program in April 1982. Graduate and undergraduate students needing financial assistance for their postsecondary education may apply for loans undTer the program by contacting the Financial Aid Officer of the university, college or school of his her choice and completing the necessary application forms. To be eligible to participate in the program a person must be a Nevada resident, accepted for enrollment, or is enrolled in good standing and making satisfactory pro(rr<'-s at an approv '. jucational instiiuuon or accepted for enrollment, or is enrolled in good standing andmaking satisfactory progress at an approved Nevada educational institution, and who is pursuing a prescribed course of study is elikible to apply for a loan. For additional information, contact the NEVADA Department of Education, telephone number (702) 8.""-3108. Cavnar Challenges Fore's 'Leacf Sam Cavnar. Republican candidate for U."S. Senator, told guests at a reception in his honor Sunday, that his carpetbagger opponent's million dollar campaign to buy Nevada's U.S. Senate seat with false and misleading claims continues with public statements some outlandish, others quite subtle. Cavnar pointed out that lies and distortions continue despite the fact Rick Fore's credibility was seriously damaged recently with the exposure of his false claims of support by President Reagan, the White House Staff, Senator Laxalt and the. national committees. Also, his lie about living in Nevada four years. "In his May 12th C^mpagin Update mailer, the million dollar carpetbagger claimed his 'Reno and Las Vegas phone banks were showing 40 percent for his candidacy. 1 percent for everybody else, and 59 percent undecided,' Cavnar noted. "In the very same paragraph he claimed the polls showed him leading 3 to 1. He ought to at least make up his mind whether to use the outrageous 40 to 1 figures or the outlandish 3 to 1 tally. Both are far from the truth and even his large staff of paid campaign workers must find it hard to keep a straight face with those whoppers." Earlier in the campaign, Fore 'leaked' that 3 to 1 figure as supposedly coming from a confidential poll run by the National Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee. That lie was publicly refuted by the national committee's officials, according to Cavnar spokesman, Steve Edwards. At about the same time, the Central Surveys. Inc. of Shenandoah. Iowa poll which was commissioned and released by a group of gaming industry officials (and published in most Nevada Newspapers) showed Sam Cavnar leading to 2.3 to 1 over the nearest GOP opponent."Our polls continue to support these figures, despite the million dollar carpetbagger's wild claims," Cavnar concluded. {\F >t3U HAVr A f=t>R<:EP AIK '^HEATIMG SYSTEM, CHECK THE PUCT WORK FOR AlR LEAKS ANUALLV. A e>MAl.l. LtAK MAV BE CoVEKEP WITH PUCT TAPe. IMSUMJIOM or t>UCT5 5.AVeS EW6£<&y AL^O. -rH£.SE TIP& ARE F>!OM THE NATIOWAL ENERSy WATCH-AN ENERey EFFlCIE>JCy FftOblOM FBOMTHE' BLECTKIC UTILITY INPUSTRV. The continuing failure to reach a budget compromise in Washington, D.C., threatens to prolong a recession which has caused high interest rates and nationwide unemployment of 9.4 percent. Attorney General Richard Bryan said today. "I've talked with a number of state officials and businessmen Vho are genuinely concerned that the continued wrangling and inaction over the budget will further upset financial planning, which only keeps interest rates too high to allow a biM^£Ss recovery," Bryan said. Bryan pointed out that the effect of the recession on Nevada already is an 8.9 percent unemployment rate, a dramatic increase in the number of bankruptcies and business failures, a substantial decrease in hotel-motel room occupancy, and a multi-million dollar shortfall in projected state and local government revenues. "Financial planners nationwide including those on Wall Street look tx) the federal level for leadership and guidance. The federal budget is the central component of the entire process. Without it, investors and planners have no guidepost," the attorney general said. The proposed fiscal year 1983 budget includes parts of President Reagan's "New Federalism," a plan to transfer 43 separate programs back to the states for funding and administration. Bryan, a Democratic candidate for governor, said he agrees with the concept of returning decision-making authority to the local level, but he's concerned that Nevada SAVE NOW WHILE THE SEIECnON'S THE DIMESTI LAYAWAY NOW FOR FATHER'S DAY Sale Prices SUrt At n 89.00 AMERICAN FURNITURE SURPLUS OUTLET 1241 Boulder Hwy, Henderson "SirNoVi" >" 564-1019 may not be able to pay the price. "Nevada, with such a narrow tax base, may or may not be able to adequately fund the 43 programs which cover the entire spectrum from highways and airports to senior citizens and education. If we can't, the alternative under the current tax structure would be to either cut services or raise new taxes, neither of which is palatable to the public. "It seems to me that if we agree to take over these programs, then there must be a federal guarantee of adequate and continuous financing. It's clear that many of theseprogramscan • hfi.st he adminiatered at the local level, but we* must know where the funding is coming from before I can endorse the concept," the attorney general said. "New Federalism is basically an attempt to send the decisionmaking authority back to the local level -where it ought to be ~ with the additional aim of bringing the federal budget into line. But we must not let the federal government balance the budget on the backs of Nevadans," he added V** r^3: ^^H^"^^*""^^ "One Day Service Residentiol & Commeixiai We protect your Furniture, Carpets & Walls FREE ESTIMATES GMRYUK 1564-6380 WORLCa V PLATE 2 SECTIONS Designed Exctusively for the World's Largest Buffet. PLATE of PLENTY BREAKFAST/6 AM Td 11 AM • M m DELICIOUS ITEMS ^L I Peacheft. pari.griipfruitsections, ^W I frull cociilail, orange slicCb. canleloupe. honeydew melon, ham. bacon, country aautage, 3 types of eggs, corned beef hash, o brien potatoes, hash browns, chipped beef on toast, danish pastry, biscuits, blueberry mufnns. bagles. jelly, butter and honey, pan • cakes, waffles, french \9ast LUNCH/11:30 AM TO A Pfvl DELICIOL'S ITEMS including fried chicken, sea fresh fish More hot entrees than anywhere m town DlNNER/iaO PM TO 11 PfVI DELlCIOt'i ITEMS inclodiDg roast baron of beef and drltcious baked ham 41 LUNCH DINNER 2.49 *3.49 $199 1 BHEAKFAST on becoming STATE \\\ BASEBALL CHAMPIOINS We're cheering with you If you're having a graduation party see J&KII, your complete catering service GRADUATION $2195 SMALL TRAY ^— SPECIAL $3i|.95 URGE TRAY 5650050 CORNER OF PACIHC STREET & HORIZON DRIVE ^M^aM ^ • teitta^ ^^

PAGE 18

• M | lli ^—X^ tmi^imifmtmit** -Mi#>MfaaMi|MW*MMaaMi ai indications in some areas of six inches of rainfall. The towns ofAIoapa.Dvertonand Logandale were receiving rainfall as well as water coming through feeder streams. When it was over, 760 cattle and 20 pigs were dead, 23 businesses were damaged and 600 acres of farmland needed rehabilitation. The President later proclaimed that flood area a disaster area. An interagency flood hazard mitigation team was sent to look at the disaster itself, at the consequences to the community and to recommend ways to reduce future flooding. Such a flood in a populated area has implications for all taxpayers, as well as for the victims. In the case of the Moapa flood, an individual assistance program was set up, involving the Small Business Administration, the Farmers Home AdministratiQH and the State Welfare Department. The State of Nevada shares in the cost of a disaster, Kronberg notes. Fortunately no lives were lost in the Moapa flood. Two earlier Clark County floods were not victimless. On September 14, 1974, a flash flood swept through Nelson's Landing below Eldorado Canyon, killing nine persons. On July 3,1975, two persons lost their lives when flood waters swept down the Las Vegas, Flamingo and Tropicana Washes in a four-hour period. Clark County is not alone, Kronberg warns, citing other recent flash floods. On July 29, 1960, Kings Canyon above Carson City suffered a flash flood. Several Sierra Nevada canyons above Genoa had a flash flood on^ugust 5, 1971, and in Elko'County suffered three different flash floods in August of 1961. Lincoln County suffered three different flash floods in July of 1975. Only six years earlier, that county lost recreational facilities, re• servoir capacity and aesthetic recreational scenery when a flash flood deposited sediment at Beaver Dam State Park. Why is a flash flood more hazardous than a rain-on-snow flood like the Truckeee Meadows suffered in the 1950s? Kronberg explains it is because a flash flood develops in minutes or hours and becausse the source is often in the mountains so there may be no visible sign of trouble until a wall of water rushes through an area. In the case of rain-on-jno'.v, th-ro '.c urv prepare, to sai.d'cuo ^-iti '.oc v:;._';, ilnecessaij. To avoid being caught in a flash flood, Kronberg offers some hints: 1. Stay away from natural streambeds, arroyos and other drainage channels during and after rainstorms. 2. Know where the high ground is and how to get there in a hurry. Remember that roads and trails which parallel existing drainage patterns may be swept away by flood waters. 3. Stay out of flooded areas as water may still be rising and the current is usually swifl 4. Abandon stalled vhicles in flooded areas if you can do so safely. 5. Keep alert to signs of wet weather, including rain, thunder and or lightning in nearby or distant hills. 6. Keep as informed as possible by staying tun^d to radio or television stations. If you are out of broadcast range, watch for indications of flash flooding like increased river flow speed or steady or rapid rise in river level. 7. Never camp on low ground or a flash flood may catch you while you sleep. 8. Use your maps to determine if you are on locally low ground. Our Favorite Recipes This week's recipe is contributed by Lois Butler, a resident of Camarlo Valley for just over a year. Lois is the administrative secretary for Ameri can Nevada Corporation, and her husband, Larry, is district claims manager for American International Adjustment Co. Their daughter, Andrea, 10, attends Nate Mack. This week's recipe is Chicken Salad Hawaiian, which Butler said "makes for a nice, light summei meal." CHICKEN SALAD HAWAIIAN (Serves 6) 1 pkg. (8 oz. Chicken flavored rice and vermicelli ^4 Cup mayonnaise or salad dressing 1 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. salt Vitsp. pepper 2 Cups diced cooked chicken IVi Cups sliced celery 1 can (20 oz) sliced pineapple packed in natura! juice, drain slices. Chilled Romaine lettuce H Cup coconut Vt Cup slivered almonds 1. Prepare chicken flavored rice tt vermicelli mix according to package directions, cool slightly Meanwhile mix mayonnaise, ginger, salt, and pepper in large bowl. Add rice.chicken and celery, toss salad to coat then cover and refrigerate for several hours to blend falvors. To serve line large salad bowl with Romaine lettuce, mound chicken salad in center and ar range pineapple slices around edge. Garnish with slivered almords and coconut. FIB Opens Showboat Day b Night Teller LAS VEGAS, The Showboat Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas be comes the secondcasino in Southern Nevada to open a First Interstate Bank's Day & Night Teller, Monday, May 17. The newest banking convenience, located in the Showboat Casino, will officially open for business at a special ribbon cutting ceremony at 10 a.m. Onhand demonstrators will show how to operate this 24 hour machine from 9 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. through June 11. Everyone participating in the demonstration can register to win a Sony Betamax, a Sony 19" color television or a Sony Walkman II Recorder. The Showboat is also sponsoring a special drawing for their hotel and casino employees to win a Sony 19 color television. Both drawi""gi will be h'^'d at 4 p.m. on Friday, June 11. The Showboat is located at 2800 Fremont, Las Vegas. Day St Night Teller servii^e allows First Interstate Bank of Nevada customers to make withdrawals, deposits, balance inquiries, transfer of funds and a variety of other payments. Cash advances on First Interstate VISA or Mastercard can also be obtained at the Day & Night Teller. First Interstate does not charge its customers a fee for machine. using the First Interstate Bank of Nevada employs some 2,300 Nevadans in its 65 statewide offices and has assets of $2 billion. I • For anyone who's H embarrassed himself H with a wide mouthed • yawn in the middle of • an economics lecture, a I budget discussion or a fi'iend's emotional outburst, the yawn clearly delivers one of two messages: boredom or fatigue. It's not so simple in he animal kingdom, s^ys the current issue of International Wildlife magazine. Animals do yawn bu( for a whole variety of reasons. The animal's yawn may signal court_^^ship, agression, warning or a need to create order within a group. The conventional yawn occurs when breathing slows down because of fatigue, inactivity or lack of sleep. Opening wide creates a sudden intake of aii (VUUt.a w~ Animals Do Yawn-But Not Just Because The/rel Sleepy YOU SAVE OR WE PAT Use all coupons with qlO miniinu:n purc)-a?^e DOUBU COUFOII H MdwAt fvlai'*' he* eiMvif pvnhm** <•#•**. Of****' <*•*•> •* d^ | • !•• •> • • (M4 Ih* votv* •! lt> .ff larlu^M liqww >bMM •ftd ^ dairy M • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • I that sends oxygenated blood to the heart. The heart, in turn, rushes blood to lethargic muscles, reviving a sluggish system, according to the bi monthly publication of the National Wildlife Federation. Some animals do yawn for conventional or physiological reasons. For instance, the javelina (wild boar) yawns to rejuvenate himself whenever he leaves the shallow depressions in the desert where he sleeps. But for other animals, yawns are mere weapons in territorial battles. Lizards and fish commonly threaten unwelcome invaders by opening their mouths. Bears and wolves open wide to bare their teeth before an attack. The hippopotamus displays perhaps the most spec tacular aggressive yawn. Two hippos trying to settle a dispute stand head-to-head and flash two-foot-long teeth in giant yawns. They have been known to match yawn for yawn over several hours before settling a quarrel, says Internation Wildlife. Baboons also issue threats with yawns often to establish pecking orders within groups. For the baboon, "the yawn constitutes a higher level threat than a raised eyebrow or a stare," says John Fletemeyer of Florida's Nova University, who has often seen these hairy animals yawn when choice food or a female in estrus is at stake. Lions, on the other hand, spread their jaws to calm tensions within a group according to Randall Eaton, a professor of animal behavior at Western Wyoming College. Female lions yawn frequently, almost in unison, to distract potential aggressors from their newborns. Some animals even yawn to invite clean-up crews into their mouths. A case in point is the crocodile, who can't move his tongue well enough to clean his teeth. He instead spreads his jaws wide so that certain birds can dine on leftover food amongst his teeth. Birds often yawn when they're courting. Consider the Adelie penguin's aptly named "ecstatic dlspay:" two penguins woo ,by facing each other, beaks spread wide, pointing majestically toward the sky. When animals get the irrepressible urge to yawn, they seem to know, as man does, when to stifle it, Lions, baboons and other animals that live in groups have perfected the technique, says International Wildlife. When they don't want a reflex yawn to be perceived as a threatening gesture, these animals look away or cover their teeth with thir lips. Lower ranking animals turn away from higher-ranked animals when they can't suppress a yawn. Take a lesson from the lion the next time you yawn at the wrong, time or in the wrong place. Turn your head, orCover the gaping hole with a hand Otherwise your weariness -or boredom -will be all too obvious. c? DOUBLE COUPON Ml Mm • • (l#nl*^w t*W• .:*m patv-Mr Im t faur tawpar.i p%i (uarvfnaB I M .1S C 30 >j-<:-Ma Oaarf ktof 34 I9C1 •) stl ta*vv ttaw • • ^ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • l 8U ....i i .i ^i. t (Mpan clang >w<(h *nf tn9 ntanufat)ura< (•wpan mtt4 f< iawhla ItM ••vmo* whan fn ^nhM t intluda rataiUf Ira* gratanr ^x K taw^an* firMH la' m aBaa4 ha OVIIM • Iha .Mm • • tlvdat '..^.^ latowta an^ dl *t.„, I Art ana rtaw ptt lawiMA Im i lav vpan ^i iuMam, • 1.0Mh.r<)MM OaadMv K-3* IMl •• all Sl*wo Warm • Skiers Benefit Cancer Society ox ^ -> CongiatuLaiioni to th& J^s^mocxati oj .-.. -r-r P1o£)YottrSsuBarFaa 'ill I.N'Tkhato From 8 l frxm ef*o<\. MCY 30:6 1903 In Clo-li Cu<- Ne>ad SMASH EM FOR CASH We Pay Cush Far CHch CleMn mni Smaslieri AlmHiiimii (— • Wl ACCIPT USA FOOi STAJV (tVfOIS SAFEWAY Presents: FREE Introductory Talk Sunday, May 23rd 1 p.m.. First Western Sayings & Loan 1000 Nevada Highway, Boulder City Main Topic: "What's The Good News About Deathr' A Question and Answer Period Will Follow Uk FREE DRAWING every hour 12 noon to 6 p.m. For Ice Cream Sundaes b Banana Splits GRAND PRIZE DRAWING need not be present to win PORTABLE PROPANE BAR-B^UE W/RBynVEABIi GRILL HOURS: MON.-SUN. 930 am—lOflO pjR ROCK PILE given av^y atSDO pjn. Must Be Present To Win .i-.. w..4^-A:>ny^ .. !iMw'.*^W> •I' '. iftift

PAGE 19

• M | lli ^—X^ tmi^imifmtmit** -Mi#>MfaaMi|MW*MMaaMi ai indications in some areas of six inches of rainfall. The towns ofAIoapa.Dvertonand Logandale were receiving rainfall as well as water coming through feeder streams. When it was over, 760 cattle and 20 pigs were dead, 23 businesses were damaged and 600 acres of farmland needed rehabilitation. The President later proclaimed that flood area a disaster area. An interagency flood hazard mitigation team was sent to look at the disaster itself, at the consequences to the community and to recommend ways to reduce future flooding. Such a flood in a populated area has implications for all taxpayers, as well as for the victims. In the case of the Moapa flood, an individual assistance program was set up, involving the Small Business Administration, the Farmers Home AdministratiQH and the State Welfare Department. The State of Nevada shares in the cost of a disaster, Kronberg notes. Fortunately no lives were lost in the Moapa flood. Two earlier Clark County floods were not victimless. On September 14, 1974, a flash flood swept through Nelson's Landing below Eldorado Canyon, killing nine persons. On July 3,1975, two persons lost their lives when flood waters swept down the Las Vegas, Flamingo and Tropicana Washes in a four-hour period. Clark County is not alone, Kronberg warns, citing other recent flash floods. On July 29, 1960, Kings Canyon above Carson City suffered a flash flood. Several Sierra Nevada canyons above Genoa had a flash flood on^ugust 5, 1971, and in Elko'County suffered three different flash floods in August of 1961. Lincoln County suffered three different flash floods in July of 1975. Only six years earlier, that county lost recreational facilities, re• servoir capacity and aesthetic recreational scenery when a flash flood deposited sediment at Beaver Dam State Park. Why is a flash flood more hazardous than a rain-on-snow flood like the Truckeee Meadows suffered in the 1950s? Kronberg explains it is because a flash flood develops in minutes or hours and becausse the source is often in the mountains so there may be no visible sign of trouble until a wall of water rushes through an area. In the case of rain-on-jno'.v, th-ro '.c urv prepare, to sai.d'cuo ^-iti '.oc v:;._';, ilnecessaij. To avoid being caught in a flash flood, Kronberg offers some hints: 1. Stay away from natural streambeds, arroyos and other drainage channels during and after rainstorms. 2. Know where the high ground is and how to get there in a hurry. Remember that roads and trails which parallel existing drainage patterns may be swept away by flood waters. 3. Stay out of flooded areas as water may still be rising and the current is usually swifl 4. Abandon stalled vhicles in flooded areas if you can do so safely. 5. Keep alert to signs of wet weather, including rain, thunder and or lightning in nearby or distant hills. 6. Keep as informed as possible by staying tun^d to radio or television stations. If you are out of broadcast range, watch for indications of flash flooding like increased river flow speed or steady or rapid rise in river level. 7. Never camp on low ground or a flash flood may catch you while you sleep. 8. Use your maps to determine if you are on locally low ground. Our Favorite Recipes This week's recipe is contributed by Lois Butler, a resident of Camarlo Valley for just over a year. Lois is the administrative secretary for Ameri can Nevada Corporation, and her husband, Larry, is district claims manager for American International Adjustment Co. Their daughter, Andrea, 10, attends Nate Mack. This week's recipe is Chicken Salad Hawaiian, which Butler said "makes for a nice, light summei meal." CHICKEN SALAD HAWAIIAN (Serves 6) 1 pkg. (8 oz. Chicken flavored rice and vermicelli ^4 Cup mayonnaise or salad dressing 1 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. salt Vitsp. pepper 2 Cups diced cooked chicken IVi Cups sliced celery 1 can (20 oz) sliced pineapple packed in natura! juice, drain slices. Chilled Romaine lettuce H Cup coconut Vt Cup slivered almonds 1. Prepare chicken flavored rice tt vermicelli mix according to package directions, cool slightly Meanwhile mix mayonnaise, ginger, salt, and pepper in large bowl. Add rice.chicken and celery, toss salad to coat then cover and refrigerate for several hours to blend falvors. To serve line large salad bowl with Romaine lettuce, mound chicken salad in center and ar range pineapple slices around edge. Garnish with slivered almords and coconut. FIB Opens Showboat Day b Night Teller LAS VEGAS, The Showboat Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas be comes the secondcasino in Southern Nevada to open a First Interstate Bank's Day & Night Teller, Monday, May 17. The newest banking convenience, located in the Showboat Casino, will officially open for business at a special ribbon cutting ceremony at 10 a.m. Onhand demonstrators will show how to operate this 24 hour machine from 9 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. through June 11. Everyone participating in the demonstration can register to win a Sony Betamax, a Sony 19" color television or a Sony Walkman II Recorder. The Showboat is also sponsoring a special drawing for their hotel and casino employees to win a Sony 19 color television. Both drawi""gi will be h'^'d at 4 p.m. on Friday, June 11. The Showboat is located at 2800 Fremont, Las Vegas. Day St Night Teller servii^e allows First Interstate Bank of Nevada customers to make withdrawals, deposits, balance inquiries, transfer of funds and a variety of other payments. Cash advances on First Interstate VISA or Mastercard can also be obtained at the Day & Night Teller. First Interstate does not charge its customers a fee for machine. using the First Interstate Bank of Nevada employs some 2,300 Nevadans in its 65 statewide offices and has assets of $2 billion. I • For anyone who's H embarrassed himself H with a wide mouthed • yawn in the middle of • an economics lecture, a I budget discussion or a fi'iend's emotional outburst, the yawn clearly delivers one of two messages: boredom or fatigue. It's not so simple in he animal kingdom, s^ys the current issue of International Wildlife magazine. Animals do yawn bu( for a whole variety of reasons. The animal's yawn may signal court_^^ship, agression, warning or a need to create order within a group. The conventional yawn occurs when breathing slows down because of fatigue, inactivity or lack of sleep. Opening wide creates a sudden intake of aii (VUUt.a w~ Animals Do Yawn-But Not Just Because The/rel Sleepy YOU SAVE OR WE PAT Use all coupons with qlO miniinu:n purc)-a?^e DOUBU COUFOII H MdwAt fvlai'*' he* eiMvif pvnhm** <•#•**. Of****' <*•*•> •* d^ | • !•• •> • • (M4 Ih* votv* •! lt> .ff larlu^M liqww >bMM •ftd ^ dairy M • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • I that sends oxygenated blood to the heart. The heart, in turn, rushes blood to lethargic muscles, reviving a sluggish system, according to the bi monthly publication of the National Wildlife Federation. Some animals do yawn for conventional or physiological reasons. For instance, the javelina (wild boar) yawns to rejuvenate himself whenever he leaves the shallow depressions in the desert where he sleeps. But for other animals, yawns are mere weapons in territorial battles. Lizards and fish commonly threaten unwelcome invaders by opening their mouths. Bears and wolves open wide to bare their teeth before an attack. The hippopotamus displays perhaps the most spec tacular aggressive yawn. Two hippos trying to settle a dispute stand head-to-head and flash two-foot-long teeth in giant yawns. They have been known to match yawn for yawn over several hours before settling a quarrel, says Internation Wildlife. Baboons also issue threats with yawns often to establish pecking orders within groups. For the baboon, "the yawn constitutes a higher level threat than a raised eyebrow or a stare," says John Fletemeyer of Florida's Nova University, who has often seen these hairy animals yawn when choice food or a female in estrus is at stake. Lions, on the other hand, spread their jaws to calm tensions within a group according to Randall Eaton, a professor of animal behavior at Western Wyoming College. Female lions yawn frequently, almost in unison, to distract potential aggressors from their newborns. Some animals even yawn to invite clean-up crews into their mouths. A case in point is the crocodile, who can't move his tongue well enough to clean his teeth. He instead spreads his jaws wide so that certain birds can dine on leftover food amongst his teeth. Birds often yawn when they're courting. Consider the Adelie penguin's aptly named "ecstatic dlspay:" two penguins woo ,by facing each other, beaks spread wide, pointing majestically toward the sky. When animals get the irrepressible urge to yawn, they seem to know, as man does, when to stifle it, Lions, baboons and other animals that live in groups have perfected the technique, says International Wildlife. When they don't want a reflex yawn to be perceived as a threatening gesture, these animals look away or cover their teeth with thir lips. Lower ranking animals turn away from higher-ranked animals when they can't suppress a yawn. Take a lesson from the lion the next time you yawn at the wrong, time or in the wrong place. Turn your head, orCover the gaping hole with a hand Otherwise your weariness -or boredom -will be all too obvious. c? DOUBLE COUPON Ml Mm • • (l#nl*^w t*W
• .:*m patv-Mr Im t faur tawpar.i p%i (uarvfnaB I M .1S C 30 >j-<:-Ma Oaarf ktof 34 I9C1 •) stl ta*vv ttaw • • ^ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • l 8U ....i i .i ^i. t (Mpan clang >w<(h *nf tn9 ntanufat)ura< (•wpan mtt4 f< iawhla ItM ••vmo* whan fn ^nhM t intluda rataiUf Ira* gratanr ^x K taw^an* firMH la' m aBaa4 ha OVIIM • Iha .Mm • • tlvdat '..^.^ latowta an^ dl *t.„, I Art ana rtaw ptt lawiMA Im i lav vpan ^i iuMam, • 1.0Mh.r<)MM OaadMv K-3* IMl •• all Sl*wo Warm • Skiers Benefit Cancer Society ox ^ -> CongiatuLaiioni to th& J^s^mocxati oj .-.. -r-r P1o£)YottrSsuBarFaa 'ill I.N'Tkhato From 8 l frxm ef*o<\. MCY 30:6 1903 In Clo-li Cu<- Ne>ad SMASH EM FOR CASH We Pay Cush Far CHch CleMn mni Smaslieri AlmHiiimii (— • Wl ACCIPT USA FOOi STAJV (tVfOIS SAFEWAY Presents: FREE Introductory Talk Sunday, May 23rd 1 p.m.. First Western Sayings & Loan 1000 Nevada Highway, Boulder City Main Topic: "What's The Good News About Deathr' A Question and Answer Period Will Follow Uk FREE DRAWING every hour 12 noon to 6 p.m. For Ice Cream Sundaes b Banana Splits GRAND PRIZE DRAWING need not be present to win PORTABLE PROPANE BAR-B^UE W/RBynVEABIi GRILL HOURS: MON.-SUN. 930 am—lOflO pjR ROCK PILE given av^y atSDO pjn. Must Be Present To Win .i-.. w..4^-A:>ny^ .. !iMw'.*^W> •I' '. iftift

PAGE 20

i Page 20 Henderson Home News ibd Boulder City Newt New President of Women Accountants Barbara Putnam McCrimmon. CPA, Will be installed President of the Las Vegas Chapter of the American Society of Women Accountants, June 2nd at 6:00 p.m. at a dinner meeting tobeheld at Maxim's HotelMrs. McCrimmon is an accountant with Alexander Grant & Co. o( Las Vegas. She will be installed by Marilyn Dille, past president of the Las Vegas Chapter of the American Society of Women Accountants. Others to be installed to serve with Mrs. McCrimmon for the. 1982-83 year include: Virginia Test, CPA, PresidentElect; Lianna Lervig, First Vice President; Verla Ebarb Ribgy, Second Vice President; Jean Evans, Treasurer; Anne Devine, Corresponding Secretary; Sharon McNair, CPA, Recording Secretary; Dr. Virginia Bakay, Barbara Morgan & Myrtle Knipes, Directors. All interested persons are welcome to attend. Call Verla Rigby for reservations at 384-7633. Barinra McCrimmon District Population High Figures recently released by the Educational Research Service rank the Clark County School District (CCSD) as the nation's 22nd largest public school system, up from a previous ranking of 24th largest. Of the fifty largest public school districts in the nation, CCSD posted a 15.9 percent enrollment increase over a''10 year period ending in the fall of 1981, the largest growth experienced by any district in the survey. CCSD experienced a 1.4 percent increase in enrollment from 1980 to 1981 and was one of only eleven districts out of fifty to show an increase rather than a decline in students over that period of time. Based on weighted enrollment, the survey shows the Las Vegas based district with 86.583 students. By comparison, the two largest school systems. New York City and Los Angeles, California enrolled 935,667 and 543,791 students respectively. A sampling of how other districts ranked and their enrollments are as follows: Indianapolis, IN (50), 55.536; San Francisco, CA (46) 59,709; Cleveland, OH (28) 74,919 and St. Louis, MO(39)61.319. Cactus Rebekah Lodge No. 40, I.O.O.F. had a double celebration at their Wednesday night meeting in the Legion Hall. "I Love My Country Day" was observed; and for the annual Friendship Night, members of other lodges in District 7 were invited. Dinner committee members Irene Reynolds and Adeline Hejny, assisted by Noble Grand Ardeen Sears, decorated the hall with small flags and patriotic streamers. At the family potluck dinner preceding the meeting, everyone sang all of the verses of "America the Beautiful", accompanied by Lorine McDougall at the piano". Later, Helen Moe read the poem "America for Me". All of the Rebekah guests were pinned with small corsages of red, white Cactus Rebekah Lodge Distinguished Nevadan Authors to be Honored The Friends of Southern Nevada Libraries is making plans for its bi-annual reception to honor distinguished Nevada authors on Saturday, June 19, in a private residence. Honorary Charrperson for the event is Tom Keevil, author of the Las Vegas Review Journal. The reception will honor those authors who have lived in Nevada for several years and have gained a national reputation for their distingjuished writing. To be eligible, the books must also be published by a national publishing house and available at the library. No textbooks, anthologies, published dissertations, or similar publications will be considered. The names of authors meeting the proposed criteria for selection should be submitted by June 1, to Nevada Authors, 3281 Heritage Way South, Las Vegas, Nevada 89121. Richard Bryan Speaking Schedule: May 15^June 1 May 15 Noon, Hawthorne, downtown. Armed Forces Day Parade. May 16 7-9:30 p.m.. Las Vegas, Rivera Convention Center, Nevada Jewish Federation Dinner. May 18 2:30 p.m., Reno, Nevada Legislative Steering Committee meeting, UNR. May 19-7 p.m.. Hen-' derson, Burkholder Jr. High School, awards ceremony. May 21 1:30-3 p.m.. Las Vegas, Hilton Hotel, annual meeting, Western States Shrine, welcoming address. May 22 -11 a.m., Henderson, Henderson Convention Cent'er, Hugh O'Brien Leadership Seminar, panel discussion. May 25-7 p.m., Las Vegas, Maxim Hotel, Lions Club installation dinner. May 27-5-8 p.m.. Las Vegas, Desert Inn Country Club, John Vergiels party. May 27-7:30 p.m.. Las Vegas, Orr Jr. High School awards ceremony. May 31 11 a.m.. Las Vegas, Palm Mortuary, Memorial Day ceremony. June 1-10 a.m., Carson City, Transportation Board meeting, Nevada Department of Transportation Buildin g. {x| Congratulations!^ To Basic Higli ON YOUR "Big Win'' (S We think the players and coach of (x) the baseball team, the student body and supporting faculty are: FANTASTIC SUPERB UNBEATABLE NUMBffiONE CHMMPS; MID 0 JUST GREAT SGNBlt YOUR NATURAL GAS TEAM CP NHTIONHL m (x)g](x)(ig)g)(x)(D(x) m and blue. The program committee presented "The Story of a Dozen Hats", showing regative and positive traits of the various hats. Those taking part were Thelma Wood, Ardeen Sears, Bonnie Woods, Margueritte Renaud, Marjorie Mecham, Dolores Gatlin, Mildred Kine, Mary Jo McClaren and Esther Shipp. At the conclusion, the conductor distributed pencils on which were inscribed the noble grand's motto, "Love one Another". Mary Jo McClaren was appointed inside guardian. Bonnie Woods was thanked for the garmet hangers she crocheted to hold the lodge robes. District Deputy President Juanita Parker presented a certificate of perfection to Esther Shipp. The lodge voted to support the project of Boulder City becoming a historical landmark. John Shipp is taking orders for the program of the Tournament of Roses parade. This book lets the television viewers know where their favorite float will be in the line up. Among the guests were Louise Leion, Noble Grand of Oasis R.L. No. 31 of Las Vegas; and Dora Strait, Noble Grand of SunThursday, May 20,19te I iiiursaay, may w, iwsA ncuU(&lUu kincrs HENDBSON SifeMiiyPlBi 5Bf224fl BOULDER cmr TSMVfl X^^^^'^^ • m^ • • • • COUPONH ^HH • • 1 IHH I ^W N.LV. By Ernest L. Newton Neviada's counties have, counted up their resources for the 198;3-jj^ fiscal year and the increase is only 1.1159'percent over last year.~Ftnanceswouldbe even more grim for the counties were it not for the,almost 15 percent increase in resources which the counties have had available during thl^'year now just about to end. The one brighf^spot is that if taxpayers are unhappy with a reduced level of service, the door is wide open for the voters to approve increased prpperty tax levies^ to augment the mone]r..already available.;.-.. One of the unfortu' nate aspects of the situation is that some counties are in quite serious situations for lack of money. Carson City, Churchill, Douglas, Esmerelda, Eureka, Humbolt, Lincoln, Lyon, Mineral, Storey and Washoe counties will have less resources next year than they had thisyear.Clark, Lander, Nye, Pershing and White Pine counties will have more. The composite result for all counties is a growth of only a little more than one percent. A few of the new expenses mandated by the 1981 legislature became the basis for additional property tax levies approved last month by the Local Government Financial committee of the legislature. Those additions are expected to add less than $2 million to the resources available to the county governments. The increase next year of a little over one percent compares with an increase enjoyed by the countfes in this current year of almost 15 percent and a growth of over 20 percent in the previous year (1980-81). There is little doubt that the demand for substantial tax reduction in Nevada was triggered by the growth of almost 50 percent in county government costs in the four years between 1978 and 1982. Taxpayers were so bitter about the skyrocketing ills for property taxes that "meat axe" proposals were the order of the day. Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed and the tax programs of 1979 and 1981 were effective in slowing the growth of the cost of county government to a stand-still. It is crystal clear that next year one of two actions will have to be taken: (1) The "automatic" pay raises for employees will have to be rejected, or (2) the In most counties it number of employees will be necessary to rewill have to be reduced. Or both. Personnel costs are a major part of the cost of county government and the inflated cost of materials and supplies makes it difficult to reduce those expenditures. duce or eliminate some activities now engaged in by county government. In most cases that will be possible if the governing board will list the various activities in the order of their essentiality and then start at the bottom of the list to delete those functions the county can no longer afford. Propsals (if they are made) to delete the most essential activities will be evidence of the cynical use of the "Washington Monument Syndrome." Businessmen's Gospel Fellowship Plans Picnic "The second annual all church picnic, sponsored by the Full Gospel Businessmen's Fellowship International, will be held May 22 at Sunset Park from noon until sundown. The park is located on the corner of Eastern tind Sunset, area D. ] Everyone is asked to bring his own food and join everyone else for a day of fellowship fun and praise. There will be live music, praise and fellowship. Nancy Shade Captivates Europe BOULDER CITY -Opera soprano Nancy Shade returns to her liome here soon, after triumphant appearances in Austria and Germany during the past few months, and three successful performances in the U.S. squeezed in between. The attractive and talented young diva starred in the televised world premiere of Prokofiev's Maddalena on EuroVision last November, originating M.LV. M3SN. Irucc ISMCIVopkana 407 W.Sahara 4*^S7S 73-S4 876-448 EXPIRES JUNE 30,1989 104 Cemnwrcc m4 N. louldcr Hwy. 38t-4994 M4-66M zmjji 1741 N. BOULOB) HWY. •THE FRIB^IDLY' SKVLINe 56&^116 RESTAURANTS CASINO "In A Class.By Itself HORIZON ROOM DAILY SPECIALS 'The Restaurant Made Famous by It's Friends' MONDAY 5 p.m. 9 p.m. Old Fuhioned HAM STEAK ONLY 2.95 PORTERHOUSE STEAK 3.50 PoUto-Baked, Maihd or Frlef. Salad Bar (all you can cat) TUESDAY 5 p.in.-9 p.m. Chicken Pried SnAK OR "21" SHRIMP ONLY 2.65 PoUto-Baked. Mashed or Friea. Salad Bar (all you can eat) •immmmmmmmmm k 4 THURSDAY 5 p.m.-9 p.m. '•''•v. PORK CHOPS WDrnilnc ONLY 2.65 CORNISH HEN W-DreiiiBf ^ _|^ ONLY l.dU N PoUto-Baked. Mashed or Fries. Salad Bar (all you can eat) WEDNESDAY S p.m.-9 p.m. NEW YORK STEAK OR PRIME RIB ONLY 3.95 PoUto-Baked, Mashed or Frie*. Salad Bar (all you can eat) ^y\y Nancy Shade li Tamburitzans to Perform f Ws*Kv.'i*.v.v.v.v'.v.v ^imsm^i^m 4 4 t SATURDAY S P m.-* p.m. NEW YORK OR T-BONE STEAK ONLY 2 OC FILET MIGNON* ONLY C OC CATFISH ONLY 375/1 PoUte-Bakcd, Mashed or Fri< Salad Bar (all you can eat) ^^^m^s^msi The Fabulous Silhouette Lounge IBanquet Room _^ Y Available Jf ^ "Where Your Favorite T Performers Perform Each Weelt Dancing & Live Entertainment FRIDAY 5 pjn.-9 p.m. NEW YORK OR T-BONE SnAK Trout Almondine ONLY 3 95 FILET MI6N0N ONLY 5.95 PoUto-Baked. Mashed or Fries. Sal ad Bar (all you can eat) Sj^m^ern Nevadans hayj|n chance to expetrence a feeling of vacationing in Europe :. on May 26 when the • world-famous Du'quesne University -TTamburitzans perform "^t the Las Vegas High ;^-School auditorium at 8 — p.njr"rte Duquesne (Pittsburgh, Pa.) Tamburitzans, an Eastern Eqropean folk dancing anci singing tfoup, were founded in 1937 and wesr^ the first lin&Bprsity-based perforftiing folk ensemble in the nation. Today the ALL WELL DRINKS ONLY 60< "21" TABLES Open Everyday 24HRS. Loose As A Goose $LOTS Over 94% Return VISIT OUR PLAYPEN SUNDAY 5 p.m.-9 p.m. ^/i BBQ CHICKEN OR WESHRN STEAK ONLY 2.65 PoUlo-Baked. Mashed or Friet. Salad Bar (ail you can eat) BREAKFAST DAILY 24HRS. ONLY 99' IflANT SHRIMP COCKTAIL ONLY ,1.00 HIGH HAND EACH MONTH FREE BUFFH )AILY HIGH POKERX HAND \niS^ \ EACH NITE NITES \ 2 STEAK WEDS-SUN\Q,N„(R ARCADE \ LUNCHEON TEEN •TOTS •MOMS POPS CIGAREHE $5.95 Carton Tax Incl. company is com_ posed of 40 students _:.iiaiJing from all parts of • ^Aiiierica and from a vacmty of ethnic and re> ligicSs backgrounds. T'he Las Vegas appearance of the Tamburitzans is being sponsored by St. Simeon Serbian Or'thodox Church as a :j2fundraiser for their ^buiI3ing needs. Fol—flowing the local performance, the "Tam3 Hmies" will greet the community at a dance in Ryan Hall, located at Oakey and Maryland ^(.Parkway. Food and refreshments will be served. In the past 42 years, the Tamburitzans have traveled thousands of miles, perfornringlOO concerts a season. Some of the countries included in their tours have been Yugoslavia, Italy, Latin America, France,. The Soviet Union, Greece and many more. The group's namesake is taken from one of the instruments used in the performance the tamburitza. The history of Jhe instrument can be traced to the Balkans of the 14th century. Included in the youthful troup's performance are scenes from pleasant European valleys where the spinning village dances of the peasant are displayed, and also the more rugged areas of Europe where the high leaps and acrobatics of the mountain folks can be seen. Brilliant and authentic costumes of the peasant folk are utilized in the group's true-to-life costumes of the various cultures. The Tamburitzans hav( probably the greatest assemblage of authentic peasant dress in the Western Hemisphere. Some 500 of the costumes are utilized in every musical production. A Tamburitzan must sing a dozen different European languages and even more dialects in performing the musical heritages belonging to as many countries. Along with the taburitza, more contemporary instruments such as the a c cordian Clarinet and violin are utilized. Chanting, dissonant voices along with the hypnotic beat of the primitive goatskindrumand haunting sounds of shepard's flutes add to the ,spiritual quality of the Tamburitzans' Performance. Tickets for the concert are $8 and $10; admission tQ^Ryan Hall is included in this price. For further information and reservations call Mary Ann Bianchi at 733-8261, Barbara Long at 384-6216, Helen Payovich at 362-0810 or Anita Ouke at 456-7733. from Graz, Austria, and shown "live". This was foHowed by performances in Munich, Germany, of two different productions of Puccini's Manon Lescaut, at Munich's Staatsoper. Her singing and characterization won the hearts of European audiences; so much so, she was invited to return to Munich this Spring, to star as Felice in Wolf-Ferraris' I Quattro Rusteghi, and as Musetta in Puccini's La Boheme. Then, immediately following, she performed Prokofiev's Maddalena, again, this time in Florence, Italy, having amazed opera fans and critics with her dramatic understanding of the role in the earlier television performance. Nancy credits her ability to portray such roles authentically, as well as to express her talent with control, to the help she has gained from classes here in self understanding taught by best selling author psychologist Vernon Howard. In between the Continental engagements, Nancy had a brief break to return home in January. She managed to work in a prestigious opera appearance and two additional concerts prior to returning to Europe. Nancy starred in the World Premiere of Robert Ward's opera Abelard and Heloise in Charlotte, North Carolina, which won rave reviews. Also, she appeared in concert at Duke University, and as guest solosit with the Albuquerque Symphony in that city's Popejoy Hall. The tough schedule to travel, the demands of mastering a variety of roles and languages, and the sheer difficulty of keeping her voice fresh and pure, seem to be staggering challenges. Nancy, however, tells us her understanding of her own inner emotional na?f llp.B.-3p.B.] ONLY 2.S0 STEAK & EGGS It ajB.-ll ajB. ONLY 1.99 >50./ 7-CARD STUD \rKII '$1-3 limit 10% rake Max Rake $2.50 Where You Expect The Finest And Get It \ S FAMOUS SAUD BAR DAILY 3 p.m.-9 pm. ONLY 1 JS Our Uiual Complete & ^xtensive Menu Also :fir '82 DIESEL Sale 37' VOGUE MOTOR HOME Come in & see the most beautiful motor home in the United Slates!! 1179 LIST PRICE $189,693 MAKE US AN OFFER WE CAN7 REFUSE! ALLEGRO 35' Catepillar pusher diesel on OshKosh chassis, really loaded with equipment. #1164 LIST PRICE $107,366 SALE PRICE 89,995 ALLEfiR0 2r 6 2 Diesel, completely equipped, power plant, roof air, arctic pack. stereo, cruise control, tilt wtieel, lust too many items to mention 1172 UST PRICE $39,995 SAUE PRICE '29,995 H you purchase sn RV before coming to Sunland RV, we txXh have lost money! SUNLAND RV CENTER 456-8046 "j;s; o?^K^ 3333 E. Fremont ture, through her psychological studies, not only improves her ability to handle the requirements of her profession, but keeps her from bogging down in the physical sense. From here, Nancy's next stop is Cincinnati, where both opera house audiences and radio listeners will hear her vocal beauty in a performance of Puccini's II Tabarro, reminiscent of her triumphant debut in the starring role of ^orgetta some years ago. Nancy was born and raised on a farm near Rockton, Illinois, and won a scholarship to study voice at Indiana University. Later, she won first place in the Metropolitan Opera National Auditions. Now an established international opera star, she moved to Boulder City about three years ago to avail herself of Vernon Howard classes. She has been a devoted student of his books and principles for more than ten years now. •*••••••••••••••••••••• i CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS J 27 WATER ST. I Free Food & flefreshments M 6-8 PM IHURS MAY 20th M BRING THE FAMILY t D. JIM JENSEN { COINTY COMMISSIONER "A" t, (•••••••••••••••••••••••* HfSMmde. ^ "B'HuaBw' T Hwy. 93 iNext to Hoover Dam Phone 2S3-5000 Congratulations To Boulder City & Henderson Graduating Class of '82 from Staff b Management ofthe OOLO STRIKE INN & C ASINO

PAGE 21

i Page 20 Henderson Home News ibd Boulder City Newt New President of Women Accountants Barbara Putnam McCrimmon. CPA, Will be installed President of the Las Vegas Chapter of the American Society of Women Accountants, June 2nd at 6:00 p.m. at a dinner meeting tobeheld at Maxim's HotelMrs. McCrimmon is an accountant with Alexander Grant & Co. o( Las Vegas. She will be installed by Marilyn Dille, past president of the Las Vegas Chapter of the American Society of Women Accountants. Others to be installed to serve with Mrs. McCrimmon for the. 1982-83 year include: Virginia Test, CPA, PresidentElect; Lianna Lervig, First Vice President; Verla Ebarb Ribgy, Second Vice President; Jean Evans, Treasurer; Anne Devine, Corresponding Secretary; Sharon McNair, CPA, Recording Secretary; Dr. Virginia Bakay, Barbara Morgan & Myrtle Knipes, Directors. All interested persons are welcome to attend. Call Verla Rigby for reservations at 384-7633. Barinra McCrimmon District Population High Figures recently released by the Educational Research Service rank the Clark County School District (CCSD) as the nation's 22nd largest public school system, up from a previous ranking of 24th largest. Of the fifty largest public school districts in the nation, CCSD posted a 15.9 percent enrollment increase over a''10 year period ending in the fall of 1981, the largest growth experienced by any district in the survey. CCSD experienced a 1.4 percent increase in enrollment from 1980 to 1981 and was one of only eleven districts out of fifty to show an increase rather than a decline in students over that period of time. Based on weighted enrollment, the survey shows the Las Vegas based district with 86.583 students. By comparison, the two largest school systems. New York City and Los Angeles, California enrolled 935,667 and 543,791 students respectively. A sampling of how other districts ranked and their enrollments are as follows: Indianapolis, IN (50), 55.536; San Francisco, CA (46) 59,709; Cleveland, OH (28) 74,919 and St. Louis, MO(39)61.319. Cactus Rebekah Lodge No. 40, I.O.O.F. had a double celebration at their Wednesday night meeting in the Legion Hall. "I Love My Country Day" was observed; and for the annual Friendship Night, members of other lodges in District 7 were invited. Dinner committee members Irene Reynolds and Adeline Hejny, assisted by Noble Grand Ardeen Sears, decorated the hall with small flags and patriotic streamers. At the family potluck dinner preceding the meeting, everyone sang all of the verses of "America the Beautiful", accompanied by Lorine McDougall at the piano". Later, Helen Moe read the poem "America for Me". All of the Rebekah guests were pinned with small corsages of red, white Cactus Rebekah Lodge Distinguished Nevadan Authors to be Honored The Friends of Southern Nevada Libraries is making plans for its bi-annual reception to honor distinguished Nevada authors on Saturday, June 19, in a private residence. Honorary Charrperson for the event is Tom Keevil, author of the Las Vegas Review Journal. The reception will honor those authors who have lived in Nevada for several years and have gained a national reputation for their distingjuished writing. To be eligible, the books must also be published by a national publishing house and available at the library. No textbooks, anthologies, published dissertations, or similar publications will be considered. The names of authors meeting the proposed criteria for selection should be submitted by June 1, to Nevada Authors, 3281 Heritage Way South, Las Vegas, Nevada 89121. Richard Bryan Speaking Schedule: May 15^June 1 May 15 Noon, Hawthorne, downtown. Armed Forces Day Parade. May 16 7-9:30 p.m.. Las Vegas, Rivera Convention Center, Nevada Jewish Federation Dinner. May 18 2:30 p.m., Reno, Nevada Legislative Steering Committee meeting, UNR. May 19-7 p.m.. Hen-' derson, Burkholder Jr. High School, awards ceremony. May 21 1:30-3 p.m.. Las Vegas, Hilton Hotel, annual meeting, Western States Shrine, welcoming address. May 22 -11 a.m., Henderson, Henderson Convention Cent'er, Hugh O'Brien Leadership Seminar, panel discussion. May 25-7 p.m., Las Vegas, Maxim Hotel, Lions Club installation dinner. May 27-5-8 p.m.. Las Vegas, Desert Inn Country Club, John Vergiels party. May 27-7:30 p.m.. Las Vegas, Orr Jr. High School awards ceremony. May 31 11 a.m.. Las Vegas, Palm Mortuary, Memorial Day ceremony. June 1-10 a.m., Carson City, Transportation Board meeting, Nevada Department of Transportation Buildin g. {x| Congratulations!^ To Basic Higli ON YOUR "Big Win'' (S We think the players and coach of (x) the baseball team, the student body and supporting faculty are: FANTASTIC SUPERB UNBEATABLE NUMBffiONE CHMMPS; MID 0 JUST GREAT SGNBlt YOUR NATURAL GAS TEAM CP NHTIONHL m (x)g](x)(ig)g)(x)(D(x) m and blue. The program committee presented "The Story of a Dozen Hats", showing regative and positive traits of the various hats. Those taking part were Thelma Wood, Ardeen Sears, Bonnie Woods, Margueritte Renaud, Marjorie Mecham, Dolores Gatlin, Mildred Kine, Mary Jo McClaren and Esther Shipp. At the conclusion, the conductor distributed pencils on which were inscribed the noble grand's motto, "Love one Another". Mary Jo McClaren was appointed inside guardian. Bonnie Woods was thanked for the garmet hangers she crocheted to hold the lodge robes. District Deputy President Juanita Parker presented a certificate of perfection to Esther Shipp. The lodge voted to support the project of Boulder City becoming a historical landmark. John Shipp is taking orders for the program of the Tournament of Roses parade. This book lets the television viewers know where their favorite float will be in the line up. Among the guests were Louise Leion, Noble Grand of Oasis R.L. No. 31 of Las Vegas; and Dora Strait, Noble Grand of SunThursday, May 20,19te I iiiursaay, may w, iwsA ncuU(&lUu kincrs HENDBSON SifeMiiyPlBi 5Bf224fl BOULDER cmr TSMVfl X^^^^'^^ • m^ • • • • COUPONH ^HH • • 1 IHH I ^W N.LV. By Ernest L. Newton Neviada's counties have, counted up their resources for the 198;3-jj^ fiscal year and the increase is only 1.1159'percent over last year.~Ftnanceswouldbe even more grim for the counties were it not for the,almost 15 percent increase in resources which the counties have had available during thl^'year now just about to end. The one brighf^spot is that if taxpayers are unhappy with a reduced level of service, the door is wide open for the voters to approve increased prpperty tax levies^ to augment the mone]r..already available.;.-.. One of the unfortu' nate aspects of the situation is that some counties are in quite serious situations for lack of money. Carson City, Churchill, Douglas, Esmerelda, Eureka, Humbolt, Lincoln, Lyon, Mineral, Storey and Washoe counties will have less resources next year than they had thisyear.Clark, Lander, Nye, Pershing and White Pine counties will have more. The composite result for all counties is a growth of only a little more than one percent. A few of the new expenses mandated by the 1981 legislature became the basis for additional property tax levies approved last month by the Local Government Financial committee of the legislature. Those additions are expected to add less than $2 million to the resources available to the county governments. The increase next year of a little over one percent compares with an increase enjoyed by the countfes in this current year of almost 15 percent and a growth of over 20 percent in the previous year (1980-81). There is little doubt that the demand for substantial tax reduction in Nevada was triggered by the growth of almost 50 percent in county government costs in the four years between 1978 and 1982. Taxpayers were so bitter about the skyrocketing ills for property taxes that "meat axe" proposals were the order of the day. Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed and the tax programs of 1979 and 1981 were effective in slowing the growth of the cost of county government to a stand-still. It is crystal clear that next year one of two actions will have to be taken: (1) The "automatic" pay raises for employees will have to be rejected, or (2) the In most counties it number of employees will be necessary to rewill have to be reduced. Or both. Personnel costs are a major part of the cost of county government and the inflated cost of materials and supplies makes it difficult to reduce those expenditures. duce or eliminate some activities now engaged in by county government. In most cases that will be possible if the governing board will list the various activities in the order of their essentiality and then start at the bottom of the list to delete those functions the county can no longer afford. Propsals (if they are made) to delete the most essential activities will be evidence of the cynical use of the "Washington Monument Syndrome." Businessmen's Gospel Fellowship Plans Picnic "The second annual all church picnic, sponsored by the Full Gospel Businessmen's Fellowship International, will be held May 22 at Sunset Park from noon until sundown. The park is located on the corner of Eastern tind Sunset, area D. ] Everyone is asked to bring his own food and join everyone else for a day of fellowship fun and praise. There will be live music, praise and fellowship. Nancy Shade Captivates Europe BOULDER CITY -Opera soprano Nancy Shade returns to her liome here soon, after triumphant appearances in Austria and Germany during the past few months, and three successful performances in the U.S. squeezed in between. The attractive and talented young diva starred in the televised world premiere of Prokofiev's Maddalena on EuroVision last November, originating M.LV. M3SN. Irucc ISMCIVopkana 407 W.Sahara 4*^S7S 73-S4 876-448 EXPIRES JUNE 30,1989 104 Cemnwrcc m4 N. louldcr Hwy. 38t-4994 M4-66M zmjji 1741 N. BOULOB) HWY. •THE FRIB^IDLY' SKVLINe 56&^116 RESTAURANTS CASINO "In A Class.By Itself HORIZON ROOM DAILY SPECIALS 'The Restaurant Made Famous by It's Friends' MONDAY 5 p.m. 9 p.m. Old Fuhioned HAM STEAK ONLY 2.95 PORTERHOUSE STEAK 3.50 PoUto-Baked, Maihd or Frlef. Salad Bar (all you can cat) TUESDAY 5 p.in.-9 p.m. Chicken Pried SnAK OR "21" SHRIMP ONLY 2.65 PoUto-Baked. Mashed or Friea. Salad Bar (all you can eat) •immmmmmmmmm k 4 THURSDAY 5 p.m.-9 p.m. '•''•v. PORK CHOPS WDrnilnc ONLY 2.65 CORNISH HEN W-DreiiiBf ^ _|^ ONLY l.dU N PoUto-Baked. Mashed or Fries. Salad Bar (all you can eat) WEDNESDAY S p.m.-9 p.m. NEW YORK STEAK OR PRIME RIB ONLY 3.95 PoUto-Baked, Mashed or Frie*. Salad Bar (all you can eat) ^y\y Nancy Shade li Tamburitzans to Perform f Ws*Kv.'i*.v.v.v.v'.v.v ^imsm^i^m 4 4 t SATURDAY S P m.-* p.m. NEW YORK OR T-BONE STEAK ONLY 2 OC FILET MIGNON* ONLY C OC CATFISH ONLY 375/1 PoUte-Bakcd, Mashed or Fri< Salad Bar (all you can eat) ^^^m^s^msi The Fabulous Silhouette Lounge IBanquet Room _^ Y Available Jf ^ "Where Your Favorite T Performers Perform Each Weelt Dancing & Live Entertainment FRIDAY 5 pjn.-9 p.m. NEW YORK OR T-BONE SnAK Trout Almondine ONLY 3 95 FILET MI6N0N ONLY 5.95 PoUto-Baked. Mashed or Fries. Sal ad Bar (all you can eat) Sj^m^ern Nevadans hayj|n chance to expetrence a feeling of vacationing in Europe :. on May 26 when the • world-famous Du'quesne University -TTamburitzans perform "^t the Las Vegas High ;^-School auditorium at 8 — p.njr"rte Duquesne (Pittsburgh, Pa.) Tamburitzans, an Eastern Eqropean folk dancing anci singing tfoup, were founded in 1937 and wesr^ the first lin&Bprsity-based perforftiing folk ensemble in the nation. Today the ALL WELL DRINKS ONLY 60< "21" TABLES Open Everyday 24HRS. Loose As A Goose $LOTS Over 94% Return VISIT OUR PLAYPEN SUNDAY 5 p.m.-9 p.m. ^/i BBQ CHICKEN OR WESHRN STEAK ONLY 2.65 PoUlo-Baked. Mashed or Friet. Salad Bar (ail you can eat) BREAKFAST DAILY 24HRS. ONLY 99' IflANT SHRIMP COCKTAIL ONLY ,1.00 HIGH HAND EACH MONTH FREE BUFFH )AILY HIGH POKERX HAND \niS^ \ EACH NITE NITES \ 2 STEAK WEDS-SUN\Q,N„(R ARCADE \ LUNCHEON TEEN •TOTS •MOMS POPS CIGAREHE $5.95 Carton Tax Incl. company is com_ posed of 40 students _:.iiaiJing from all parts of • ^Aiiierica and from a vacmty of ethnic and re> ligicSs backgrounds. T'he Las Vegas appearance of the Tamburitzans is being sponsored by St. Simeon Serbian Or'thodox Church as a :j2fundraiser for their ^buiI3ing needs. Fol—flowing the local performance, the "Tam3 Hmies" will greet the community at a dance in Ryan Hall, located at Oakey and Maryland ^(.Parkway. Food and refreshments will be served. In the past 42 years, the Tamburitzans have traveled thousands of miles, perfornringlOO concerts a season. Some of the countries included in their tours have been Yugoslavia, Italy, Latin America, France,. The Soviet Union, Greece and many more. The group's namesake is taken from one of the instruments used in the performance the tamburitza. The history of Jhe instrument can be traced to the Balkans of the 14th century. Included in the youthful troup's performance are scenes from pleasant European valleys where the spinning village dances of the peasant are displayed, and also the more rugged areas of Europe where the high leaps and acrobatics of the mountain folks can be seen. Brilliant and authentic costumes of the peasant folk are utilized in the group's true-to-life costumes of the various cultures. The Tamburitzans hav( probably the greatest assemblage of authentic peasant dress in the Western Hemisphere. Some 500 of the costumes are utilized in every musical production. A Tamburitzan must sing a dozen different European languages and even more dialects in performing the musical heritages belonging to as many countries. Along with the taburitza, more contemporary instruments such as the a c cordian Clarinet and violin are utilized. Chanting, dissonant voices along with the hypnotic beat of the primitive goatskindrumand haunting sounds of shepard's flutes add to the ,spiritual quality of the Tamburitzans' Performance. Tickets for the concert are $8 and $10; admission tQ^Ryan Hall is included in this price. For further information and reservations call Mary Ann Bianchi at 733-8261, Barbara Long at 384-6216, Helen Payovich at 362-0810 or Anita Ouke at 456-7733. from Graz, Austria, and shown "live". This was foHowed by performances in Munich, Germany, of two different productions of Puccini's Manon Lescaut, at Munich's Staatsoper. Her singing and characterization won the hearts of European audiences; so much so, she was invited to return to Munich this Spring, to star as Felice in Wolf-Ferraris' I Quattro Rusteghi, and as Musetta in Puccini's La Boheme. Then, immediately following, she performed Prokofiev's Maddalena, again, this time in Florence, Italy, having amazed opera fans and critics with her dramatic understanding of the role in the earlier television performance. Nancy credits her ability to portray such roles authentically, as well as to express her talent with control, to the help she has gained from classes here in self understanding taught by best selling author psychologist Vernon Howard. In between the Continental engagements, Nancy had a brief break to return home in January. She managed to work in a prestigious opera appearance and two additional concerts prior to returning to Europe. Nancy starred in the World Premiere of Robert Ward's opera Abelard and Heloise in Charlotte, North Carolina, which won rave reviews. Also, she appeared in concert at Duke University, and as guest solosit with the Albuquerque Symphony in that city's Popejoy Hall. The tough schedule to travel, the demands of mastering a variety of roles and languages, and the sheer difficulty of keeping her voice fresh and pure, seem to be staggering challenges. Nancy, however, tells us her understanding of her own inner emotional na?f llp.B.-3p.B.] ONLY 2.S0 STEAK & EGGS It ajB.-ll ajB. ONLY 1.99 >50./ 7-CARD STUD \rKII '$1-3 limit 10% rake Max Rake $2.50 Where You Expect The Finest And Get It \ S FAMOUS SAUD BAR DAILY 3 p.m.-9 pm. ONLY 1 JS Our Uiual Complete & ^xtensive Menu Also :fir '82 DIESEL Sale 37' VOGUE MOTOR HOME Come in & see the most beautiful motor home in the United Slates!! 1179 LIST PRICE $189,693 MAKE US AN OFFER WE CAN7 REFUSE! ALLEGRO 35' Catepillar pusher diesel on OshKosh chassis, really loaded with equipment. #1164 LIST PRICE $107,366 SALE PRICE 89,995 ALLEfiR0 2r 6 2 Diesel, completely equipped, power plant, roof air, arctic pack. stereo, cruise control, tilt wtieel, lust too many items to mention 1172 UST PRICE $39,995 SAUE PRICE '29,995 H you purchase sn RV before coming to Sunland RV, we txXh have lost money! SUNLAND RV CENTER 456-8046 "j;s; o?^K^ 3333 E. Fremont ture, through her psychological studies, not only improves her ability to handle the requirements of her profession, but keeps her from bogging down in the physical sense. From here, Nancy's next stop is Cincinnati, where both opera house audiences and radio listeners will hear her vocal beauty in a performance of Puccini's II Tabarro, reminiscent of her triumphant debut in the starring role of ^orgetta some years ago. Nancy was born and raised on a farm near Rockton, Illinois, and won a scholarship to study voice at Indiana University. Later, she won first place in the Metropolitan Opera National Auditions. Now an established international opera star, she moved to Boulder City about three years ago to avail herself of Vernon Howard classes. She has been a devoted student of his books and principles for more than ten years now. •*••••••••••••••••••••• i CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS J 27 WATER ST. I Free Food & flefreshments M 6-8 PM IHURS MAY 20th M BRING THE FAMILY t D. JIM JENSEN { COINTY COMMISSIONER "A" t, (•••••••••••••••••••••••* HfSMmde. ^ "B'HuaBw' T Hwy. 93 iNext to Hoover Dam Phone 2S3-5000 Congratulations To Boulder City & Henderson Graduating Class of '82 from Staff b Management ofthe OOLO STRIKE INN & C ASINO

PAGE 22

Page 22 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday, May 20.1982 Thursday, May 20, 1982 "Scanditjavia". a colorful and spectacular fljm tour of. Scandinavia's captivating vistas of Denmark. Norway and Sweden is to be presented Saturday, May 22nd at 2:00 Ejn., in the County ibrary auditorium (1401 East Flamingo Road). .."Denmark"and the city of Copenhagen, country and its historic dty rich in traditional lore of its colorful beauty. The cobbled Laxatt Acts to Control Courts Nevada Senator Paul Laxalt, prompted by a controversial court decision involving the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge near Elko, Nevada, has introduced a bill th,at would require courts to transfer all lawsuits against the government to the area most affected by the case. In 1978, the DefenA ders of Wildlife sued the Interior Department because Interior allowed recreational boating on Ruby Lake. The District Court in Washington, .D.C., heard the case and decided in favor of the environmental group -ordering a ban on boating at Ruby Lake. Under the Laxalt bill, the lawsuit would have automatically been transferred to the District Court in Nevada. "In suits against the Federal Government, such as in the Ruby Lake case, we have seen important lawsuits being tried in Washington only because the parties were the Federal Government and a public interest law firm located here," Laxalt said. Supporters of the legislation contend that it will justifiably return venue to ftie local District Courts and provide the judges in these courts the opportunity to make decisions ifi lawsuits that affect their jurisdictions. In addition, they pouvt^out^he dtffrcTrity in meeting the financial burden of traveling to the nation's capital to present a case. Laxalt said, "Court proceedings should be held in the community which has the most at stake in the litigation, which will be most affected by the outcome of the litigation. This bill makes the impact of the litigation a prime consideration in determining where a lawsuit against the Federal Government should be heard." Centel Employees Give Blood Willing employees at Central TelephoneNevada rolled up their sleeves and gave a company record 470 units of blood at the spring mobile drive conducted by Nevada Blood Service. The total represented 19 percent of the Centel work force and a 62-unit increase over the last spring drive. Last fall 15 percent of the employees participated. "Centel employees should be proud," said ^ob Beville, personnel-public relations manager "They continue to excel in this vital contribution to the persons served by Nevada Blood Service." NatiOMvide about three percent of the • citizens donate all the blood, according to .Jievada Blood Senice. Him Tour of Scandinavia to ba Presented at County Library streets, the halftimbered houses, the quaint shops, the bustling trade centers of this citv and other towns and villages of the countryside, and the cultural arts and crafts of the Danish people ate all depicted m this film. The panoramic beauty of lush, green farmlands dotted with picturesque fium dwellings and. structures with so much to be seen in this verdant land all of which are vividly portrayed in this fUm of a great nation and its people. "Norway" and the city of Olso at the head of the magnificent Qord with. Its unmatched charm of beauty and an array of fine shops and stores that invite the buyer of its wares is only a part of this, film that takes the viewer into the cojorful countryside with its picturesque towns and villages. The great city of Bergen rich in the lore of this historic land of wondrous and indescribable beauty of the Qordland. from the gentle blue-green arms to the southern Qord, to the stormscarred cliffs of the North Cape, to the rugged mountains with snow-capped peaks that are in sharp contrast with the lush meadowltnds below; all of this abounds in the land Q(. the legendary Vikings are portrayed in this fUm. .."Sweden'.' and the city of Stockholm with it 14 islands., lakes, parks and cobbled streets, quaint shops and stores in the miost of modem buUding structures, of which offers the buyer of the traditional Swedish handiwork of the arts and crafts of these talented and skilled people are shown in this film. The cuhural arts of this great nation is only one of its most treasured values are noted in this film. The countryside of towns and viUages^in a setting of indescribable beauty exemplifies the rich tradit on of this, nation's co orfiil history. Sweden and its citjf of Stockholm despite its socalled "Modern Touch." still preserves, its colorful and historic way of life. This film program presented by the Socieiy of. Mining Engineering oJ A.I.M.E. as.a public service that it mav be of informative and educational interest to the .student and public. Robert Geer, member-representative of A.M.I.E. is in charge of the pro< gram. Free admission. •• come early •• limited seating. This Was Nevada Dayton's Code Of Justice Henderson Home News and Boulder City Nevs Page 23 IPO'S Of NewBBdiigg d • By Phillip I. Earl The lynching of "Lucky Bill" Thorrington in 1858, chronicled in these columns last week, took place at a time of political <-haos in the western section of the Utah Territory, but the achievement of territorial status by the citizens of this end of the Great Basin did not put an end to lynch law. The lynching ofJames Linn in-Dayton in August of 1864 is a case in point. PricesAtAfbertsons BLADE CUT CHUCK STEAK AI^ERTSONS, SUPREME I BEEF WHOLE TOP SIRLOIN WESSON OIL SCENE OF LYNCHING—Quiet, serene Dayton, the scene of the lynching of James Linn in August of 1864. FRESH SWEET CORN •ta \. Little is known of Linn's backgrond other than e fact that he had previously been accused of urder in LaPorte, California, hut had left the ate before the chajcge could be settled one way or another. He had variously worked as a miner and a J'Sjnill hand in Nevada and was known to be danger' • • ^ ous when he was drinking. In early August of 1864, the Union Party happened to be holding its nominating convention in Dayton. Delegates strolled around town between sessions, slaked their thirst in the saloons lining the main street and looked forward to another evening in the company of the girls who worked at John Doyle's dancehall. On Friday, August 5, Doyle opened his establishment in the early afternoon. Within hours, the hall was packed with would-be politicians, miners and mill men. Among them was Linn. The nature of the dispute between Doyle and Linn is not known, but the two had apparently argued earlier in the week and Linn returned to continue the discussion. On the evening in question, the argument moved to the street and flared into a fight. The two men had just squared off as a crowd ftegan to gather, but Linn suddenly pulled a heavy bowie knife and plunged it into Doyle's chest. As Doyle lay mortally wounded in the street. Linn took to his heels, running through the dancehall and up the.canyon in the direction of the Darney Mill. Constable George W. Shaw and several men ran him down moments later and he was taken to the local jail. An examination before the Justice of the Peace was scheduled for the next day and Linn secured an attorney, L. R, Harrison. The excitement of the previous night's goings-on had died down by the next morning and lawmen expected no reprisals against Linn since Doyle had been a rather disretable, unpopul ar character arou nd town Linn placed the rope around his neck. Without further ceremony, they kicked the step stool from beneath his feet and left him to strangle. The body had ceased to twitch within twenty minutes and was cut down when all signs of life had expired. A few minutes later, the lifeless corpse was returned to the cell and those who did the deed melted into the inky darkness. The sheriff was informed of the lynching withm the hour, but waited until daylight to come over to the jail. As word of the lynching spread, there were rumors of planned reprisals against certain other hard characters. Governor James W. Nye was notified in his Carson City office and he in turn wired Fort Churchill for a troop of cavalry. The men arrived at 2 p.m. and set up headquarters in the courthouse and Nye himself got in three hours later. Finding that peace and quiet reigned, he stepped to the balcony of the Odeon Hall and read a prepared speech on the evils of citizens carrying out the law themselves. The people of Dayton were meanwhile going about their peaceftil Sunday pursuits. A few stopped to listen, but a crowd never gathered. Somewhat embarrassed, Nye cut his peroration short, called for his carriage and was soon on his way back to Carson City. The cavalrymen had meanwhile gathered their gear and departed also, secure in the knowledge that the people of Dayton had taken care of matters according to their own code of justice. MEAT-DELI 7-BONE ROAST--'" ""-. 129 SPARERIBS ss?^'SK^' ^ 159 BEEF RIBS • ^"" .P O-BONE ROAST """^.F GROUND BEEF'^'""'^^*"''^i l"' TURKEYHAM"" :T .P CORNED B EEF =r ^1^ • • IICCIMC ENGLISH. ALBERTSONS O S f DOG FOOD "-^ • r-",.o. 4*1 PAPER T0WELS"-^.-2,o.l PAPER TOWELS • ^ .79 TATORTOTS?^„o?l DR. PEPPER 5 • • 5^199 WINES & LIQUOR FRESH PRODUCE KAmCHATKA^*" "^"i^ 6" ONIONS W:^. .. 4il JIM BEAM """"•-" „. • O'" CUCUMBERS F 3il SEAGRAMS GIN *" ,1. • B"" POTATOES r^^'— ^ 3il JOHANNE'S EGBERTS';;;.. 3" VARIETY SPECIALS GROCERY-FROZEN TUMBLERS CRICKET TEXAS, PLASDC ASSOflTCOCOiORS 34-OZ UOHTERS All an GENERIC SAVINGS CAT FOOD r"^ .„3il GREEN BEANS""-^^iSil ORANGES -r „^2.ll 5-OZ. CRISCO SHORTEMNO 219 4a-oz. MOST STOdtS OPEN 7 AM 'TIL MIDNIGHT SOMt TOISO*(N14H0UI*t PRICES EFFECTIVE WEDNESDAY, MAY 19 THRU TUESDAY, MAY 2S, 1962. EXCEPT OCEANSIOE Albertsons' AVAILABlUn fich ot me jovertised Items 15 'muirrt to Bt rejOity iviiiit>l( tor sale at oi twiow iiw advf rtised pnce in each *ltirf;on 5 store eicept as speciiicaity notei) m tins ao RAJN CHECK Wt stnve to nave on hand sufttcient sioch ol advertised merchandise K lor any rea son we are out ol slock a RAIN CHECK orii be issued enabling jou to buy ttw ilem al me advertised price as soon as il becomes avtiiieie FAaraC SOFTENER 40 OfF LABEL CLEANSER POWDER • OfF LABEL 21-02. SnC & SPAN pleaded self-defense and Justice R.D. Ward released him on $10,000 bail. When the citizens of Dayton heard of this, they held a meeting and sent a delegation to call upon the judge and demand that Linn be returned to jail. Ward then revoked the bond a"nd Linn was soon rounded up and placed back in his cell, but there was a darker conspiracy afoot. Among those citizens who had met to protest Judge Ward's decision to admit Linn to bail were a number of men who wanted to forego the whole process and take care of the man in a more summary fashion. That evening, they secured lumber, nails and rope and constructed a rough gallows. After concealing it behind a church, they went their respective ways agreeing to reconvene at 3 a.m. Rumors that Linn would soon meet his end made the rounds in the saloons that evening and a story circulatedto the effect that he had friends in Gold Hill and Virginia City who were planning to aid him in escaping. The sheriff thus called in all his deputies and put on several extra guards to surround the jail. The evening passed peacefully enough, however, and most of the guards went home at midnight. Some three hours later, a number of men met at the appointed spot near the church and set up their gallows. Pulling handkerThe first fan was made in 1886 by Schuyler S. Wheeler who placed a propeller on the end of a shaft which he turned with an electric motor. MOVE UP TO^BCCELLENCE ADULT LIVING 2 Bedroom-l'^ or 2 Baths All built-in appliance including washer and dryer, swimming pool, lush landscaping. BOULDER HILLS The Holicla^ Casino Presents 'v-"':> i^A^^^^^^a^i^irtiM AU Boards Just 5< EACH! ^ (Two bodrds minimum) W Agcnl* collect each game. Bckets paased oul to players / on Hnt game of each peiiod of X)ld Fashion Nickel Bingo foe FREE $50.00 COVERALL ...>,end of Ntckk Bingo' NEW EXPANDED HOURS Open Daily 9:00 AM-5:00 AM! HOLIDAY CASINO Wc re Pioud lo be Called. TME WORLD S FRIENDLIEST BINGO P/KRLOR. CENTER STRIP BETWEEN THE SANDS AND FLAMKIOO Nevada Small Business Person Of Year chiefs over their faces, they pulled their revolvers and marched to the jail in a body. Surprising the guards, most of whom had been asleep, they entered the jail, demanded the keys to the cells and took Linn out. He began to shout and call for helpt but was quieted by a clod of dirt shoved in his mouth. As the remainder of the lynchers held the guards prisoner, the others wrestled Linn down the street, hauled him up on the gallows and Donald M. Gadsby, President of Renobased Precision Rolled Products, Inc., has been named the Nevada Small Business Person of the Year by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In announcing the award, SBA District Director Jerry W. Stephens said, "Mr. Gadsby is an entreprenuer in the truest sense. He personifies the essence of the award. Although successful while working for others, he decided to start his own business. With an idea and the perseverance to make it a reality, Mr. Gadsby founded Precision Rolled Products, Inc., a major manufacturer of speciality metal products." Known for its innovation and craftsmanship. Precision Rolled Products, Inc. is building for^he future. While there are always risks inherent in business, with his managerial and technical skills as keys to success, Mr. Gadsby and his company are up to the challenge. The company was established in 1974 and initially achieved sales of $52,111 on the efforts of Don and his four teenage sons. In 1981, the company had nearly 150 employees and $21,000,000 sales. Born in 1933 in Rouseville, Pennsylvania, Don Gadsby graduated from Youngstown College with a Bacheloiof Science in Metallurgical Engineering in 1955, and spent eighteen years in the steel industry gaining practical management experience in both metallurgy and sales. At present he resides in Reno, Nevada. An award presentation is scheduled for the May 20, 1982 Greater Reno-Sparks Chamber of Commerce breakfast meeting in Reno. Mr. Stephens stated, "Fred Davis of the Greater RenoSparks Chamber of accommodate the SBA forded to honor this Commerce has araward. I appreciate the importaffTReTio small ranged the agenda to opportunity he has afbusiness. WEIGHT WATCHERS WORKS FOR CAROL ALBERICI. (Lost 73lbs) "...The whole concept of Weight Watchers is fantastic. I like the newest food plans I like the extras-the wine and things like that. It really works. Now I go into a store and there is so much in my sue and ei'erythtng looks good. I just love the new me'" FOR '4 LESS. Now, Weight Watrhers can work for you-for '4 less. Just clip this coupon, bring it to class, and we'll take 'I off >our first meefing and registration fee. But hurry. This offer ends May 29, 1982. WEIGHT WATCHERS $400 DISCOUNT ON RCGlSTBATiON AND FISI MffTING HI OFFER ENDS MAY 29, IN2 Of^er voJid only Oi O diiCOunt and moy not be comb'ned with any other d'scouot or jpet'ol fo'e Otter volid m port.cipoting oreoi only FOR '12 LESS. Here's another way Weight Watchers < an ivork'fo .save vou nionev. Join now. and we'll give vou a valuable coupon book with tickets that are worth real dollar.'^. Present vour coupon book and we'll lake $1 off vour weeklv meeting fees ea< h time vou come to class through Sept. 4. VW2. (As long as you keep vour membership current). You'll save d total of $12 and learn how to lose weight without giving up the foods you love. WEIGHT WATCHERS The most successful weight loss program in the world. For a class near you call: 736-6683 R*va Schwartz Araa Diractor al s being lealned every day Even as we re growing we're looking ahead lo meet the needs ol our Green Valley family Broi^tDUfe by Experts. Am#fcan Nevada Corp. devetoper o Green Valley, knows it's not enough to have a plan We ve found experts to D'lng every face! of t*^e plan (0 lit Green Valley oMers the widest variety ol homes available m Ctark County There are homes to suit every future Our town will prosper because we ve brought together natior^ally recognized, locally based maste' buiiderr-CoMins Brother! US Home. Pardee and Metropolitan Builders, who even m the toughest economtc times, make it possible for thousands of people to realize their dream of home ownership They re Du'iding quality homes whose value can be realized today and m years to corhe Look at All \AfeAiE. Homes atone do not make a town We're working daily to provide the services a to*" r>eds The new school ar^d park are a sign oi a strong future Jobs created by the new industry here mean working close to horr^e tor many pt ouf citi/ens Soon Green Vaiiey wiii boast a new Shopping center And the business park will bring more services to Green Valley It takes time to put the right pieces together and we mvile you to be a part ot the success were Bcheving /vVoictoGome Hometa Green Valley, all its homes neign bors. businesses services and laciiities IS a town growing according to plan Visil tr>e many protects now selling You ii tind all hinds ot ways to begm yoor new hie Visit Green Valley and see YOUR plan come lo n'e Moyv Selling at Green Vaiey. Presented by Pardee Construction Company ol Nevada. Division of Weyerhaeuser ToOer Home-3 4 bdoom lamily homes. aHo'dably p"ced Irom 177 000 lo S83 OOn Sales oii.ce 458 liW Presented by US Home: G'een Valley Village 1 i story 3 4 bedroom lamily homes Distinctive homes priced Irom $ lOB 000 10 SI21 500 Sales o'rice 458 63o "Presented by Collins Brointrt: Valley OaKs • 3 4 bedroom semi-custom homes Elegant living from S199.80C Sales oliice 456 ibb^ Royal Oahs Family homes from s:i900 S-ilPS o'l.ce 456 1663 Presented by Metropolitan Development Corporation: Green valley Parn r& J story. 3, 4 4 5 bedroom homes Gracious living from $86,950 to S1134O0 Sales office 456 7830 Presented by Metropolitan Development Corporation and American Nevada Corporation: Green valley Higniaoas i i ; story. 2 4 3 t>edroom luKury townhomes ConlempQiary iivmc; in a recreational atmosphere priced from $89950 IOE1I3950 Sales office 466-4448 Presented by American Nevada Corporation: Ouail Ridge Estates i acre or larger custom homesites with Guard Gale Security ana eelusive Tennis Club facilities A desert masterpiece onced from £65.000" Saies oHice 456 496t GU GREEN [ ^', VALLEY ATDWVN WITH A PLAN. • • 1 •-. '•1 ^ "li I 1 .-s..i \t^mj .7

PAGE 23

Page 22 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday, May 20.1982 Thursday, May 20, 1982 "Scanditjavia". a colorful and spectacular fljm tour of. Scandinavia's captivating vistas of Denmark. Norway and Sweden is to be presented Saturday, May 22nd at 2:00 Ejn., in the County ibrary auditorium (1401 East Flamingo Road). .."Denmark"and the city of Copenhagen, country and its historic dty rich in traditional lore of its colorful beauty. The cobbled Laxatt Acts to Control Courts Nevada Senator Paul Laxalt, prompted by a controversial court decision involving the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge near Elko, Nevada, has introduced a bill th,at would require courts to transfer all lawsuits against the government to the area most affected by the case. In 1978, the DefenA ders of Wildlife sued the Interior Department because Interior allowed recreational boating on Ruby Lake. The District Court in Washington, .D.C., heard the case and decided in favor of the environmental group -ordering a ban on boating at Ruby Lake. Under the Laxalt bill, the lawsuit would have automatically been transferred to the District Court in Nevada. "In suits against the Federal Government, such as in the Ruby Lake case, we have seen important lawsuits being tried in Washington only because the parties were the Federal Government and a public interest law firm located here," Laxalt said. Supporters of the legislation contend that it will justifiably return venue to ftie local District Courts and provide the judges in these courts the opportunity to make decisions ifi lawsuits that affect their jurisdictions. In addition, they pouvt^out^he dtffrcTrity in meeting the financial burden of traveling to the nation's capital to present a case. Laxalt said, "Court proceedings should be held in the community which has the most at stake in the litigation, which will be most affected by the outcome of the litigation. This bill makes the impact of the litigation a prime consideration in determining where a lawsuit against the Federal Government should be heard." Centel Employees Give Blood Willing employees at Central TelephoneNevada rolled up their sleeves and gave a company record 470 units of blood at the spring mobile drive conducted by Nevada Blood Service. The total represented 19 percent of the Centel work force and a 62-unit increase over the last spring drive. Last fall 15 percent of the employees participated. "Centel employees should be proud," said ^ob Beville, personnel-public relations manager "They continue to excel in this vital contribution to the persons served by Nevada Blood Service." NatiOMvide about three percent of the • citizens donate all the blood, according to .Jievada Blood Senice. Him Tour of Scandinavia to ba Presented at County Library streets, the halftimbered houses, the quaint shops, the bustling trade centers of this citv and other towns and villages of the countryside, and the cultural arts and crafts of the Danish people ate all depicted m this film. The panoramic beauty of lush, green farmlands dotted with picturesque fium dwellings and. structures with so much to be seen in this verdant land all of which are vividly portrayed in this fUm of a great nation and its people. "Norway" and the city of Olso at the head of the magnificent Qord with. Its unmatched charm of beauty and an array of fine shops and stores that invite the buyer of its wares is only a part of this, film that takes the viewer into the cojorful countryside with its picturesque towns and villages. The great city of Bergen rich in the lore of this historic land of wondrous and indescribable beauty of the Qordland. from the gentle blue-green arms to the southern Qord, to the stormscarred cliffs of the North Cape, to the rugged mountains with snow-capped peaks that are in sharp contrast with the lush meadowltnds below; all of this abounds in the land Q(. the legendary Vikings are portrayed in this fUm. .."Sweden'.' and the city of Stockholm with it 14 islands., lakes, parks and cobbled streets, quaint shops and stores in the miost of modem buUding structures, of which offers the buyer of the traditional Swedish handiwork of the arts and crafts of these talented and skilled people are shown in this film. The cuhural arts of this great nation is only one of its most treasured values are noted in this film. The countryside of towns and viUages^in a setting of indescribable beauty exemplifies the rich tradit on of this, nation's co orfiil history. Sweden and its citjf of Stockholm despite its socalled "Modern Touch." still preserves, its colorful and historic way of life. This film program presented by the Socieiy of. Mining Engineering oJ A.I.M.E. as.a public service that it mav be of informative and educational interest to the .student and public. Robert Geer, member-representative of A.M.I.E. is in charge of the pro< gram. Free admission. •• come early •• limited seating. This Was Nevada Dayton's Code Of Justice Henderson Home News and Boulder City Nevs Page 23 IPO'S Of NewBBdiigg d • By Phillip I. Earl The lynching of "Lucky Bill" Thorrington in 1858, chronicled in these columns last week, took place at a time of political <-haos in the western section of the Utah Territory, but the achievement of territorial status by the citizens of this end of the Great Basin did not put an end to lynch law. The lynching ofJames Linn in-Dayton in August of 1864 is a case in point. PricesAtAfbertsons BLADE CUT CHUCK STEAK AI^ERTSONS, SUPREME I BEEF WHOLE TOP SIRLOIN WESSON OIL SCENE OF LYNCHING—Quiet, serene Dayton, the scene of the lynching of James Linn in August of 1864. FRESH SWEET CORN •ta \. Little is known of Linn's backgrond other than e fact that he had previously been accused of urder in LaPorte, California, hut had left the ate before the chajcge could be settled one way or another. He had variously worked as a miner and a J'Sjnill hand in Nevada and was known to be danger' • • ^ ous when he was drinking. In early August of 1864, the Union Party happened to be holding its nominating convention in Dayton. Delegates strolled around town between sessions, slaked their thirst in the saloons lining the main street and looked forward to another evening in the company of the girls who worked at John Doyle's dancehall. On Friday, August 5, Doyle opened his establishment in the early afternoon. Within hours, the hall was packed with would-be politicians, miners and mill men. Among them was Linn. The nature of the dispute between Doyle and Linn is not known, but the two had apparently argued earlier in the week and Linn returned to continue the discussion. On the evening in question, the argument moved to the street and flared into a fight. The two men had just squared off as a crowd ftegan to gather, but Linn suddenly pulled a heavy bowie knife and plunged it into Doyle's chest. As Doyle lay mortally wounded in the street. Linn took to his heels, running through the dancehall and up the.canyon in the direction of the Darney Mill. Constable George W. Shaw and several men ran him down moments later and he was taken to the local jail. An examination before the Justice of the Peace was scheduled for the next day and Linn secured an attorney, L. R, Harrison. The excitement of the previous night's goings-on had died down by the next morning and lawmen expected no reprisals against Linn since Doyle had been a rather disretable, unpopul ar character arou nd town Linn placed the rope around his neck. Without further ceremony, they kicked the step stool from beneath his feet and left him to strangle. The body had ceased to twitch within twenty minutes and was cut down when all signs of life had expired. A few minutes later, the lifeless corpse was returned to the cell and those who did the deed melted into the inky darkness. The sheriff was informed of the lynching withm the hour, but waited until daylight to come over to the jail. As word of the lynching spread, there were rumors of planned reprisals against certain other hard characters. Governor James W. Nye was notified in his Carson City office and he in turn wired Fort Churchill for a troop of cavalry. The men arrived at 2 p.m. and set up headquarters in the courthouse and Nye himself got in three hours later. Finding that peace and quiet reigned, he stepped to the balcony of the Odeon Hall and read a prepared speech on the evils of citizens carrying out the law themselves. The people of Dayton were meanwhile going about their peaceftil Sunday pursuits. A few stopped to listen, but a crowd never gathered. Somewhat embarrassed, Nye cut his peroration short, called for his carriage and was soon on his way back to Carson City. The cavalrymen had meanwhile gathered their gear and departed also, secure in the knowledge that the people of Dayton had taken care of matters according to their own code of justice. MEAT-DELI 7-BONE ROAST--'" ""-. 129 SPARERIBS ss?^'SK^' ^ 159 BEEF RIBS • ^"" .P O-BONE ROAST """^.F GROUND BEEF'^'""'^^*"''^i l"' TURKEYHAM"" :T .P CORNED B EEF =r ^1^ • • IICCIMC ENGLISH. ALBERTSONS O S f DOG FOOD "-^ • r-",.o. 4*1 PAPER T0WELS"-^.-2,o.l PAPER TOWELS • ^ .79 TATORTOTS?^„o?l DR. PEPPER 5 • • 5^199 WINES & LIQUOR FRESH PRODUCE KAmCHATKA^*" "^"i^ 6" ONIONS W:^. .. 4il JIM BEAM """"•-" „. • O'" CUCUMBERS F 3il SEAGRAMS GIN *" ,1. • B"" POTATOES r^^'— ^ 3il JOHANNE'S EGBERTS';;;.. 3" VARIETY SPECIALS GROCERY-FROZEN TUMBLERS CRICKET TEXAS, PLASDC ASSOflTCOCOiORS 34-OZ UOHTERS All an GENERIC SAVINGS CAT FOOD r"^ .„3il GREEN BEANS""-^^iSil ORANGES -r „^2.ll 5-OZ. CRISCO SHORTEMNO 219 4a-oz. MOST STOdtS OPEN 7 AM 'TIL MIDNIGHT SOMt TOISO*(N14H0UI*t PRICES EFFECTIVE WEDNESDAY, MAY 19 THRU TUESDAY, MAY 2S, 1962. EXCEPT OCEANSIOE Albertsons' AVAILABlUn fich ot me jovertised Items 15 'muirrt to Bt rejOity iviiiit>l( tor sale at oi twiow iiw advf rtised pnce in each *ltirf;on 5 store eicept as speciiicaity notei) m tins ao RAJN CHECK Wt stnve to nave on hand sufttcient sioch ol advertised merchandise K lor any rea son we are out ol slock a RAIN CHECK orii be issued enabling jou to buy ttw ilem al me advertised price as soon as il becomes avtiiieie FAaraC SOFTENER 40 OfF LABEL CLEANSER POWDER • OfF LABEL 21-02. SnC & SPAN pleaded self-defense and Justice R.D. Ward released him on $10,000 bail. When the citizens of Dayton heard of this, they held a meeting and sent a delegation to call upon the judge and demand that Linn be returned to jail. Ward then revoked the bond a"nd Linn was soon rounded up and placed back in his cell, but there was a darker conspiracy afoot. Among those citizens who had met to protest Judge Ward's decision to admit Linn to bail were a number of men who wanted to forego the whole process and take care of the man in a more summary fashion. That evening, they secured lumber, nails and rope and constructed a rough gallows. After concealing it behind a church, they went their respective ways agreeing to reconvene at 3 a.m. Rumors that Linn would soon meet his end made the rounds in the saloons that evening and a story circulatedto the effect that he had friends in Gold Hill and Virginia City who were planning to aid him in escaping. The sheriff thus called in all his deputies and put on several extra guards to surround the jail. The evening passed peacefully enough, however, and most of the guards went home at midnight. Some three hours later, a number of men met at the appointed spot near the church and set up their gallows. Pulling handkerThe first fan was made in 1886 by Schuyler S. Wheeler who placed a propeller on the end of a shaft which he turned with an electric motor. MOVE UP TO^BCCELLENCE ADULT LIVING 2 Bedroom-l'^ or 2 Baths All built-in appliance including washer and dryer, swimming pool, lush landscaping. BOULDER HILLS The Holicla^ Casino Presents 'v-"':> i^A^^^^^^a^i^irtiM AU Boards Just 5< EACH! ^ (Two bodrds minimum) W Agcnl* collect each game. Bckets paased oul to players / on Hnt game of each peiiod of X)ld Fashion Nickel Bingo foe FREE $50.00 COVERALL ...>,end of Ntckk Bingo' NEW EXPANDED HOURS Open Daily 9:00 AM-5:00 AM! HOLIDAY CASINO Wc re Pioud lo be Called. TME WORLD S FRIENDLIEST BINGO P/KRLOR. CENTER STRIP BETWEEN THE SANDS AND FLAMKIOO Nevada Small Business Person Of Year chiefs over their faces, they pulled their revolvers and marched to the jail in a body. Surprising the guards, most of whom had been asleep, they entered the jail, demanded the keys to the cells and took Linn out. He began to shout and call for helpt but was quieted by a clod of dirt shoved in his mouth. As the remainder of the lynchers held the guards prisoner, the others wrestled Linn down the street, hauled him up on the gallows and Donald M. Gadsby, President of Renobased Precision Rolled Products, Inc., has been named the Nevada Small Business Person of the Year by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). In announcing the award, SBA District Director Jerry W. Stephens said, "Mr. Gadsby is an entreprenuer in the truest sense. He personifies the essence of the award. Although successful while working for others, he decided to start his own business. With an idea and the perseverance to make it a reality, Mr. Gadsby founded Precision Rolled Products, Inc., a major manufacturer of speciality metal products." Known for its innovation and craftsmanship. Precision Rolled Products, Inc. is building for^he future. While there are always risks inherent in business, with his managerial and technical skills as keys to success, Mr. Gadsby and his company are up to the challenge. The company was established in 1974 and initially achieved sales of $52,111 on the efforts of Don and his four teenage sons. In 1981, the company had nearly 150 employees and $21,000,000 sales. Born in 1933 in Rouseville, Pennsylvania, Don Gadsby graduated from Youngstown College with a Bacheloiof Science in Metallurgical Engineering in 1955, and spent eighteen years in the steel industry gaining practical management experience in both metallurgy and sales. At present he resides in Reno, Nevada. An award presentation is scheduled for the May 20, 1982 Greater Reno-Sparks Chamber of Commerce breakfast meeting in Reno. Mr. Stephens stated, "Fred Davis of the Greater RenoSparks Chamber of accommodate the SBA forded to honor this Commerce has araward. I appreciate the importaffTReTio small ranged the agenda to opportunity he has afbusiness. WEIGHT WATCHERS WORKS FOR CAROL ALBERICI. (Lost 73lbs) "...The whole concept of Weight Watchers is fantastic. I like the newest food plans I like the extras-the wine and things like that. It really works. Now I go into a store and there is so much in my sue and ei'erythtng looks good. I just love the new me'" FOR '4 LESS. Now, Weight Watrhers can work for you-for '4 less. Just clip this coupon, bring it to class, and we'll take 'I off >our first meefing and registration fee. But hurry. This offer ends May 29, 1982. WEIGHT WATCHERS $400 DISCOUNT ON RCGlSTBATiON AND FISI MffTING HI OFFER ENDS MAY 29, IN2 Of^er voJid only Oi O diiCOunt and moy not be comb'ned with any other d'scouot or jpet'ol fo'e Otter volid m port.cipoting oreoi only FOR '12 LESS. Here's another way Weight Watchers < an ivork'fo .save vou nionev. Join now. and we'll give vou a valuable coupon book with tickets that are worth real dollar.'^. Present vour coupon book and we'll lake $1 off vour weeklv meeting fees ea< h time vou come to class through Sept. 4. VW2. (As long as you keep vour membership current). You'll save d total of $12 and learn how to lose weight without giving up the foods you love. WEIGHT WATCHERS The most successful weight loss program in the world. For a class near you call: 736-6683 R*va Schwartz Araa Diractor al s being lealned every day Even as we re growing we're looking ahead lo meet the needs ol our Green Valley family Broi^tDUfe by Experts. Am#fcan Nevada Corp. devetoper o Green Valley, knows it's not enough to have a plan We ve found experts to D'lng every face! of t*^e plan (0 lit Green Valley oMers the widest variety ol homes available m Ctark County There are homes to suit every future Our town will prosper because we ve brought together natior^ally recognized, locally based maste' buiiderr-CoMins Brother! US Home. Pardee and Metropolitan Builders, who even m the toughest economtc times, make it possible for thousands of people to realize their dream of home ownership They re Du'iding quality homes whose value can be realized today and m years to corhe Look at All \AfeAiE. Homes atone do not make a town We're working daily to provide the services a to*" r>eds The new school ar^d park are a sign oi a strong future Jobs created by the new industry here mean working close to horr^e tor many pt ouf citi/ens Soon Green Vaiiey wiii boast a new Shopping center And the business park will bring more services to Green Valley It takes time to put the right pieces together and we mvile you to be a part ot the success were Bcheving /vVoictoGome Hometa Green Valley, all its homes neign bors. businesses services and laciiities IS a town growing according to plan Visil tr>e many protects now selling You ii tind all hinds ot ways to begm yoor new hie Visit Green Valley and see YOUR plan come lo n'e Moyv Selling at Green Vaiey. Presented by Pardee Construction Company ol Nevada. Division of Weyerhaeuser ToOer Home-3 4 bdoom lamily homes. aHo'dably p"ced Irom 177 000 lo S83 OOn Sales oii.ce 458 liW Presented by US Home: G'een Valley Village 1 i story 3 4 bedroom lamily homes Distinctive homes priced Irom $ lOB 000 10 SI21 500 Sales o'rice 458 63o "Presented by Collins Brointrt: Valley OaKs • 3 4 bedroom semi-custom homes Elegant living from S199.80C Sales oliice 456 ibb^ Royal Oahs Family homes from s:i900 S-ilPS o'l.ce 456 1663 Presented by Metropolitan Development Corporation: Green valley Parn r& J story. 3, 4 4 5 bedroom homes Gracious living from $86,950 to S1134O0 Sales office 456 7830 Presented by Metropolitan Development Corporation and American Nevada Corporation: Green valley Higniaoas i i ; story. 2 4 3 t>edroom luKury townhomes ConlempQiary iivmc; in a recreational atmosphere priced from $89950 IOE1I3950 Sales office 466-4448 Presented by American Nevada Corporation: Ouail Ridge Estates i acre or larger custom homesites with Guard Gale Security ana eelusive Tennis Club facilities A desert masterpiece onced from £65.000" Saies oHice 456 496t GU GREEN [ ^', VALLEY ATDWVN WITH A PLAN. • • 1 •-. '•1 ^ "li I 1 .-s..i \t^mj .7

PAGE 24

wmmi wm T Page 24 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News UNLV Commencement Awards Thursday, May 20,1982. tjuurtiu^y, tuay lit, itfo^ Steak TH Taters' Good For Bg Eaters UNLV will graduate 1,178 students May 23 at 2:30 p.m. in the Las Vegas Convention Center Rotunda in a ceremony that will include presentation of honorary degrees and Distinguished Nevadan Awards to a group of S rominent Southern evadans selected by l^e Board of Regents. : Marjorie Barrick, creator of the Barric Endowment Fund at UNLV, will be honored as a Distinguished Nevadan Barrick and her late husband. Edward, came to Las Vegas in 1950 from Omaha. She earned a business education degree from Creighton University and has enrolled in courses at UNLV for many years. In 1979, the Barncks, along with business associates from Omaha, donated a piece of downtown property now valued at more than a quarter of a million dollars to the UNLV College of Business and Economics. The following year, Mrs. Barrick presented UNLV a gift of more than $1 million to endow a lecture series, two fellpwships, a faculty development fund and a research fund. Eileen B. Brookman, a former member of the Nevada Assembly, will also receive the Distinguished Nevadan Award Irwin A Molasky, chairman of UNLV's FoundationFund Board, will receive the Distinguished Nevadan Award for his community service and contributions to the growth of Las Vegas. Former Nevada Gov. Mike O'Callaghan cited Molasky for his exemplary service to the state in economic and social areas, and the Prime Minister of Israel has acknowledged his as' sistance in that nation's economic develop,Tnent. : Molasky is a.Century •Club Lifetime Member :of the Boulder Dam '.Area Boy Scouts of 'America, and a regent • of the Society of Fellows, Anti Defamation League, of which he served as Nevada chairman. Lucile Spire Bruner, a local artist and • teacher who recently .won the Governor's : Arts Award, will perceive an honorary doc' .'torate in humane letJters. \ A muralist Whose •work includes New ;Deal-era paintings in -Oklahoma, Bruner's artworks are included in several public collections, including those held by the Oklahoma Historical Society; the Amarillo Public Library in Amarillo, Texas; the Las Vegas Art Museum; Clark County Public Library; James Dickinson Lib.raryatUNLV; and in five Las Vegas banks. Helene FoUmer, member of the Allied Arts Council and the Accountants Invite L Visitors Thejnembcrs of the American JSociety of Women Accountants, Las Vgas Chapter #10S^ invite students of accounting and persons working in the accounting profession to a "Getting To Know Us" gathering at the "Tiojne of Sharon McNair. CPA. 1705 : Eurnard Drive, Las Vegas, Sunday, June 6th from 2;00 to 4i00 vp.ni. For information •call MarUyn Dille at !38M646 or Sharon at J46.0888. All interest: ed persons are 'Welcome. BATS ABOUND There are more than 900 kinds of bats. f 4 Nevada State Council on the Arts, recommended Bruner to the regents, noting that Bruner has actively promoted the development of the visual arts in Southern Nevada for more than 50 years. Bruner recently established the art museum's outreach program, which takes the visual arts into the rural c,ommunities of southern and central Nevada. The Rev. Caesar J. Caviglia of St. Peter's Catholic Church will be awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters. A native of Ely, Nev., Caviglia has been very active in supporting education in Southern Nevada. He holds a bachelor's degree from St. Mary's College, a master's in theology from the University of St. Bonaventure, and a master's in education from the University of San Francisco. Caviglia has held pastoral and parish positions in Reno, Carsoiji City, Virginia City, Las Vegas and Henderson since 1955. He presently chairs both the City of Henderson Master Plan Committee and the blue ribbon committee for the site selection, design, development and execution of the Henderson Convention Center. He is currently president of the Nevada Catholic Welfare Bureau and is past president of the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. An instructor in sociology and humanitiles at Clark County Community College from 1973 to 198.1, Caviglia is a member of the CCCC Advisory Board and of the advisory of the special committee for the Hen3erson campus. ^ Caviglia founded Growth Opportunities Inc., and serves as executive director of that program, which provides nutrition programs, socialization and transportation for senior citizens in Henderson, Boulder Cit.y and Searchlight. Frank H.T. Rhodes, UNVL's 1982 commencement speaker, will receive an honorary doctor of letters degree from UNLV • The ninth president of Cornell University, Rhodes is a geologist by training and holds the rank of professor of geology and mineralogy at Cornell. Before assuming the Cornell presidency, Rhodes was vice president for academic affairs at the University of Michigan for three years, where he taught geology and mineralogy. Charles Vanda, UNLV's director of concert hall programming, will be awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters. Vanda is best known locally as the man who has established UNLVs acclaimed Master Series, which is American .AadCroM + Together, • wecan change things approaching its seventh season of bringing the best performers-in classical music and dance to Artemus W. Ham Concert Hall. Vanda's career in the entertainment industry goes back to the 1920's when he was the youngest press agent on Broadway. In 1935 he joined CBS as publicity director and manager of the talent bureau which represented many of America's best known stars. Vanda produced and directed many top CBS radio programs, incuding "Stowkowski and the Telephone Hour"; "Arabian Nights," with Marlene Dietrich; "Country Lawyer," with Raymond Massey; "The Mary Martin Victor Moore Show"; and others. by Mike Zapolski In these days of runaway inflation and high prices, it's a time to celebrate when you can strike a good bargain. Well, for you folks who can brave the short 'trip up U.S. Highway 93 towards Boulder City, you'll be surprised to stumble oaa gold mind of big bargains. Wild Bill's Steak 'N Taters is a booming new eating place located at 2140 Boulder Highway out near Old Vegas. Many people know about the good food at Wild Bill's, because the parking lot is always jam packed, and if you are looking for low prices and good food, then Wild Bill's is the spot. Set in a western decor marked with all of the good or country fixings. Wild Bill's offeres scrumptious and taste tingljxig morsels for the hungry traveler. Steak 'N Taters features delicious weekly specials on a nightly basis, and best of all, for a low price you can get a meal that could feed any hungry cowboy just in from the range. Monday night's special is chicken splattered with rich barbecue sauc^. Other specials that are featured include chili, ribs, pepper steak and rice, and a Friday evening fish plate special for $2.95. For the steak lovers. Wild Bill's will satisfy your hunger with a mouth-watering New York steak for only $6.45. A Rib-Eye steak sandwich is $5.45, while a steak on a stick is $4.50. Steak N Taters also has a wide variety of choices on its sandwich menu. Tuna salad, tuna, chicken, and grilled cheese sandwiches are Th< n\% of anargy consumption in th U.S. liowad during th* 1970'i. offered for reasonable prices along with the all-time American favorite the hamburger. A meal-size chef salad with all of the trimmings is $4.25. If you are on a diet, Wild Bill's can take care of you, too. Wild Bill's diet plate includes cottage cheese, pears, peaches, and a hamburger patty for just $2.95. For the big eaters who can manage the sizeable dinner entree. Wild Bill's has a dessert selection that includes ice cream, apple pie, cheery pie, and cheese cake. ; If you want to be where the action is a^ every night, stop out at Wild Bill's. You'll get i great meal and sav^ some"^ money at the same time. i I SUN WORSHIPPER SPECIAL '10?? VEGAS OUTDOOR EACH CHAISE FURNITURE REFINISHING SCOO • Factory Fresh Finish jj"* • 2 Yr. Warranty t.MiH CHAIN Offf good mru Juna 15th, 1982 • 362-2559 WHti.Thla Coupon INJEGION MOLDING B MACHINE OPERATORS to work in a new plants located in JEAN, NEVADA. Excellent Working conditions, good fringe benefits including profit sharing. Person to apply must be in good health. Company may consider providing transportation. WILL TRAIN! Equal Opportunity Employer female /male apply at^ Nevada State Employment Security Department 119 Water St. Henderson, Nevada I —Vbll^^ gotyou beat tigain! VALLEY BANK RLB. Interest Rate 11.939% J 1.939% Annual Yield 12.666% 12.485% Interest Return^ $226.34 $223.24 Cash Bonus Total Dollar Earnings $20 -0$223.24 You earn more with Valley Bank's $7,500,91-day Money Market Certificate than with any other bankorS&L. Now, you don't have to tie up your funds for six months to earn high money market interest. Enjoy your big payoff at Valley Bank in only 91 days. Compare our total dollar earnings with F.I.B.'s. Valley Bank pays more Insured Safety Your Valley Bank Certificate is insured to $100,000 by FDIC, an agency of the Federal Government. Now, you can get in on today's high interest with Insured safety. Interest rate effective May 18 May 24, 1982 Sign up now and get a $20 cash bonus! Be at Valley Bank when the doors open and get $20 in cash for opening a 91-day Certificate. Spend it. save it, or add it to your Certificate and earn even more interest! $20 Cash Bonus with our 26-week Certificates too! Check it out! Our six-month Certificates earn a higher interest return with insured safety, plus a $20 cash bonus. Compare with any other bank— Valley Bank pays more. Sorry, F.I.B.! Federal regulations prohibit the compounding of interest, and require substantial interest penalty (or early withdrawal. One premium per family. \ ^MeyBank m MEMBER FDIC r^rr,;:;r; ^^V ^ Tii''W wp JW" '!' M ">" ^ ''* '|fiiiJW W'||'"' J" ^ ^ IHUl l i l l l l l HIK I Il. Water it the only subitar>c on sarth that it naturally present in three different forms ai a liquid, a lolid (ice) and a gat (water vapor). ^GATHER ROUND — The bunk house at Old Vegas will be the setting for the Gary LeMasters Band who will play for dancing and fun at the second andual Western Fling beneflt by the Auxiliary of Southern Nvevada nfemorial Hospital on Thursday, May 20th beginning at 5:30 p.m. at Old Vegas. Proceeds willgo for the purchase of renal dialysis equipment at the hospital. There will be great food, dancing and entertainment. Special guests will include Robert Goulet, Cork Procter, Janie McGowan and other strip entertainers. Gov. Robert List will also attend. For dinner tickets and the special raffle tickets call 383-2615. Pictured are Emily Razzano,Diane DiFiore, Nancy Lamb, auxiliary president, and Jaclue Uman. Chairman of the beneflt is Lynn Bennett. LIFELINE NUIMBERS FIra ,. 382-3000 Paramodica 382-3000 Matro(Pollc)and Ambulanca 385-1111 North LaaVagaaPdica 649-9111 Handaraon Pdlca SeSM33 BouldorClty Polica 293-1424 Sacrat WItnaaa 386-3213 PoiMnControl 732-4989 RETAIN FOR QUICK REFERENCE BREAKFAST BRUNCH 8-11 AM-11 AM-3:45 PM A delectable array of breakfast fare, plus salads, desserts, and surprise entrees $010 DINIIER 4-9:30 PM-Sat. till 11 PM A wide variety of dinner entrees, plus roast beef, carved to order, and a choice selection of salads, vegetables, and fionnemade desserts. 2 Includes Tax Includes coffee, tea or milk 15 Includes Tax Includes coffee, tea or nnilk PSC Approval Gives Phone Users Break Tlie Nevada Public Service Commission has approved a request by Central TelephoneNevada to charge one connection fee for Custom Calling Features regardless the number of features ordered at one time. Effective May 1, the Centel request means a $10 installation charge for one or all four calling features. Formerly the charges were a minimum of $10 per feature ordered. Now customers who wish to order all the Custom Calling Feaures can save up to $40 on the installation charges, said Chuck Anderson, Centel Regulatory Manager. "We also can install the 30-number speed calling feature for $10 instead of the $20 charge in the past." With the installation charge is a one Hme only $6 fee to process the order. Pending with the PSC is a proposed fifth CusThe world's first parachute jump from a balloon was made by Andre Garnerin of France In 1797. tom Calling Feature Call Within which will transform residential phones into an intercom system for just 50 cents a month. Features currently available in residential areas served by computer switching systems include Call Waiting, $1.50 per month; Call Forwarding, $1.25; Three-Way Calling, $2.25 and Speed Calling, $2.25 for eight numbers and $7 for 30 numbers. Business rates are slightly higher for all features. "For residents these features cost as little as four cents which is a real bargain for the convenience and service provided," said Anderson. ::itTHE UNEXPECTED HAPPENS, rM RIGHT HERE" Spedaiang in your individual, family. Group Health Insurance needs • Health Plans) • AcddenVdisability, and sickness supplements : • Medicare supplements • Vision and dental •W CONCERN IS THE INSURANCE NEEDS OF MY NEIGHBORS'. Ken Usherson Your Independent Insurance Agent 5Si-f72J r ^2^ tPXAS .*4 \ ^ The 'Tony"Award winning musical hit of Broadway showtimes H pm .iml Midniv'hi D.uli Mond, DESERIJNN aiuKvOuntrA (]luh No Tickets Neces'-.sn,For Reservations Please Call 733 4566 Nautilus FITNGSS CGNT6R OF BOULOeR CITY ^ MOST LUJgjRIOUS NAUTILUS IN THE STATF • SHOWERS • LOCKERS • STEAM RMS. • • SPA • LOUNGE • AEROBICS CLASSES • r LIFE CYCLES M ^ 1 'S Times The Results In 1/lOth the Time" STARTING JUNE 7TH NEW HOURS: Monday thru Friday 6-10 pjn. Saturday 9-5 Sunday 9-3 STAY FIT What b NatMis? The Nautilus fitness system can be deflned as a unique program of total conditioning tliat not only includes overall increase in muscular strength and endurance, but more importantly, improved tone flexibility and cardiovascular health. Currently in use by most professional sports teams, tennis and rac* quetball pros, the U.S. Military Academy, over 300 universities and colleges, and nearly 2,000 fitness centers. The Nautilus system has produced significant results for these athletes, and the general public as well. ^ MEMBERSHIP UMITED IN HOUR EQUIPMENT, • -m* AND FACILTES USED. 1402 Nevada Hwy. Boukler City 29M227

PAGE 25

wmmi wm T Page 24 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News UNLV Commencement Awards Thursday, May 20,1982. tjuurtiu^y, tuay lit, itfo^ Steak TH Taters' Good For Bg Eaters UNLV will graduate 1,178 students May 23 at 2:30 p.m. in the Las Vegas Convention Center Rotunda in a ceremony that will include presentation of honorary degrees and Distinguished Nevadan Awards to a group of S rominent Southern evadans selected by l^e Board of Regents. : Marjorie Barrick, creator of the Barric Endowment Fund at UNLV, will be honored as a Distinguished Nevadan Barrick and her late husband. Edward, came to Las Vegas in 1950 from Omaha. She earned a business education degree from Creighton University and has enrolled in courses at UNLV for many years. In 1979, the Barncks, along with business associates from Omaha, donated a piece of downtown property now valued at more than a quarter of a million dollars to the UNLV College of Business and Economics. The following year, Mrs. Barrick presented UNLV a gift of more than $1 million to endow a lecture series, two fellpwships, a faculty development fund and a research fund. Eileen B. Brookman, a former member of the Nevada Assembly, will also receive the Distinguished Nevadan Award Irwin A Molasky, chairman of UNLV's FoundationFund Board, will receive the Distinguished Nevadan Award for his community service and contributions to the growth of Las Vegas. Former Nevada Gov. Mike O'Callaghan cited Molasky for his exemplary service to the state in economic and social areas, and the Prime Minister of Israel has acknowledged his as' sistance in that nation's economic develop,Tnent. : Molasky is a.Century •Club Lifetime Member :of the Boulder Dam '.Area Boy Scouts of 'America, and a regent • of the Society of Fellows, Anti Defamation League, of which he served as Nevada chairman. Lucile Spire Bruner, a local artist and • teacher who recently .won the Governor's : Arts Award, will perceive an honorary doc' .'torate in humane letJters. \ A muralist Whose •work includes New ;Deal-era paintings in -Oklahoma, Bruner's artworks are included in several public collections, including those held by the Oklahoma Historical Society; the Amarillo Public Library in Amarillo, Texas; the Las Vegas Art Museum; Clark County Public Library; James Dickinson Lib.raryatUNLV; and in five Las Vegas banks. Helene FoUmer, member of the Allied Arts Council and the Accountants Invite L Visitors Thejnembcrs of the American JSociety of Women Accountants, Las Vgas Chapter #10S^ invite students of accounting and persons working in the accounting profession to a "Getting To Know Us" gathering at the "Tiojne of Sharon McNair. CPA. 1705 : Eurnard Drive, Las Vegas, Sunday, June 6th from 2;00 to 4i00 vp.ni. For information •call MarUyn Dille at !38M646 or Sharon at J46.0888. All interest: ed persons are 'Welcome. BATS ABOUND There are more than 900 kinds of bats. f 4 Nevada State Council on the Arts, recommended Bruner to the regents, noting that Bruner has actively promoted the development of the visual arts in Southern Nevada for more than 50 years. Bruner recently established the art museum's outreach program, which takes the visual arts into the rural c,ommunities of southern and central Nevada. The Rev. Caesar J. Caviglia of St. Peter's Catholic Church will be awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters. A native of Ely, Nev., Caviglia has been very active in supporting education in Southern Nevada. He holds a bachelor's degree from St. Mary's College, a master's in theology from the University of St. Bonaventure, and a master's in education from the University of San Francisco. Caviglia has held pastoral and parish positions in Reno, Carsoiji City, Virginia City, Las Vegas and Henderson since 1955. He presently chairs both the City of Henderson Master Plan Committee and the blue ribbon committee for the site selection, design, development and execution of the Henderson Convention Center. He is currently president of the Nevada Catholic Welfare Bureau and is past president of the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. An instructor in sociology and humanitiles at Clark County Community College from 1973 to 198.1, Caviglia is a member of the CCCC Advisory Board and of the advisory of the special committee for the Hen3erson campus. ^ Caviglia founded Growth Opportunities Inc., and serves as executive director of that program, which provides nutrition programs, socialization and transportation for senior citizens in Henderson, Boulder Cit.y and Searchlight. Frank H.T. Rhodes, UNVL's 1982 commencement speaker, will receive an honorary doctor of letters degree from UNLV • The ninth president of Cornell University, Rhodes is a geologist by training and holds the rank of professor of geology and mineralogy at Cornell. Before assuming the Cornell presidency, Rhodes was vice president for academic affairs at the University of Michigan for three years, where he taught geology and mineralogy. Charles Vanda, UNLV's director of concert hall programming, will be awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters. Vanda is best known locally as the man who has established UNLVs acclaimed Master Series, which is American .AadCroM + Together, • wecan change things approaching its seventh season of bringing the best performers-in classical music and dance to Artemus W. Ham Concert Hall. Vanda's career in the entertainment industry goes back to the 1920's when he was the youngest press agent on Broadway. In 1935 he joined CBS as publicity director and manager of the talent bureau which represented many of America's best known stars. Vanda produced and directed many top CBS radio programs, incuding "Stowkowski and the Telephone Hour"; "Arabian Nights," with Marlene Dietrich; "Country Lawyer," with Raymond Massey; "The Mary Martin Victor Moore Show"; and others. by Mike Zapolski In these days of runaway inflation and high prices, it's a time to celebrate when you can strike a good bargain. Well, for you folks who can brave the short 'trip up U.S. Highway 93 towards Boulder City, you'll be surprised to stumble oaa gold mind of big bargains. Wild Bill's Steak 'N Taters is a booming new eating place located at 2140 Boulder Highway out near Old Vegas. Many people know about the good food at Wild Bill's, because the parking lot is always jam packed, and if you are looking for low prices and good food, then Wild Bill's is the spot. Set in a western decor marked with all of the good or country fixings. Wild Bill's offeres scrumptious and taste tingljxig morsels for the hungry traveler. Steak 'N Taters features delicious weekly specials on a nightly basis, and best of all, for a low price you can get a meal that could feed any hungry cowboy just in from the range. Monday night's special is chicken splattered with rich barbecue sauc^. Other specials that are featured include chili, ribs, pepper steak and rice, and a Friday evening fish plate special for $2.95. For the steak lovers. Wild Bill's will satisfy your hunger with a mouth-watering New York steak for only $6.45. A Rib-Eye steak sandwich is $5.45, while a steak on a stick is $4.50. Steak N Taters also has a wide variety of choices on its sandwich menu. Tuna salad, tuna, chicken, and grilled cheese sandwiches are Th< n\% of anargy consumption in th U.S. liowad during th* 1970'i. offered for reasonable prices along with the all-time American favorite the hamburger. A meal-size chef salad with all of the trimmings is $4.25. If you are on a diet, Wild Bill's can take care of you, too. Wild Bill's diet plate includes cottage cheese, pears, peaches, and a hamburger patty for just $2.95. For the big eaters who can manage the sizeable dinner entree. Wild Bill's has a dessert selection that includes ice cream, apple pie, cheery pie, and cheese cake. ; If you want to be where the action is a^ every night, stop out at Wild Bill's. You'll get i great meal and sav^ some"^ money at the same time. i I SUN WORSHIPPER SPECIAL '10?? VEGAS OUTDOOR EACH CHAISE FURNITURE REFINISHING SCOO • Factory Fresh Finish jj"* • 2 Yr. Warranty t.MiH CHAIN Offf good mru Juna 15th, 1982 • 362-2559 WHti.Thla Coupon INJEGION MOLDING B MACHINE OPERATORS to work in a new plants located in JEAN, NEVADA. Excellent Working conditions, good fringe benefits including profit sharing. Person to apply must be in good health. Company may consider providing transportation. WILL TRAIN! Equal Opportunity Employer female /male apply at^ Nevada State Employment Security Department 119 Water St. Henderson, Nevada I —Vbll^^ gotyou beat tigain! VALLEY BANK RLB. Interest Rate 11.939% J 1.939% Annual Yield 12.666% 12.485% Interest Return^ $226.34 $223.24 Cash Bonus Total Dollar Earnings $20 -0$223.24 You earn more with Valley Bank's $7,500,91-day Money Market Certificate than with any other bankorS&L. Now, you don't have to tie up your funds for six months to earn high money market interest. Enjoy your big payoff at Valley Bank in only 91 days. Compare our total dollar earnings with F.I.B.'s. Valley Bank pays more Insured Safety Your Valley Bank Certificate is insured to $100,000 by FDIC, an agency of the Federal Government. Now, you can get in on today's high interest with Insured safety. Interest rate effective May 18 May 24, 1982 Sign up now and get a $20 cash bonus! Be at Valley Bank when the doors open and get $20 in cash for opening a 91-day Certificate. Spend it. save it, or add it to your Certificate and earn even more interest! $20 Cash Bonus with our 26-week Certificates too! Check it out! Our six-month Certificates earn a higher interest return with insured safety, plus a $20 cash bonus. Compare with any other bank— Valley Bank pays more. Sorry, F.I.B.! Federal regulations prohibit the compounding of interest, and require substantial interest penalty (or early withdrawal. One premium per family. \ ^MeyBank m MEMBER FDIC r^rr,;:;r; ^^V ^ Tii''W wp JW" '!' M ">" ^ ''* '|fiiiJW W'||'"' J" ^ ^ IHUl l i l l l l l HIK I Il. Water it the only subitar>c on sarth that it naturally present in three different forms ai a liquid, a lolid (ice) and a gat (water vapor). ^GATHER ROUND — The bunk house at Old Vegas will be the setting for the Gary LeMasters Band who will play for dancing and fun at the second andual Western Fling beneflt by the Auxiliary of Southern Nvevada nfemorial Hospital on Thursday, May 20th beginning at 5:30 p.m. at Old Vegas. Proceeds willgo for the purchase of renal dialysis equipment at the hospital. There will be great food, dancing and entertainment. Special guests will include Robert Goulet, Cork Procter, Janie McGowan and other strip entertainers. Gov. Robert List will also attend. For dinner tickets and the special raffle tickets call 383-2615. Pictured are Emily Razzano,Diane DiFiore, Nancy Lamb, auxiliary president, and Jaclue Uman. Chairman of the beneflt is Lynn Bennett. LIFELINE NUIMBERS FIra ,. 382-3000 Paramodica 382-3000 Matro(Pollc)and Ambulanca 385-1111 North LaaVagaaPdica 649-9111 Handaraon Pdlca SeSM33 BouldorClty Polica 293-1424 Sacrat WItnaaa 386-3213 PoiMnControl 732-4989 RETAIN FOR QUICK REFERENCE BREAKFAST BRUNCH 8-11 AM-11 AM-3:45 PM A delectable array of breakfast fare, plus salads, desserts, and surprise entrees $010 DINIIER 4-9:30 PM-Sat. till 11 PM A wide variety of dinner entrees, plus roast beef, carved to order, and a choice selection of salads, vegetables, and fionnemade desserts. 2 Includes Tax Includes coffee, tea or milk 15 Includes Tax Includes coffee, tea or nnilk PSC Approval Gives Phone Users Break Tlie Nevada Public Service Commission has approved a request by Central TelephoneNevada to charge one connection fee for Custom Calling Features regardless the number of features ordered at one time. Effective May 1, the Centel request means a $10 installation charge for one or all four calling features. Formerly the charges were a minimum of $10 per feature ordered. Now customers who wish to order all the Custom Calling Feaures can save up to $40 on the installation charges, said Chuck Anderson, Centel Regulatory Manager. "We also can install the 30-number speed calling feature for $10 instead of the $20 charge in the past." With the installation charge is a one Hme only $6 fee to process the order. Pending with the PSC is a proposed fifth CusThe world's first parachute jump from a balloon was made by Andre Garnerin of France In 1797. tom Calling Feature Call Within which will transform residential phones into an intercom system for just 50 cents a month. Features currently available in residential areas served by computer switching systems include Call Waiting, $1.50 per month; Call Forwarding, $1.25; Three-Way Calling, $2.25 and Speed Calling, $2.25 for eight numbers and $7 for 30 numbers. Business rates are slightly higher for all features. "For residents these features cost as little as four cents which is a real bargain for the convenience and service provided," said Anderson. ::itTHE UNEXPECTED HAPPENS, rM RIGHT HERE" Spedaiang in your individual, family. Group Health Insurance needs • Health Plans) • AcddenVdisability, and sickness supplements : • Medicare supplements • Vision and dental •W CONCERN IS THE INSURANCE NEEDS OF MY NEIGHBORS'. Ken Usherson Your Independent Insurance Agent 5Si-f72J r ^2^ tPXAS .*4 \ ^ The 'Tony"Award winning musical hit of Broadway showtimes H pm .iml Midniv'hi D.uli Mond, DESERIJNN aiuKvOuntrA (]luh No Tickets Neces'-.sn,For Reservations Please Call 733 4566 Nautilus FITNGSS CGNT6R OF BOULOeR CITY ^ MOST LUJgjRIOUS NAUTILUS IN THE STATF • SHOWERS • LOCKERS • STEAM RMS. • • SPA • LOUNGE • AEROBICS CLASSES • r LIFE CYCLES M ^ 1 'S Times The Results In 1/lOth the Time" STARTING JUNE 7TH NEW HOURS: Monday thru Friday 6-10 pjn. Saturday 9-5 Sunday 9-3 STAY FIT What b NatMis? The Nautilus fitness system can be deflned as a unique program of total conditioning tliat not only includes overall increase in muscular strength and endurance, but more importantly, improved tone flexibility and cardiovascular health. Currently in use by most professional sports teams, tennis and rac* quetball pros, the U.S. Military Academy, over 300 universities and colleges, and nearly 2,000 fitness centers. The Nautilus system has produced significant results for these athletes, and the general public as well. ^ MEMBERSHIP UMITED IN HOUR EQUIPMENT, • -m* AND FACILTES USED. 1402 Nevada Hwy. Boukler City 29M227

PAGE 26

i^^^ I ^1^^ Page 26 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday, May 20,198 MUSIC May is Jazz Month, sponsored by the Las Vegas Jazz Society, the City of Las Vegas, the City of Henderson, and the Allied Arts Council. Call 734-8556 for Jazz Month information. Scott Tibbs and the Eightette, Lorenzi Park. 1 to 5 p.m.. May 23. Free. 784-8556. Jay Cameron and the Saxx Maniaxx, Alan Grant's Jazz Night at the Four Queens, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.. May 24. Broadcast live in part on KNPR 89.5 FM. 737-5746. ,. .Jay Cameron and Friends with Edie Aikels, French Quarter Lounge, Four Queens, May 23,5 to "?).m.. May 24, 1 to 5 p.m. 737-5746. "UNLV Jazz Band, City Hall. May 25, noon. Free. 739-3332. Raoul Romero Quintet, Morrell Park, Henderson, May 26, 6 to 9 p.m. Free. 565-2120. Jay Cameron and the Saxx Maniaxx, Reed Whipple Center, May 27, 7 p.m. Free. 386-6211. Friday night jam session at Pogos Tavern, May 28, 9;30 p.m. to 2 a.m. 648-9935. Milestones, in concert. Flamingo Library, 2 p.m.. May 29. Free. 733-7810. Jazz Picnic in Sunset Park, May 30, noon. Free. 734-8556. James Toney and the Countdowns, midnight to 5 a.m., all week, the Speakeasy. 735-5053. Nevada String Quartet, final concert of the season. Flamingo Library, May 23, 2 p.m. Free. 733-8910. Las Vegas Community Band, Rancho High Band Room, May 24, 7 p.m. Players of all ages wanted. Call 736-6037 between 6 and 7 p.m. any night but Monday. "From Blues Alley in Washington, DC," George Shearing, Brian Torff, John Coates, Jr., May 29, 3 p.m., KNPR 89.5 FM. 456-6695. Norma Teagarden, on "Marian McPartland • Piano Jazz," May 29, 11 p.m.. KNPR 89.5 FM. 456-6695. "Jazz with Monk Montgomery," on "Inner-View with Charles Supin.' May 24, 6:30 p.m. 737-1010. THEATER "Gold Throat," Rainbow Company Children's Theatre, Reed Whipple Center, May 23, 2 p.m.. final performance. 386-6553. "An Evening of the Best 'Scenes of the Decade,'" presented by Joe Behar's Community Drama Workshop, Flamingo Library, May 23,7 p.m. Free. 733-7810. "Death Trap," The Meadows Playhouse, 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday with a 2 p.m. Saturday matinee and a 7 p.m. first night social hour. May 25 through June 19. 739-7525. Community Drama Workshop, Church of Religious Science Rec Room, 1420 E. Harmon, every Thursday at 8 p.m. Free. 7314291. VISUAL ART • Cindy McCoy, large-scale acrylics. First Western Savings, 2700 West Sahara, through June 11. presented by the Allied Arts Council. 871-2000. Edward Sheriff Curtis photography exhibit. Reed Whipple Center, through May 28. 386-6211. Bonnie Howard, oils and acrylics, Henderson Library, through May 31. 565-9247. Robert HoUis, oils, acrylics, watercolors. and drawings. Main Gallery; June Buchanan, oils, watercolors, and pastels, and May Shaw, watercolors and oils, Nevada Arts' Gallery; and Charles Russell reproductions. Young Peoples' Gallery; Las Vegas Art Museum, Lorenzi Park, through June 1. 647-4300. "Fiber in the Family," mother and daughter fiber arts exhibit, through May 28. 733-7810. Kenneth Osthimer, photography. Flamingo Library Upstairs Gallery, through May 31. 733-7810. Nevada Watercolor Society exhibit. Reed Whipple Center, May 30 through June 25.386-6211. DANCE The Tamburitzans of Duquesne University in a festival of folk music, song, and dance. Las Vegas Alfied Arts Calendar May 23-29 High School auditorium. May 26,8 p.m. 733-8261 or 3847583. LITERATURE Great Books Discussion Group; topic: "A Good Man is Hard to Find," by Flannery O'Connor, Flamingo Library conference room. May 26.7 p.m. Free. 733-7810. FILM "The Appaloosa." with Marlon Brando and John Saxon, part of the series "Good Guys Wear White Hats," Flamingo Library. May 26, 7 p.m. Free. 733-7810. • VARIETY Friends of Southern Nevada Libraries board meeting. Flamingo Library board room, May 25. 7:30 p.m. Public welcome. 733-7810. The following are some of the deadlines for grant applications to the National Endowment for the Arts: June 21: Choreographers' Fellowships (including U.S.-Japan Fellowships). July 23: Grants to Dance Presenters. May 25; Design Demonstration, Design Exploration Research, Design Communication, SeniorLevel Sabbatical Fellowships, Individual Project Fellowships, Entering Professional Designer Project Fellowships. June 18: Grants to Presenting Organizations, Services to Presenting Organizations. June 1: Film-Video Exhibition. July 20: Radio Projects. June 28: Utilizations of Museum Collections. Catalogue, Conservation. May 28: Chamber Music and New Music Performance. June 1: Music Festivals,. June 9: Centers for New Music Resources. Services to Composers. June 10: Jazz-Organizations, Jazz-Special Projects. July 1: Music Professional Training. JazzIndividuals. July 7: Solo Recitalists-Presenters and Career Development Specialists. July 16: Orchestra. New Social Security Hours The Social Security contact stations in Hendersoiv and Boulder City^^fd^l have new hours. Starting May 26 the Henderson office will open at 9:30 a.m. and close at 4 p.m. each Wednesday and Thursday, however, beginning June 3 the Henderson office will close at 12 noon on Thursdays, but will still be open until 4 p.m. on Wednesdays. The Boulder City contact station will open at 9:30 a.m. and close at 12 noon each Tuesday starting May 25. In 1829, Ohio legislators enacted a statute authorizing the first night school classes in the nation. May 25: Professional Opera-Musical Theater Companies. Regional Touring, Producers' Grants, Services to the Art. June 3: Art in Public Places. July IS: Visual Artists' Organizations. For further informatcon on NEA grants and the rest of the year's deadlines, call the Allied Arts Council at 385-7345. All local organizations are asked to please send information on their events to the Allied Arts Council, 420 S. 7th Street. Las Vegas 8910<1, for inclusion in its computer calendar, to help in avoiding scheduling conflicts. Call 385-7345 for information on subscribing to the calendar, or to join the Allied Arts Council. ^ 1ST RUN • SPECIAL SHOWING 1 wk. only— Starts Fr. May 21st A young couple become innocent viclinis FREE ART PRINT GIVEAWAY r; q VALUABLE COUPON ^ PREMNT THIS COUPON AT THE EL CORTEZ PROMOTION DESK DOWNTOWN. 6TH AND FREMONT ONE FREE LARQE 16" X 20" ART PRINT NO OBLIQATION WHATSOEVER—LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER OFFER GOOD WHILE SUPPLY LASTS-SORRY NO MINORS JS;. EL CORTEZ >5rHOTEL AND CASINO fTH tMD FREMONT • DOWNTOWN • PllNTY Of FRI[ NRKW6 DUcouni LIQUOR (WINE STORE $399 BODTCOORSieMILLER LITE 12 PACK Plus Many, Many, More Discounted Prices I "\ RETAIL JOSE CUERVO-GOLD .. Liter 8.95 JIM BEAM Liter 6.75 SEAGRAMS 7 CROWN .. Liter 6.95 SEAGRAMS V.O .. Liter 10.15 GILBEYSGIN Liter 6.65 EARLY TIMES Liter 6.69 J&B SCOTCH .. Liter 12.15 BACARDI RUM-SILVER.... .. Liter 6.55 POPOV VODKA .. Liter 4.89 SMIRNOFF VODKA .. Liter 6.29 JACK DANIELS .. Liter 9.65 CANADIAN CLUB .. Liter 10.99 CHRISTIAN BROS. BRANDY .. Liter 7.65 BLUE NUN .750 ML 4.45 Stop-N-io liquor RETAIL JIM BEAM.. 1.75L 11.90 SEAGRAMS 7 CROWN 1.7SL 12.15 SEAGRAMS V.O 1.75L 17.95 GILBEYSGIN 1.75L 11.65 J&B SCOTCH 1.75L 20.59 BACARDI RUM-SILVER 1.75L 11.19 POPOV VODKA 1.75L 8.99 SMIRNOFF VODKA 1.75L 10.89 JOSE CUERVO-WHITE 1.75L 14.05 KESSLER 1.75L 11.49 ALMADENMTNS 1.5L 4.35 CARLO ROSSI WINE 1.5L 2.89 GALLOWINE 1.5L 3.79 ANDRE CHAMPAGNE .. .Tr.750ML 2.65 EXPIRATION DATE 6-14-82 850 HORIZON HENDERSON Thursday, May 20, 1982 • % lienaeraon ttome i^cv aa owuiaei v/u> • < K M New Horizons Offers New Phase Lewis Homes Community The sixth successive phase of New Horizons has orficially opened for sales, announces Lewis Homes, developer of the popular Henderson community. The eleven new three and four bedroom Ihomes are priced ft"om the low $70,000s and are • available with 30-year. fixed rate VA, FHA or conventional financing at excellent below market interest rates. Home buytrs have been drawn to New Horizons by its tranquil hilltop surroundings, coupled with its nearness to an elementary school, public park and golf course all within easy walking distance. The homes are set on oversized, terraces lots overlooking the entire Las Vegas valley. Each of the three stylings in the new phase affbrds a full complement of quality construction features which has made Lewis Homes a consistent choice of new home buyers in the Las Vegas area for 20 years. New Horizons' floor plans, affording up to 1.733 square feet of living area, are enhanced by spacious family rooms, luxurious master bedroom suites and luminous • ceilinged kitchens. Well planned, for convenience and efficiency, the kitchens feature eye level ranges and ovens, dishwashers, pantries and instant hot water dispensers. Highlights of the various single story plans include handsome wood burning fireplaces with gas lot lighter, raised entries, cathedral ceilings and separate dining areas. Home seekers will be impressed with Lewis Homes' attention to detail and styling as they note ceiling lights in all bedrooms, decorative light fixtures, dual pane windows and Corian marble counter tops in each bathroom. Wall-to-wall carpeting beautifies living rooms, dining areas, hallways and all bedrooms and closets. Lewis Homes' regional sales manager, Doug Schroeder, suggested that buyers visit New Horizons now for best selection of location and floor plan styling. To reach the community, take Boulder Highway to Horizon Drive (just south of Henderson) and turn west (right) to the models, open daily from 10 i a.m. to 6 p.m. ••••••••••*•••*•*•••••• ^GRAND OPENING^ ^ CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS I 27 WATER ST. I Free Food b Refreshments I 6-8 PM THURS MAY 20tti ( BRING THE FAMILY ^ D. JIM JEINSEIN ^ t COINTY COMMISSIONER A" *'' [••••••••••••••••••••••* ^rm^-im^ Hrms Slate 'Concert of Caring' A major country music event, the "Concert of Caring" benefiting Southern California children with special developmental needs, seems to prove President Reagan's theory that corporate caring really does exist. For months, the two major companies who initiated the project the Los Angeles Division of Safeway and top country music radio station KLAC -have worked tirelessly with other "caring" companies to bring about the concert that will raise funds for summer camps, special training camps for the Special Olympics, and other much needed community services for the developmentally disabled children. Generously contributing time and services are A&L Awards, American Airlines, A-S-K Travel, Inc., Avis Rent A Car, Bristol Coach Limousines, CBS Records, Challenge Graphics, Editel, Electra Records, Fad Times, Fotoset Typographers, Jet Artierican Airlines, Ray M^ Johnson Studio, Long'Beach Arena, Madman Graphics, PSA. Airlines, Pacific Records, Scotti Brothers Records, Serigraphics, Sound Services, Inc., Warner Brothers Records, as well as all the performers. Scheduled for Sunday, May 23 at 7:00 p.m., in the Long Beach Arena, the "Concert of Caring" will star grammy winner, Dottie West and will be hosted by "Real People TV personality, Skip Stephenson, who will also perform with the many other "Country Music Stars Who Care". Dottie West headlines the show. Also appearing will be The Burrito Brothers, Lacy J. Dalton, the 1981-82 Academy of Country Awards Duo of the Year, David Frizzell and Shelly West, Doug Kershaw, Sylvia and "Dukes of Hazzard" Superstar Tom Wopat. Pat Boone will also perform as a special guest star. "We've kept the tickets priced so that the concert will be affordable", says Safeway Vice President Division Manager, Mr. Al Fulton, "and the 7:00 p.m. curtain times makes it a perfect family event." KLAC Vice President and General Manager, Don Kelly also stated, "Not in the last decade Transportation to Jean have you been able to go to a concert event like this for only $8.50$6.40, and the big thing is everybody wins." Tickets are on sale at the Long Beach Area Box Office, Mutual, Ticketron and Chargeline. Ticket discount coupons good for $2.50 off the $11.00 ticket and $1.00 off the $7.50 ticket, are available at all 158 L.A. Division Safeway Stores. Publicity and support has been strong for the event. President Reagan has already recognized this "private sector initiative" by sending a letter of appreciation to Mr. Fulton at Safeway thanking them and KLAC Metromedia Radio for caring. Friends Outside; a Volunteer, community service organization working with families of prisoners, offers free bus transportation to Southern Nevada Correctional Center at Jea^, Nevada every Saturday. For information and pick-up locations, call 735-1213. DonaJd J. Borgos an Aasbtaol Vice PrMident at Flrat Inlmtato Bank of Nevada, N.A., haa been named Bianch Manager at the bank'a Troplcana Center ofllee. Borgoa joined the bank'a Management IhUning program In 1970. He waa named Manager of the Weotland MaD (rfOce In 1974 and received an appointment aa Aaelatant Vice Preoldent in 1980. He la Vice Piealdent of the Nevada Safety ConncU, Treaaorer of the Weetland MaO Merchanta Aaaodatlon, and a member of the Red lock Optlmlat Qob, the Betlted OflBcera Aaaodatlon and the Air Force Aaaodatkm. OPENING MAY 17TH Little dealer little prices Authorized dealer Hoover-Eureka Rainbow FREE in home Rainbow Demonstration 331 S. Water St. Hend 565-7170 • y<<
PAGE 27

i^^^ I ^1^^ Page 26 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday, May 20,198 MUSIC May is Jazz Month, sponsored by the Las Vegas Jazz Society, the City of Las Vegas, the City of Henderson, and the Allied Arts Council. Call 734-8556 for Jazz Month information. Scott Tibbs and the Eightette, Lorenzi Park. 1 to 5 p.m.. May 23. Free. 784-8556. Jay Cameron and the Saxx Maniaxx, Alan Grant's Jazz Night at the Four Queens, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.. May 24. Broadcast live in part on KNPR 89.5 FM. 737-5746. ,. .Jay Cameron and Friends with Edie Aikels, French Quarter Lounge, Four Queens, May 23,5 to "?).m.. May 24, 1 to 5 p.m. 737-5746. "UNLV Jazz Band, City Hall. May 25, noon. Free. 739-3332. Raoul Romero Quintet, Morrell Park, Henderson, May 26, 6 to 9 p.m. Free. 565-2120. Jay Cameron and the Saxx Maniaxx, Reed Whipple Center, May 27, 7 p.m. Free. 386-6211. Friday night jam session at Pogos Tavern, May 28, 9;30 p.m. to 2 a.m. 648-9935. Milestones, in concert. Flamingo Library, 2 p.m.. May 29. Free. 733-7810. Jazz Picnic in Sunset Park, May 30, noon. Free. 734-8556. James Toney and the Countdowns, midnight to 5 a.m., all week, the Speakeasy. 735-5053. Nevada String Quartet, final concert of the season. Flamingo Library, May 23, 2 p.m. Free. 733-8910. Las Vegas Community Band, Rancho High Band Room, May 24, 7 p.m. Players of all ages wanted. Call 736-6037 between 6 and 7 p.m. any night but Monday. "From Blues Alley in Washington, DC," George Shearing, Brian Torff, John Coates, Jr., May 29, 3 p.m., KNPR 89.5 FM. 456-6695. Norma Teagarden, on "Marian McPartland • Piano Jazz," May 29, 11 p.m.. KNPR 89.5 FM. 456-6695. "Jazz with Monk Montgomery," on "Inner-View with Charles Supin.' May 24, 6:30 p.m. 737-1010. THEATER "Gold Throat," Rainbow Company Children's Theatre, Reed Whipple Center, May 23, 2 p.m.. final performance. 386-6553. "An Evening of the Best 'Scenes of the Decade,'" presented by Joe Behar's Community Drama Workshop, Flamingo Library, May 23,7 p.m. Free. 733-7810. "Death Trap," The Meadows Playhouse, 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday with a 2 p.m. Saturday matinee and a 7 p.m. first night social hour. May 25 through June 19. 739-7525. Community Drama Workshop, Church of Religious Science Rec Room, 1420 E. Harmon, every Thursday at 8 p.m. Free. 7314291. VISUAL ART • Cindy McCoy, large-scale acrylics. First Western Savings, 2700 West Sahara, through June 11. presented by the Allied Arts Council. 871-2000. Edward Sheriff Curtis photography exhibit. Reed Whipple Center, through May 28. 386-6211. Bonnie Howard, oils and acrylics, Henderson Library, through May 31. 565-9247. Robert HoUis, oils, acrylics, watercolors. and drawings. Main Gallery; June Buchanan, oils, watercolors, and pastels, and May Shaw, watercolors and oils, Nevada Arts' Gallery; and Charles Russell reproductions. Young Peoples' Gallery; Las Vegas Art Museum, Lorenzi Park, through June 1. 647-4300. "Fiber in the Family," mother and daughter fiber arts exhibit, through May 28. 733-7810. Kenneth Osthimer, photography. Flamingo Library Upstairs Gallery, through May 31. 733-7810. Nevada Watercolor Society exhibit. Reed Whipple Center, May 30 through June 25.386-6211. DANCE The Tamburitzans of Duquesne University in a festival of folk music, song, and dance. Las Vegas Alfied Arts Calendar May 23-29 High School auditorium. May 26,8 p.m. 733-8261 or 3847583. LITERATURE Great Books Discussion Group; topic: "A Good Man is Hard to Find," by Flannery O'Connor, Flamingo Library conference room. May 26.7 p.m. Free. 733-7810. FILM "The Appaloosa." with Marlon Brando and John Saxon, part of the series "Good Guys Wear White Hats," Flamingo Library. May 26, 7 p.m. Free. 733-7810. • VARIETY Friends of Southern Nevada Libraries board meeting. Flamingo Library board room, May 25. 7:30 p.m. Public welcome. 733-7810. The following are some of the deadlines for grant applications to the National Endowment for the Arts: June 21: Choreographers' Fellowships (including U.S.-Japan Fellowships). July 23: Grants to Dance Presenters. May 25; Design Demonstration, Design Exploration Research, Design Communication, SeniorLevel Sabbatical Fellowships, Individual Project Fellowships, Entering Professional Designer Project Fellowships. June 18: Grants to Presenting Organizations, Services to Presenting Organizations. June 1: Film-Video Exhibition. July 20: Radio Projects. June 28: Utilizations of Museum Collections. Catalogue, Conservation. May 28: Chamber Music and New Music Performance. June 1: Music Festivals,. June 9: Centers for New Music Resources. Services to Composers. June 10: Jazz-Organizations, Jazz-Special Projects. July 1: Music Professional Training. JazzIndividuals. July 7: Solo Recitalists-Presenters and Career Development Specialists. July 16: Orchestra. New Social Security Hours The Social Security contact stations in Hendersoiv and Boulder City^^fd^l have new hours. Starting May 26 the Henderson office will open at 9:30 a.m. and close at 4 p.m. each Wednesday and Thursday, however, beginning June 3 the Henderson office will close at 12 noon on Thursdays, but will still be open until 4 p.m. on Wednesdays. The Boulder City contact station will open at 9:30 a.m. and close at 12 noon each Tuesday starting May 25. In 1829, Ohio legislators enacted a statute authorizing the first night school classes in the nation. May 25: Professional Opera-Musical Theater Companies. Regional Touring, Producers' Grants, Services to the Art. June 3: Art in Public Places. July IS: Visual Artists' Organizations. For further informatcon on NEA grants and the rest of the year's deadlines, call the Allied Arts Council at 385-7345. All local organizations are asked to please send information on their events to the Allied Arts Council, 420 S. 7th Street. Las Vegas 8910<1, for inclusion in its computer calendar, to help in avoiding scheduling conflicts. Call 385-7345 for information on subscribing to the calendar, or to join the Allied Arts Council. ^ 1ST RUN • SPECIAL SHOWING 1 wk. only— Starts Fr. May 21st A young couple become innocent viclinis FREE ART PRINT GIVEAWAY r; q VALUABLE COUPON ^ PREMNT THIS COUPON AT THE EL CORTEZ PROMOTION DESK DOWNTOWN. 6TH AND FREMONT ONE FREE LARQE 16" X 20" ART PRINT NO OBLIQATION WHATSOEVER—LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER OFFER GOOD WHILE SUPPLY LASTS-SORRY NO MINORS JS;. EL CORTEZ >5rHOTEL AND CASINO fTH tMD FREMONT • DOWNTOWN • PllNTY Of FRI[ NRKW6 DUcouni LIQUOR (WINE STORE $399 BODTCOORSieMILLER LITE 12 PACK Plus Many, Many, More Discounted Prices I "\ RETAIL JOSE CUERVO-GOLD .. Liter 8.95 JIM BEAM Liter 6.75 SEAGRAMS 7 CROWN .. Liter 6.95 SEAGRAMS V.O .. Liter 10.15 GILBEYSGIN Liter 6.65 EARLY TIMES Liter 6.69 J&B SCOTCH .. Liter 12.15 BACARDI RUM-SILVER.... .. Liter 6.55 POPOV VODKA .. Liter 4.89 SMIRNOFF VODKA .. Liter 6.29 JACK DANIELS .. Liter 9.65 CANADIAN CLUB .. Liter 10.99 CHRISTIAN BROS. BRANDY .. Liter 7.65 BLUE NUN .750 ML 4.45 Stop-N-io liquor RETAIL JIM BEAM.. 1.75L 11.90 SEAGRAMS 7 CROWN 1.7SL 12.15 SEAGRAMS V.O 1.75L 17.95 GILBEYSGIN 1.75L 11.65 J&B SCOTCH 1.75L 20.59 BACARDI RUM-SILVER 1.75L 11.19 POPOV VODKA 1.75L 8.99 SMIRNOFF VODKA 1.75L 10.89 JOSE CUERVO-WHITE 1.75L 14.05 KESSLER 1.75L 11.49 ALMADENMTNS 1.5L 4.35 CARLO ROSSI WINE 1.5L 2.89 GALLOWINE 1.5L 3.79 ANDRE CHAMPAGNE .. .Tr.750ML 2.65 EXPIRATION DATE 6-14-82 850 HORIZON HENDERSON Thursday, May 20, 1982 • % lienaeraon ttome i^cv aa owuiaei v/u> • < K M New Horizons Offers New Phase Lewis Homes Community The sixth successive phase of New Horizons has orficially opened for sales, announces Lewis Homes, developer of the popular Henderson community. The eleven new three and four bedroom Ihomes are priced ft"om the low $70,000s and are • available with 30-year. fixed rate VA, FHA or conventional financing at excellent below market interest rates. Home buytrs have been drawn to New Horizons by its tranquil hilltop surroundings, coupled with its nearness to an elementary school, public park and golf course all within easy walking distance. The homes are set on oversized, terraces lots overlooking the entire Las Vegas valley. Each of the three stylings in the new phase affbrds a full complement of quality construction features which has made Lewis Homes a consistent choice of new home buyers in the Las Vegas area for 20 years. New Horizons' floor plans, affording up to 1.733 square feet of living area, are enhanced by spacious family rooms, luxurious master bedroom suites and luminous • ceilinged kitchens. Well planned, for convenience and efficiency, the kitchens feature eye level ranges and ovens, dishwashers, pantries and instant hot water dispensers. Highlights of the various single story plans include handsome wood burning fireplaces with gas lot lighter, raised entries, cathedral ceilings and separate dining areas. Home seekers will be impressed with Lewis Homes' attention to detail and styling as they note ceiling lights in all bedrooms, decorative light fixtures, dual pane windows and Corian marble counter tops in each bathroom. Wall-to-wall carpeting beautifies living rooms, dining areas, hallways and all bedrooms and closets. Lewis Homes' regional sales manager, Doug Schroeder, suggested that buyers visit New Horizons now for best selection of location and floor plan styling. To reach the community, take Boulder Highway to Horizon Drive (just south of Henderson) and turn west (right) to the models, open daily from 10 i a.m. to 6 p.m. ••••••••••*•••*•*•••••• ^GRAND OPENING^ ^ CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS I 27 WATER ST. I Free Food b Refreshments I 6-8 PM THURS MAY 20tti ( BRING THE FAMILY ^ D. JIM JEINSEIN ^ t COINTY COMMISSIONER A" *'' [••••••••••••••••••••••* ^rm^-im^ Hrms Slate 'Concert of Caring' A major country music event, the "Concert of Caring" benefiting Southern California children with special developmental needs, seems to prove President Reagan's theory that corporate caring really does exist. For months, the two major companies who initiated the project the Los Angeles Division of Safeway and top country music radio station KLAC -have worked tirelessly with other "caring" companies to bring about the concert that will raise funds for summer camps, special training camps for the Special Olympics, and other much needed community services for the developmentally disabled children. Generously contributing time and services are A&L Awards, American Airlines, A-S-K Travel, Inc., Avis Rent A Car, Bristol Coach Limousines, CBS Records, Challenge Graphics, Editel, Electra Records, Fad Times, Fotoset Typographers, Jet Artierican Airlines, Ray M^ Johnson Studio, Long'Beach Arena, Madman Graphics, PSA. Airlines, Pacific Records, Scotti Brothers Records, Serigraphics, Sound Services, Inc., Warner Brothers Records, as well as all the performers. Scheduled for Sunday, May 23 at 7:00 p.m., in the Long Beach Arena, the "Concert of Caring" will star grammy winner, Dottie West and will be hosted by "Real People TV personality, Skip Stephenson, who will also perform with the many other "Country Music Stars Who Care". Dottie West headlines the show. Also appearing will be The Burrito Brothers, Lacy J. Dalton, the 1981-82 Academy of Country Awards Duo of the Year, David Frizzell and Shelly West, Doug Kershaw, Sylvia and "Dukes of Hazzard" Superstar Tom Wopat. Pat Boone will also perform as a special guest star. "We've kept the tickets priced so that the concert will be affordable", says Safeway Vice President Division Manager, Mr. Al Fulton, "and the 7:00 p.m. curtain times makes it a perfect family event." KLAC Vice President and General Manager, Don Kelly also stated, "Not in the last decade Transportation to Jean have you been able to go to a concert event like this for only $8.50$6.40, and the big thing is everybody wins." Tickets are on sale at the Long Beach Area Box Office, Mutual, Ticketron and Chargeline. Ticket discount coupons good for $2.50 off the $11.00 ticket and $1.00 off the $7.50 ticket, are available at all 158 L.A. Division Safeway Stores. Publicity and support has been strong for the event. President Reagan has already recognized this "private sector initiative" by sending a letter of appreciation to Mr. Fulton at Safeway thanking them and KLAC Metromedia Radio for caring. Friends Outside; a Volunteer, community service organization working with families of prisoners, offers free bus transportation to Southern Nevada Correctional Center at Jea^, Nevada every Saturday. For information and pick-up locations, call 735-1213. DonaJd J. Borgos an Aasbtaol Vice PrMident at Flrat Inlmtato Bank of Nevada, N.A., haa been named Bianch Manager at the bank'a Troplcana Center ofllee. Borgoa joined the bank'a Management IhUning program In 1970. He waa named Manager of the Weotland MaD (rfOce In 1974 and received an appointment aa Aaelatant Vice Preoldent in 1980. He la Vice Piealdent of the Nevada Safety ConncU, Treaaorer of the Weetland MaO Merchanta Aaaodatlon, and a member of the Red lock Optlmlat Qob, the Betlted OflBcera Aaaodatlon and the Air Force Aaaodatkm. OPENING MAY 17TH Little dealer little prices Authorized dealer Hoover-Eureka Rainbow FREE in home Rainbow Demonstration 331 S. Water St. Hend 565-7170 • y<<
PAGE 28

mm mm mmmmn 1^^ ?age 28 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Good News Story About Seniors list Announces Grant Thursday, May 20,1982 :z By Thomas W. Pauken Director of ACTION This is a good news story from Bryan, Texas, in Brazos County; the kind of story worth telling everywhere. Back in 1976, the Brazos County Senior Citizens Association was organized as a non-profit corporation whose purpose was fellowship, recreation, education and a place to outlaw loneliness. The problem was the association didn't really have a place it could call its own to do those things. More than that, it didn't have any money to buy or build one. That is until Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lester, well-known citizens in Bryan, stepped up and said, "I'll tell you what we're gonna to..." What they did was deed over an acre of land to the seniors, and everybody rightly thought that was a special kind of neighborlinegs. But that still didn't answer the problem of a gathering place. Well, the Lesters had an idea for that, too. They'd be willing to put up $50,000 for a building fund if the senior citizens would form a posse of sorts and ride out and lasso an equal amount of money on their own. And that's just what the elders of Bryan did. By letter, by telephone, on foot and maybe on horseback, and they had the money raised in less than two months. Well, they figured they had it made until they hired an architect to draw up plans for an activity center that would serve all the senior citizens in the county. Then they learned it would cost morethandouble of what they estimated. That riled them up but it didn't scare them off. They just went back to selling the idea everywhere they could until they had what they needed to start construction. Of course, they hadn i calculated that it would be necessary for them to build a street or pave a large parking area, but it was, and as Willie Bell Bogard, president of the association, says, "We had faith we could do it and we d^d it without any government money, but through the help of our local people." When it came to the cost of landscaping, which was estimated between Desert Chapter Na 22, Order of Eastern Star The homecoming of Worthy Grand M|tron, Lorraine Georgeson, was held at the Masonic Temple, Boulder City, on Saturday, the fifteenth of May. Worthy Grand Patron Stanley Williams, of Sunrise Chapter, Henderson, Nevada was also honored. Desert Chapter was the host Chapter, presided over by Worthy Matron Barbara Goodwin and Worthy Patron, Ted Goodwin. The organists for the day were Lucy Stockman and Carol Bourne. Visiting Grand Officers introduced and escorted to the East were: Marcia Bernard, Associate Grand Matron; Duane E. Berning, Associate Grand Patron; Julia W. Cox, Grand Treasurer, Lavona F. Nelson, Grand Conductress, Trude Davidson, Associate Grand Conductress, Madelaine Garrett, Grand Chaplain, Jada A. Kubic, Grand Marshal, Cheryll Butterman, Grand Org'anist, Barbara Jean Roberts, Grand Adah, Jeannine Digilio, Grand Esther, Virginia Houston, Grand Martha, Frances English, Grand Electa, Laverna Ware, Grand Warder Past Grand Matrons, es^iorted were: Iva Macdonald, and Jay Stone, General Grand Committee members; Mary White, Mary Oldham; Bunnie Harris, Helen Askew, Hazel Mae Tipton. Past Grand Patrons present were; John Pliant, Harry Overbey, Jim Ballantyne, Joe Eads, Marshall Page, and John Carr. The wife of the Worthy Grand Patron, Mary Williams, and the husband of the Worthy Grand Matron, Bob Georgeson were presented with gifts. Grand Representatives of other States in Nevada introduced and escorted were: Sylvia Laino, Clara Turner, Frances DeLoche, Mary Cockran, David Hamilton, Alger Bourne, Viola Heinle, Helen Pelham, Kitty Page, Lavon Kriss. Worthy Matrons from other Chapters present were: Johanna Hamilton, Mary Palmer, Harriett Jackson, Rose Dolosich, Helen Bates, Rita Dyscart. Masonic Dignitaries present were Joe Koterba and J. Names. The Rainbow Girls of Assembley No. 8, Boulder City gave an American Flag Presentation and honored the Worthy Grand Matron with a Monetary gift. Desert Chapter members put on a skit fctr Georgeson. A beautiful quilt with blocks made liy members of all the Chapters throughout the State was a gift for the W.G.M. The,quilt was put together by Kitty Page and Elizabeth Klein. "One of the best accomplithtnenU it making a long story short." Kin Hubbard HIGH RATES! Call the Money Desk at 734-8171 Jumbo Certificates $10,000 minimum -180 days 16.704% annual yield 15.35% annual rate Passbook Accounts No minimum balance! 9.526% annual yield 9.1% annual rate \=S: FIRST UNITED THMIFTr. LOAN 2575 Maryland Pkwy at Sahara 734-8171 $10,000 and $14,000, the seniors said that's far enough. We'll do that job ourselves. And, of course, they did. Today, Bogard declares, with justifiable pride, the association has the most modern and convenient facility of its kind in the State of Texas. It's commodious, it's heated, it's built of steel and brick. There's a meeting room that will seat 250, a large kitchen, two offices, four craft rooms, and a spacious lounge. Provisions have been made for handicapped seniors, and there's a gift shop where the members sell their craft items made at the center. Those sales along with bake sales and othet social affairs, keep the association in good financial health. During an average month, approximately one thousand senior.citizens of the county come to the center. As Bogard sums up the cooperative venture, "We saw a great need and did something about'it through our own efforts and determination and without federal assistance. We believe that what we did can be done throughoutour country if we are only willing to shoulder the responsibility and work together." Anyone for openers? Governor Robert List today announced a $350,000 federal grant to provide funding for approximately 250 jobs in the balance of state summer youth employment program. Low income youth, ages 14-21, will qualify for the 10-week jobs in 15 Nevada counties. All job sites will be in non-profit state and local agencies which will provide the participants with supervision and the opportunity to learn new and rewarding job skills. Ronald Hagerman Participates In Naval Exercise Navy Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Ronald R. Hagerman, whose wife, Helen, is the daughter of Helen Fitzpatrick of 1601 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, Nev., recently participated in exercise "Team Spirit 82*^ .in the Republic of Korea. He is a member of Patrol Squadron 46, based at Naval Air Station, Moffett Field, Calif., and currently deployed to Kadena Air Base, on Okinawa. "Team Spirit 82" was a joint exercise involving military forces from' the United States and the Republic of Korea More than 160,000 per sonnel and 31 U.S. 7th Fleet ships were involved in the month long exercise. After three weeks of training, "Team Spirit' culminated in a major amphibious assault exercise. Land, sea and air forces from both nations executed a vertical envelopment and an airborne paradrop to seize, occupy and defend exercise objectives. Hagerman joined the Navy in February 1968. Each participant will receive $3.35 per hour for a maximum of 35 hours' per week on the job site. A significant component of the governor's C.ET.A. summer youth program will include classroom instruction in jobseeking skills, career development and labor market orientation. Scheduled job sites will include park maintenance in Ely, forestry work and school clean-up in Carson City, clerical assistance in Fallon, and work for senior citizens in Winnemucca. "This grant will enable our youth to gain knowledge and job skills that will serve them as adults in the work force," the governor said. "It is a step forward in our efforts to strengthen job training and to battle unemp' loyment. For further information about program eligibility, contact the State C.E.T.A. office. Ill W. Telegraph Street, Carson City, Nevada 89701,885-4578. CSAA Membership & Services •Emergency Boad Service oAuto Insurance aHome Owners Insurance High-Limit Accident Insurance oAuto Financing •PLUS MUCH, MUCH MORE IV^ Call diariottt ot 870.9171 or 293-312) 'IVIEKm About half the population of America over the age of three wears glasses. Contributions to the Cancer Fund, the Heart Fund, The Estarl and RARA funds which had been raised by the Chapter during the year were made. A dinner was served in the dining room following the meeting. Decorations on the walls were decorations and emblems from all the Eastern Star Chapters in Nevada. The Past Matrons. Club had a luncheon for the Grand Officers in the Episcopal Church before the Homecoming. SERVING NEVADA SINCE 19fi6 YOUNG & RUE MOVINCTAND ST0iA6i CO, AGENTS FOR GLOBAL VAN LINES • *LOCAL MOVES *3T0RAGE *OUT-OF-STATE"MOVES • '^^CONTROLLED MOVES, ^ INTO NEVADA ~ I^WHEN IT'S YOUR MOVE—IT'S OUR~MOVI TOO! CALL 4574060 1624 MOJAVE RD., LAS VEGAS ?:^^^^I^H*S^^!5^llf*;^M*M^^SK? VCRSAILLCS THLATRE NAY 20 THRU JUi^E 2 DIMMER SHOW 8 PM • COCKTAIL SHOW 1 TOR RESCRVATIOMS 737-1755 OR 734-5301 t. W: fc m %^. H ^'*'*SK" i^^ In the Neonata* UnH m lufintse M'0s.pita* M'ediea'l te-nter, every m^i of modern science ^plus li^e spe'eial, l'0vi'n]g eare &i dedicated and ski'liled niarseS and physicians ^ gives very \ivv\%, babied a fagbting chance for a healthy, productive life. A few years ago,, most of t'hern would not have survived. Today they have a future. A-nd tiheir parents have peace of mind. Because of people who care, at the Southwest Neonatal Unit at Sunrise Hospital. We hope yo^ never ha-we to use it. But we though* stou'd like to know ^ it's here. Sunrfee Hospital MNlltal Cenier 3186 Mary-I'a(3 l > i|> wiH( ijfe sotfefas., H'^s^a fl-D9 / (7'2) 731 Si. • 4L t' • '. .^5 If 9 Thursday, May 20,1982 The Past In Pictures W^.HifRtiASW BOULDER BASIN • AS IT WAS! Visitors to tlie B.C. Library have the rare opportunity to see how the Boulder Basin loolied in 1930... before it was coirfered by the waters of Lake Mead. The masaic stretches ft'om Black Canyon to Boulder Canyon and was assembled by Pat Emery (shown pointing out a prominent feature on the huge photo). Many of the better known landmarks are numbered and identified to assist viewers in their visual travel. The exhibit leaves at the end of next week. Don't pass up this opportunity. Preserve Your Valuables On Video Tape PROFESSIONAL VIEW—Pat Gall (L) and Mary Chapman prepare to capture the contents of a home on videotape. It's but one of the services offered by Boulder City Video Productions. Your home is broken into ... precious heirlooms are stolen ... and the interior of the house turned upside Not a pleasant thought... but it's an occurence that could happen to you. Claims to your insurance carrier must be documented to recover the value of damage and the stolen items. Could you document a loss? Mary Chapman and Pat Gall provide a service that can prove invaluable should this or any other type of disaster strike. —It's a video taping service ... and it can record all of your precious possessions in sharp detail ... in true color ... and with the beneift of a descriptive sound track to point up detail. The completed cassette is preferably stored away from the residence in a safe depository. Mary and Pat know their stuff They work with thejiatest video equipment. Their camera's capable of zooming in tor extreme close-up (macro) detail to record I.D. numbers, etc., that may be needed. __ Videotaping allows an object to be closely examined from every angle. Video playback allows the picture to be frozen on the screen if desired. You certainly don't need to own a video recorder to take advantage of this modern service. The girls have the equipment necessary for you to view the tape as it is being made ... and to view the completed project, too. They're licensed and bonded ... and the tape is turned over to the client as soon as its completed. Calling themselves Boulder City Video Productions, the two gals offer a video session for any and all occasions ... from weddings to birthday parties to back yard barb-ques. Any special event is best preserved through the video formatT.. and Mary and Pat combine knowledge, creativity and expertise to turn out a winning package sure to please their customers. Why not give them a call today? You'll find the phone number in their ad elsewhere in today's NEWS. TUESDAY NIGHT 7:00 p.in. -i^ FAMILIES FOR CHRISt_„ with Doyle Brook I Invite you to their Home Meeting and Christian Fellowship 601 Kings Place at Ave. K B.C. Call 293-5397 4418 or 3769 JSo Creed But Christ No Book But The Bible iVo Law But Love Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 29 Boulder City Those who enjoy bicycling and wish to survive and continue enjoying the pasttime are given an opportunity to do themselves a favor. Saturday morning from 9 o'clock until noon the Lite-A-Bike Program will be conducted at the City Park at the corner of Sixth Street and Avenue B. This program, which has been fitred by the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States for a good many years, is designed to enhance the pleasure and promote the safety of bicycle riding for all residents, especially the younger members of our community. The basic purpose of the taping is to put reflective material on bicycles so that after sundown vehicle headlights immediately tell the driver, "Bicycle" in time to avoid accidents and fatalities. A secondary purpose is to provide safety training to improve the skill and longevity of all cyclists. Additionally, on Saturday a convenient opportunity will be provided by Boulder City police, for the usual $2 fee, to register any bike not already so registered. This is in compliance with existing ordinances. The real advantage is having the bike legally identifiable. This assists in returning it to its rightful owner when recovered following theft or loss. Bryan Boosters Plan Meet The Boulder City Boosters For Bryan For Governor will host a meeting in the First Western meeting room on May 27 at 7:30 p.m. The public is cordially invited to attend. The regular meeting of the Boulder City Chapter of the A. A.R.P. No. 809 will be held at the Senior Center on May 20th at 1 p.m. A short film will be shown. John Liveratti of the Senior Center will give a short talk about the progress of the Senior Center. The reflective material is placed on the bike in a uniform manner which is designed to provide the best identification to a vehicle driver, especially after dusk. A number of Junior Volunteer Firefighters will be present to assist the uniformed police afnd reserves and VFW members, all of whom are contributing to this community service. You must buy a reflective collar for your pet but safety devices for people are free from the Veterans of Foreign' Wars. There is no need to bring a penny to avail yourself, your grandchildren, or your grandparents of this service. The VFW does ask that you bring a clean bike in order that the tapes will adhere properly. Registration of bicycles is offered as a convenience by the Police ,-Bike This Saturday Dept. Bikes can and should be registered at the Police Dept. at any time. Registration is permanent unless ownership changes. Registration is then necessary. All bicycle owners are urged to come to the City Park, Sixth St. and Avenue B area, Saturday morning, 9 a.m. to noon, to have their bikes suitably taped for safe riding. NEVADA FIRST THR.FT .. .SAVINGS SUPPORT sgg3SN0>£i "*Z.NE PASSBOOK SAVINGS MAXI-T BILLINFn-IZ MOS.TNFTY-24MOS. I NFTY-30MOS. VARIABLE SAVINGS asii • Inltrttt OiHy and ComptuHtti Quatterfy • InKrest earns from Dale of Deposit to Date ol Withdrawal • Max Interest patd on ENTIRE AVEMOE MLANCEI N.F.T. OriolMtN IMS 9.31% SAVINGS JR Htnf ON AMOUNTS INTEREST RATE ANNUAL YiaO $10 7% 7.% $2SN 10 Sim* B% l.2>% •Mr S5000 9% 9.31%* The more you save, the Mflwr ti>e Mtreit paM tt ft* liwii fMT Hral S1.M et ifpMll." NEVADA FIRST h 5.158% mu $5,000 or more Effective from S-18-82-S-24-82 INTEREST PAID MONTHLY 6 MONTH MATURITY 14.197% ANNUAL RATE 15.251% TMie $3,000 or more Effective from S-lS-n--M-tt INTEREST PAID MONTHLY 12 MONTH MATURITY 14.278^' ANNUAL RATE 16.404% $2,000 or more Eff^Uve tmn S-lS---24-n i INTEREST PAID MONTHLY 24 MONTH MATURITY 15.216% ANNUAL RATE 16.495% 15.179 1 $1,000 or more Effective from V18-82--S4-82 INTEREST PAID MONTHLY M MONTX MATURITY 15.365% ANNUAL RATE LAS VEQAS • 415 E Carson • 382-162 LAS VCQA8 • 1566 E Flamingo • 731-2040 LAS VEQAS • 4665 Boulder Hwy. • 454-2622 US VEQAS • 6870 Spring Mountain Rd. at Rainbow • 362-7577 LAS VEQAS • Westland Mall • 4719 W. ClwlMlon • 678-1148 NO. LAS VEQAS • 2516 E Lake Mead Blvd. • 642-5431 HENDERSON • 65 W Lake Mead Or • 565-8967 e*N-s '^f'^ mu 9 MONTH MATURITY Efltctlve thru S/31/B2 • 14.215 ANNUAL RATE .. Only $1,000 Opens Your Account.A ravolutionarv idea in savings created by Nevada First Thrift VARIABLE SAVINGS CERTIFICATE LETS YOU TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF RISING INTEREST RATES IRA OVER 16% Wf KUEVE WE MY THE HI6HEST INTEREST ANYWHERE THRIFT ASSETS OVER $75,000,000.00 STATEWIDE ANU STRONG

PAGE 29

mm mm mmmmn 1^^ ?age 28 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Good News Story About Seniors list Announces Grant Thursday, May 20,1982 :z By Thomas W. Pauken Director of ACTION This is a good news story from Bryan, Texas, in Brazos County; the kind of story worth telling everywhere. Back in 1976, the Brazos County Senior Citizens Association was organized as a non-profit corporation whose purpose was fellowship, recreation, education and a place to outlaw loneliness. The problem was the association didn't really have a place it could call its own to do those things. More than that, it didn't have any money to buy or build one. That is until Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lester, well-known citizens in Bryan, stepped up and said, "I'll tell you what we're gonna to..." What they did was deed over an acre of land to the seniors, and everybody rightly thought that was a special kind of neighborlinegs. But that still didn't answer the problem of a gathering place. Well, the Lesters had an idea for that, too. They'd be willing to put up $50,000 for a building fund if the senior citizens would form a posse of sorts and ride out and lasso an equal amount of money on their own. And that's just what the elders of Bryan did. By letter, by telephone, on foot and maybe on horseback, and they had the money raised in less than two months. Well, they figured they had it made until they hired an architect to draw up plans for an activity center that would serve all the senior citizens in the county. Then they learned it would cost morethandouble of what they estimated. That riled them up but it didn't scare them off. They just went back to selling the idea everywhere they could until they had what they needed to start construction. Of course, they hadn i calculated that it would be necessary for them to build a street or pave a large parking area, but it was, and as Willie Bell Bogard, president of the association, says, "We had faith we could do it and we d^d it without any government money, but through the help of our local people." When it came to the cost of landscaping, which was estimated between Desert Chapter Na 22, Order of Eastern Star The homecoming of Worthy Grand M|tron, Lorraine Georgeson, was held at the Masonic Temple, Boulder City, on Saturday, the fifteenth of May. Worthy Grand Patron Stanley Williams, of Sunrise Chapter, Henderson, Nevada was also honored. Desert Chapter was the host Chapter, presided over by Worthy Matron Barbara Goodwin and Worthy Patron, Ted Goodwin. The organists for the day were Lucy Stockman and Carol Bourne. Visiting Grand Officers introduced and escorted to the East were: Marcia Bernard, Associate Grand Matron; Duane E. Berning, Associate Grand Patron; Julia W. Cox, Grand Treasurer, Lavona F. Nelson, Grand Conductress, Trude Davidson, Associate Grand Conductress, Madelaine Garrett, Grand Chaplain, Jada A. Kubic, Grand Marshal, Cheryll Butterman, Grand Org'anist, Barbara Jean Roberts, Grand Adah, Jeannine Digilio, Grand Esther, Virginia Houston, Grand Martha, Frances English, Grand Electa, Laverna Ware, Grand Warder Past Grand Matrons, es^iorted were: Iva Macdonald, and Jay Stone, General Grand Committee members; Mary White, Mary Oldham; Bunnie Harris, Helen Askew, Hazel Mae Tipton. Past Grand Patrons present were; John Pliant, Harry Overbey, Jim Ballantyne, Joe Eads, Marshall Page, and John Carr. The wife of the Worthy Grand Patron, Mary Williams, and the husband of the Worthy Grand Matron, Bob Georgeson were presented with gifts. Grand Representatives of other States in Nevada introduced and escorted were: Sylvia Laino, Clara Turner, Frances DeLoche, Mary Cockran, David Hamilton, Alger Bourne, Viola Heinle, Helen Pelham, Kitty Page, Lavon Kriss. Worthy Matrons from other Chapters present were: Johanna Hamilton, Mary Palmer, Harriett Jackson, Rose Dolosich, Helen Bates, Rita Dyscart. Masonic Dignitaries present were Joe Koterba and J. Names. The Rainbow Girls of Assembley No. 8, Boulder City gave an American Flag Presentation and honored the Worthy Grand Matron with a Monetary gift. Desert Chapter members put on a skit fctr Georgeson. A beautiful quilt with blocks made liy members of all the Chapters throughout the State was a gift for the W.G.M. The,quilt was put together by Kitty Page and Elizabeth Klein. "One of the best accomplithtnenU it making a long story short." Kin Hubbard HIGH RATES! Call the Money Desk at 734-8171 Jumbo Certificates $10,000 minimum -180 days 16.704% annual yield 15.35% annual rate Passbook Accounts No minimum balance! 9.526% annual yield 9.1% annual rate \=S: FIRST UNITED THMIFTr. LOAN 2575 Maryland Pkwy at Sahara 734-8171 $10,000 and $14,000, the seniors said that's far enough. We'll do that job ourselves. And, of course, they did. Today, Bogard declares, with justifiable pride, the association has the most modern and convenient facility of its kind in the State of Texas. It's commodious, it's heated, it's built of steel and brick. There's a meeting room that will seat 250, a large kitchen, two offices, four craft rooms, and a spacious lounge. Provisions have been made for handicapped seniors, and there's a gift shop where the members sell their craft items made at the center. Those sales along with bake sales and othet social affairs, keep the association in good financial health. During an average month, approximately one thousand senior.citizens of the county come to the center. As Bogard sums up the cooperative venture, "We saw a great need and did something about'it through our own efforts and determination and without federal assistance. We believe that what we did can be done throughoutour country if we are only willing to shoulder the responsibility and work together." Anyone for openers? Governor Robert List today announced a $350,000 federal grant to provide funding for approximately 250 jobs in the balance of state summer youth employment program. Low income youth, ages 14-21, will qualify for the 10-week jobs in 15 Nevada counties. All job sites will be in non-profit state and local agencies which will provide the participants with supervision and the opportunity to learn new and rewarding job skills. Ronald Hagerman Participates In Naval Exercise Navy Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Ronald R. Hagerman, whose wife, Helen, is the daughter of Helen Fitzpatrick of 1601 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, Nev., recently participated in exercise "Team Spirit 82*^ .in the Republic of Korea. He is a member of Patrol Squadron 46, based at Naval Air Station, Moffett Field, Calif., and currently deployed to Kadena Air Base, on Okinawa. "Team Spirit 82" was a joint exercise involving military forces from' the United States and the Republic of Korea More than 160,000 per sonnel and 31 U.S. 7th Fleet ships were involved in the month long exercise. After three weeks of training, "Team Spirit' culminated in a major amphibious assault exercise. Land, sea and air forces from both nations executed a vertical envelopment and an airborne paradrop to seize, occupy and defend exercise objectives. Hagerman joined the Navy in February 1968. Each participant will receive $3.35 per hour for a maximum of 35 hours' per week on the job site. A significant component of the governor's C.ET.A. summer youth program will include classroom instruction in jobseeking skills, career development and labor market orientation. Scheduled job sites will include park maintenance in Ely, forestry work and school clean-up in Carson City, clerical assistance in Fallon, and work for senior citizens in Winnemucca. "This grant will enable our youth to gain knowledge and job skills that will serve them as adults in the work force," the governor said. "It is a step forward in our efforts to strengthen job training and to battle unemp' loyment. For further information about program eligibility, contact the State C.E.T.A. office. Ill W. Telegraph Street, Carson City, Nevada 89701,885-4578. CSAA Membership & Services •Emergency Boad Service oAuto Insurance aHome Owners Insurance High-Limit Accident Insurance oAuto Financing •PLUS MUCH, MUCH MORE IV^ Call diariottt ot 870.9171 or 293-312) 'IVIEKm About half the population of America over the age of three wears glasses. Contributions to the Cancer Fund, the Heart Fund, The Estarl and RARA funds which had been raised by the Chapter during the year were made. A dinner was served in the dining room following the meeting. Decorations on the walls were decorations and emblems from all the Eastern Star Chapters in Nevada. The Past Matrons. Club had a luncheon for the Grand Officers in the Episcopal Church before the Homecoming. SERVING NEVADA SINCE 19fi6 YOUNG & RUE MOVINCTAND ST0iA6i CO, AGENTS FOR GLOBAL VAN LINES • *LOCAL MOVES *3T0RAGE *OUT-OF-STATE"MOVES • '^^CONTROLLED MOVES, ^ INTO NEVADA ~ I^WHEN IT'S YOUR MOVE—IT'S OUR~MOVI TOO! CALL 4574060 1624 MOJAVE RD., LAS VEGAS ?:^^^^I^H*S^^!5^llf*;^M*M^^SK? VCRSAILLCS THLATRE NAY 20 THRU JUi^E 2 DIMMER SHOW 8 PM • COCKTAIL SHOW 1 TOR RESCRVATIOMS 737-1755 OR 734-5301 t. W: fc m %^. H ^'*'*SK" i^^ In the Neonata* UnH m lufintse M'0s.pita* M'ediea'l te-nter, every m^i of modern science ^plus li^e spe'eial, l'0vi'n]g eare &i dedicated and ski'liled niarseS and physicians ^ gives very \ivv\%, babied a fagbting chance for a healthy, productive life. A few years ago,, most of t'hern would not have survived. Today they have a future. A-nd tiheir parents have peace of mind. Because of people who care, at the Southwest Neonatal Unit at Sunrise Hospital. We hope yo^ never ha-we to use it. But we though* stou'd like to know ^ it's here. Sunrfee Hospital MNlltal Cenier 3186 Mary-I'a(3 l > i|> wiH( ijfe sotfefas., H'^s^a fl-D9 / (7'2) 731 Si. • 4L t' • '. .^5 If 9 Thursday, May 20,1982 The Past In Pictures W^.HifRtiASW BOULDER BASIN • AS IT WAS! Visitors to tlie B.C. Library have the rare opportunity to see how the Boulder Basin loolied in 1930... before it was coirfered by the waters of Lake Mead. The masaic stretches ft'om Black Canyon to Boulder Canyon and was assembled by Pat Emery (shown pointing out a prominent feature on the huge photo). Many of the better known landmarks are numbered and identified to assist viewers in their visual travel. The exhibit leaves at the end of next week. Don't pass up this opportunity. Preserve Your Valuables On Video Tape PROFESSIONAL VIEW—Pat Gall (L) and Mary Chapman prepare to capture the contents of a home on videotape. It's but one of the services offered by Boulder City Video Productions. Your home is broken into ... precious heirlooms are stolen ... and the interior of the house turned upside Not a pleasant thought... but it's an occurence that could happen to you. Claims to your insurance carrier must be documented to recover the value of damage and the stolen items. Could you document a loss? Mary Chapman and Pat Gall provide a service that can prove invaluable should this or any other type of disaster strike. —It's a video taping service ... and it can record all of your precious possessions in sharp detail ... in true color ... and with the beneift of a descriptive sound track to point up detail. The completed cassette is preferably stored away from the residence in a safe depository. Mary and Pat know their stuff They work with thejiatest video equipment. Their camera's capable of zooming in tor extreme close-up (macro) detail to record I.D. numbers, etc., that may be needed. __ Videotaping allows an object to be closely examined from every angle. Video playback allows the picture to be frozen on the screen if desired. You certainly don't need to own a video recorder to take advantage of this modern service. The girls have the equipment necessary for you to view the tape as it is being made ... and to view the completed project, too. They're licensed and bonded ... and the tape is turned over to the client as soon as its completed. Calling themselves Boulder City Video Productions, the two gals offer a video session for any and all occasions ... from weddings to birthday parties to back yard barb-ques. Any special event is best preserved through the video formatT.. and Mary and Pat combine knowledge, creativity and expertise to turn out a winning package sure to please their customers. Why not give them a call today? You'll find the phone number in their ad elsewhere in today's NEWS. TUESDAY NIGHT 7:00 p.in. -i^ FAMILIES FOR CHRISt_„ with Doyle Brook I Invite you to their Home Meeting and Christian Fellowship 601 Kings Place at Ave. K B.C. Call 293-5397 4418 or 3769 JSo Creed But Christ No Book But The Bible iVo Law But Love Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 29 Boulder City Those who enjoy bicycling and wish to survive and continue enjoying the pasttime are given an opportunity to do themselves a favor. Saturday morning from 9 o'clock until noon the Lite-A-Bike Program will be conducted at the City Park at the corner of Sixth Street and Avenue B. This program, which has been fitred by the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States for a good many years, is designed to enhance the pleasure and promote the safety of bicycle riding for all residents, especially the younger members of our community. The basic purpose of the taping is to put reflective material on bicycles so that after sundown vehicle headlights immediately tell the driver, "Bicycle" in time to avoid accidents and fatalities. A secondary purpose is to provide safety training to improve the skill and longevity of all cyclists. Additionally, on Saturday a convenient opportunity will be provided by Boulder City police, for the usual $2 fee, to register any bike not already so registered. This is in compliance with existing ordinances. The real advantage is having the bike legally identifiable. This assists in returning it to its rightful owner when recovered following theft or loss. Bryan Boosters Plan Meet The Boulder City Boosters For Bryan For Governor will host a meeting in the First Western meeting room on May 27 at 7:30 p.m. The public is cordially invited to attend. The regular meeting of the Boulder City Chapter of the A. A.R.P. No. 809 will be held at the Senior Center on May 20th at 1 p.m. A short film will be shown. John Liveratti of the Senior Center will give a short talk about the progress of the Senior Center. The reflective material is placed on the bike in a uniform manner which is designed to provide the best identification to a vehicle driver, especially after dusk. A number of Junior Volunteer Firefighters will be present to assist the uniformed police afnd reserves and VFW members, all of whom are contributing to this community service. You must buy a reflective collar for your pet but safety devices for people are free from the Veterans of Foreign' Wars. There is no need to bring a penny to avail yourself, your grandchildren, or your grandparents of this service. The VFW does ask that you bring a clean bike in order that the tapes will adhere properly. Registration of bicycles is offered as a convenience by the Police ,-Bike This Saturday Dept. Bikes can and should be registered at the Police Dept. at any time. Registration is permanent unless ownership changes. Registration is then necessary. All bicycle owners are urged to come to the City Park, Sixth St. and Avenue B area, Saturday morning, 9 a.m. to noon, to have their bikes suitably taped for safe riding. NEVADA FIRST THR.FT .. .SAVINGS SUPPORT sgg3SN0>£i "*Z.NE PASSBOOK SAVINGS MAXI-T BILLINFn-IZ MOS.TNFTY-24MOS. I NFTY-30MOS. VARIABLE SAVINGS asii • Inltrttt OiHy and ComptuHtti Quatterfy • InKrest earns from Dale of Deposit to Date ol Withdrawal • Max Interest patd on ENTIRE AVEMOE MLANCEI N.F.T. OriolMtN IMS 9.31% SAVINGS JR Htnf ON AMOUNTS INTEREST RATE ANNUAL YiaO $10 7% 7.% $2SN 10 Sim* B% l.2>% •Mr S5000 9% 9.31%* The more you save, the Mflwr ti>e Mtreit paM tt ft* liwii fMT Hral S1.M et ifpMll." NEVADA FIRST h 5.158% mu $5,000 or more Effective from S-18-82-S-24-82 INTEREST PAID MONTHLY 6 MONTH MATURITY 14.197% ANNUAL RATE 15.251% TMie $3,000 or more Effective from S-lS-n--M-tt INTEREST PAID MONTHLY 12 MONTH MATURITY 14.278^' ANNUAL RATE 16.404% $2,000 or more Eff^Uve tmn S-lS---24-n i INTEREST PAID MONTHLY 24 MONTH MATURITY 15.216% ANNUAL RATE 16.495% 15.179 1 $1,000 or more Effective from V18-82--S4-82 INTEREST PAID MONTHLY M MONTX MATURITY 15.365% ANNUAL RATE LAS VEQAS • 415 E Carson • 382-162 LAS VCQA8 • 1566 E Flamingo • 731-2040 LAS VEQAS • 4665 Boulder Hwy. • 454-2622 US VEQAS • 6870 Spring Mountain Rd. at Rainbow • 362-7577 LAS VEQAS • Westland Mall • 4719 W. ClwlMlon • 678-1148 NO. LAS VEQAS • 2516 E Lake Mead Blvd. • 642-5431 HENDERSON • 65 W Lake Mead Or • 565-8967 e*N-s '^f'^ mu 9 MONTH MATURITY Efltctlve thru S/31/B2 • 14.215 ANNUAL RATE .. Only $1,000 Opens Your Account.A ravolutionarv idea in savings created by Nevada First Thrift VARIABLE SAVINGS CERTIFICATE LETS YOU TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF RISING INTEREST RATES IRA OVER 16% Wf KUEVE WE MY THE HI6HEST INTEREST ANYWHERE THRIFT ASSETS OVER $75,000,000.00 STATEWIDE ANU STRONG

PAGE 30

i^^ w^^ Page 30 He nderson Home News and Boulder City News MI|HAJI:l:VI^IMi'l1ifTTTMrTV{*{lll! inurbaay, may cu, iv^ Thursday, May 20,1982 WHITEWALL GLASS BELTED RADIALS 99 STEEL RADIAL WHITEWALLS P15580R/13 F.E.T. 1J44 to 1 Si SIZE 1 PRICE i P16580R/13 1 29.991 P17580R/13 34.991 P18580R/13 36.991 P18575R/14 39.99 Pt9575Ryi4 39.99 1 P20575R/14 39.99 P21575R/14 44.<9 IP20575R/15 1 44.99 P21575R/16 47.99 P22575R/15 47.991 P23575R/15 47.99 BLACKWALL METRIC STEEL RADIALS 70 SERIES 99 165/70R-13 F.E.T. 145 to 2.18 [SIZE PRICEl 175/70R-13 35.99 185/70R-.13 37.99 h85/70R-14 39.99 Il95/70R-14 42.991 ROAD HUGGER BELTED RWL 33 99 A70-13 FET 1.79 to 3.43 SIZE PRICEl D70-14 38 99 E70-14 39,99 F70-14 40 99 G70-14 42 99 G70-15 42 99 H70-15 44.991 B60-13 41.99 F60-14 43 99 Q60-14 46 991 L60-14 5199 G60-15 46 99 L60-15 53 991 CUSTOM WHEELS 4^ SPOKE WHEELS CHROME ^ $0799 1436 ^ / $9Q99 15x8 ^\J WHITE 14x6 15x8 $-| 799 $-rQ99^ MODULAR WHEELS CHROME $2999 $3599 14x6 15x8 14x6 GOLD 99 15x8 Excluding Cap & Lug ^4uts 29 35 99 TRAILER TIRES 99 480X8/4 T.U. FET .63^1.3(r SIZE PRICE • 570-8/4TU 18.99 : 480-12/4 530-12/4 18.99 19.99 S BLACKWALL METRIC FABRIC RADIAL TRUCK RV TIRES njm SIZE PRICEl 145R-13 26.99 mTW 155R-13 27.99 155R-12 165R-13 29.99 F.E.T. 1.37 to 1.78 165R-14 29.991 • 175R-14 33.99 165R-15 33.991 27850-14/6 FET 3.16 to 5.61 ^'^ • ^: SIZE iPRiCEl 5 L70-15/4 51.99 ;: 10-15/4 57.99 • 11-15/4 65.99 ^ 11-15/6 71.99 12-15/6 69.99 • ''>,*^:^M^ HIGHWAY TRUCK TIRES 700X15/6 T.T. FEt 2.81 to 5.70 SIZE PRICE 700x15/8 T.U. 49.99 1700x15/6 T.U. 45.991 750X16/8 T.T. 56.99 1H78X15/6 59.99 180016-5/6 54.99 80016-5/8 59.99 87516-5/8 66.99 95016-5/8 69.99 10X16-5/8 71.991 1 12x16-5/8 di.dd RADIAL TRUCK RV TIRES 27850R-14 FET 3.06 to 6.49 ISIZE PRICE 30-950R-15 84.99 pi-1050R-15 94.99 32-1150R-15 104.99 33-1250R-15 114.99 31-1050R-165 114.99 33-126R-16.5 129.991 t HOURS: MON-FRI 8:30-6 SAT. 8:30-5 ASK ABOUT OUR I FREE REPLACEMENT CERTIFICAn m^M • FREE MOUNTING • FREE ROTATIONS 916 Nevada Hwy. 293-3593 1411 N. Eastern 642-7959 Boulder City Las Vegas TIRE OF NEV. INC. 4881 Flamingo & Boulder Hwy. 451-1453 Nvada Cotorado Michigan Indiana Arizona Texas f4ew Mexico 350 N. Boulder 3440 Spring Mtn. 565-8874 876-9226 lY.yy.iiit Las Vegas :i4'fiy^L'rf.TCTipn Henderson Lss Vegas LIU. i^'#,iT^i:r—.iv^<.ni.iaWlMInT7i i HAPPY BIRTHDAY There was a party at Sam's Town Western Emporium. It was Sam Boyd's 72nd birthday, and on hand to celebrate were Solo Velez, left, assistant manager to the Western Emporium, and Perry Whitt, center, executive vice-president and chief operating officer. Open House Honors Stout Ann'tversary Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 31 Dollars and Sense of Year Round Schools By Earl T. Busard This is the eighth and final in a series of articles written by Earl T. Busard Former Director of Business and Finance for the Northville Public Schools (1967-1975) a Detroit suburb that initiated a 45-15 Year Round Jpchool Program in 1972 and co-author of "Year Round School Is It Feasible? Is It Acceptable?" published for the Department of Education and Welfare 1971-73. The over riding objective of these articles has been to attempt to stimulate (1;) Interest in ESY Year Round School and (2) to try and convince the Clark County School Turstees that the people of Clark County are concerned enough that information on viable alterna. tives to the constant demand for more funds must be explored and information given to us. Well, on Wednesday, April 21,1982, at the request of the Year Round School Committ tee of Tomiyasu K Elementary School I • appeared before the • Clark County School I Trustees and made the I following request: I "Your year round I school committee respectively requestj^ that in as much as no in depth,study of the day to day TRUE operational cost savings of year round school in addition to the well publicized and accepted capital outlay savings (I estimate in excess of $400 million) have been done and little or no financial savings or other information on the 45-15 plan in Clark County are currently available, that the Board of Trustees name a formalcitizens financial analysis committee with the delegation to receive the necessary information from various departments to provide you and Clark County with a true in depth picture of the operational and construction "Dollars and Sense Savings" available under a 45-15 plan. BE IT IMPLEMENTED PARTIALLY OR TOTALLY IN THE COUNTY. I Stand Ready to Assist Wherever Requested. We need to clarify for instance the MisStatement in Clark County Publication on Year Round School. The statement is ~ that utilization of a facility increases by 25% when converted to year round school. The fact is the increase is Onethird 33 and one-third%. Transportation Costs Fringe Benefits, Administration, Equipment, Cafeteria, Custodial, etc. are all reduced per pupil under a 45-15 Plan. But. NO STUDY HAS BEEN DONE HERE TO BRING FORT H THESE FACTS. We feel VERY STRONGLY that if the Board is going to provide our demanding taxpayers a true picture of year round school, it should start with a true cost picture. We in Michigan validated a minimum 5% operational cost savings under a 45-15 plan with a partial implementation I'm sure it would show as much or better here with a full or partiaLplan. Thank you very much on behalf of the Year Round School Committee, we await your direction." As a courtesy a motion to form the Committee was made by a Trustee and quickly voted down on the basis it was a JOB FOR THE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND THEY DIDN'T NEED ANY HELP. Several days later an article appeared in our good Henderson Home News to the effect that a Dr. Ronald Hawley of the Clark County School Administration is heading a study on costs of year round school operation. At LAST a move from dead center -what it will come to we can only wait and see. I don't wish to take credit for getting the study going but I think our prodding didn't hurt. I regret the exclusion of the public because a CLOSED ADMINISTRATIVE CONDUCTED STUDY WILL, I'M AFRAID ONLY REFLECT THE ADMINISTRATIONS ATTITUDE ON YEAR ROUND SCHOOL -NEGATIVE. I shall reserve any further comments until the "study" is nriade public. I wish to express my appreciation for all of your support and comments, it has been a real treat for me. In 1973, the average new car 90t'l4 milei'to the gallon. In 1978, the average new car got 18 miles to the gallon. An Open House will be held honoring the 50th Wedding Anniversary of Chester La Von and Pearl Stout at the 2nd Ward Chapel in Hurricane, Utah, on May 29,1982, from 6 to 8 p.m. They were married on May 25, 1932 in the L.D.S. St. George Temple. The first part of their married years were ,spent in Utah where Stout owned and operated sawmills. In 1954, they moved to Las Vegs where he was a plumber pipefitter. Mrs. Stout worked 18 years as an operator with the telephone company here. They had seven children, John LaVon. Larry Wayne, Darwin K., Brian L., Ruth (died Bahal Anniversary On May 23, the Baha'is of Boulder City will join Baha'is in more than 330 countries and territories around the world in observing-the 139th Anniversary of the Declaration of the Bab, the Prophet Forerunner of the Baha'i Faith. This anniversary is one of nine Holy Days on which Baha'is suspend work each year. The Boulder City Baha'i community's celebration of the Declaration of the Bab will be held at the home of Maxine and Billy Grainger, 1517 Dorothy Drive on Saturday, May 22 at 9:30 p.m. and will include a slide show on the life of the Bab, as well as refreshments. The event is open to the general public. There is never any charge or collection at Baha'i meetings. 48th ANNUAL HELLDOSADO iSPONSOREDB^ ^ELKS LODGE #1468 MAY 28-JUNE 6 LAS VEGAS CONVENTION CENTER 9 PERFORMANCES, 8 P.M. Nightly > Championship Rodeo Exhibits • Carnival • Parade TICKETS ON SALE May 17th-thru June 6j Las Vegas Convention Center A// Seats Reserved ELKS HELLDORADO CHAMPIONSHIP FINALS TO BE NATIONALLY TELEVISED SUNDAY. JUNE 6 8 P.M. SHOW • *7, *9, M 1> *5 *7 *l EXCEPT SUND/Cf FINALS BUY YOURS NOW FOR ^ FABULOUS FAMILY FUN! Vi ADMISSION FREE TO FAIR EXHIBITS AND CARNIVAL MIDWAY ^ODl\ '%''*'"*S2L'^% in infancy). Mrs. William E. Boyle Jr. (Judy) and Mrs. Ralph Roger Hillman (Janice); 28 grandchildren and six great grandchildren. They have been active in the L.D.S. Church, each holding various positions of service. They are now retired and living in Hurricane, Utah. ALTERATIONS IM a;i 2x^1 PLANT Kl\(. lOdlS Tare Irce C kiiiurs HBWOERSON oniMif'no 60U1DERI3TY iwnrai rwu El Patio (Rnest Mexican Restaurant) is proud ID announoe our DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS ^^ for the working person Z./3 XX COMING SOON WEBCEND MEXICAN BUffET SENIOR CITIZEN'S 25% Discount >UNDAY-MONDAY-TUESOAY h WEDNESDAY! J^^'l^k Thanks to al our customers for your patronage ii<'i> >j*.>i^iUA Z MON-SAT ^ 11 a.m. to 9 p.in. SUNDAY '11 q.m. to 8 p.m'. 1101 ARIZONA! 294-0018 I THnnj iMiiiBl

PAGE 31

i^^ w^^ Page 30 He nderson Home News and Boulder City News MI|HAJI:l:VI^IMi'l1ifTTTMrTV{*{lll! inurbaay, may cu, iv^ Thursday, May 20,1982 WHITEWALL GLASS BELTED RADIALS 99 STEEL RADIAL WHITEWALLS P15580R/13 F.E.T. 1J44 to 1 Si SIZE 1 PRICE i P16580R/13 1 29.991 P17580R/13 34.991 P18580R/13 36.991 P18575R/14 39.99 Pt9575Ryi4 39.99 1 P20575R/14 39.99 P21575R/14 44.<9 IP20575R/15 1 44.99 P21575R/16 47.99 P22575R/15 47.991 P23575R/15 47.99 BLACKWALL METRIC STEEL RADIALS 70 SERIES 99 165/70R-13 F.E.T. 145 to 2.18 [SIZE PRICEl 175/70R-13 35.99 185/70R-.13 37.99 h85/70R-14 39.99 Il95/70R-14 42.991 ROAD HUGGER BELTED RWL 33 99 A70-13 FET 1.79 to 3.43 SIZE PRICEl D70-14 38 99 E70-14 39,99 F70-14 40 99 G70-14 42 99 G70-15 42 99 H70-15 44.991 B60-13 41.99 F60-14 43 99 Q60-14 46 991 L60-14 5199 G60-15 46 99 L60-15 53 991 CUSTOM WHEELS 4^ SPOKE WHEELS CHROME ^ $0799 1436 ^ / $9Q99 15x8 ^\J WHITE 14x6 15x8 $-| 799 $-rQ99^ MODULAR WHEELS CHROME $2999 $3599 14x6 15x8 14x6 GOLD 99 15x8 Excluding Cap & Lug ^4uts 29 35 99 TRAILER TIRES 99 480X8/4 T.U. FET .63^1.3(r SIZE PRICE • 570-8/4TU 18.99 : 480-12/4 530-12/4 18.99 19.99 S BLACKWALL METRIC FABRIC RADIAL TRUCK RV TIRES njm SIZE PRICEl 145R-13 26.99 mTW 155R-13 27.99 155R-12 165R-13 29.99 F.E.T. 1.37 to 1.78 165R-14 29.991 • 175R-14 33.99 165R-15 33.991 27850-14/6 FET 3.16 to 5.61 ^'^ • ^: SIZE iPRiCEl 5 L70-15/4 51.99 ;: 10-15/4 57.99 • 11-15/4 65.99 ^ 11-15/6 71.99 12-15/6 69.99 • ''>,*^:^M^ HIGHWAY TRUCK TIRES 700X15/6 T.T. FEt 2.81 to 5.70 SIZE PRICE 700x15/8 T.U. 49.99 1700x15/6 T.U. 45.991 750X16/8 T.T. 56.99 1H78X15/6 59.99 180016-5/6 54.99 80016-5/8 59.99 87516-5/8 66.99 95016-5/8 69.99 10X16-5/8 71.991 1 12x16-5/8 di.dd RADIAL TRUCK RV TIRES 27850R-14 FET 3.06 to 6.49 ISIZE PRICE 30-950R-15 84.99 pi-1050R-15 94.99 32-1150R-15 104.99 33-1250R-15 114.99 31-1050R-165 114.99 33-126R-16.5 129.991 t HOURS: MON-FRI 8:30-6 SAT. 8:30-5 ASK ABOUT OUR I FREE REPLACEMENT CERTIFICAn m^M • FREE MOUNTING • FREE ROTATIONS 916 Nevada Hwy. 293-3593 1411 N. Eastern 642-7959 Boulder City Las Vegas TIRE OF NEV. INC. 4881 Flamingo & Boulder Hwy. 451-1453 Nvada Cotorado Michigan Indiana Arizona Texas f4ew Mexico 350 N. Boulder 3440 Spring Mtn. 565-8874 876-9226 lY.yy.iiit Las Vegas :i4'fiy^L'rf.TCTipn Henderson Lss Vegas LIU. i^'#,iT^i:r—.iv^<.ni.iaWlMInT7i i HAPPY BIRTHDAY There was a party at Sam's Town Western Emporium. It was Sam Boyd's 72nd birthday, and on hand to celebrate were Solo Velez, left, assistant manager to the Western Emporium, and Perry Whitt, center, executive vice-president and chief operating officer. Open House Honors Stout Ann'tversary Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 31 Dollars and Sense of Year Round Schools By Earl T. Busard This is the eighth and final in a series of articles written by Earl T. Busard Former Director of Business and Finance for the Northville Public Schools (1967-1975) a Detroit suburb that initiated a 45-15 Year Round Jpchool Program in 1972 and co-author of "Year Round School Is It Feasible? Is It Acceptable?" published for the Department of Education and Welfare 1971-73. The over riding objective of these articles has been to attempt to stimulate (1;) Interest in ESY Year Round School and (2) to try and convince the Clark County School Turstees that the people of Clark County are concerned enough that information on viable alterna. tives to the constant demand for more funds must be explored and information given to us. Well, on Wednesday, April 21,1982, at the request of the Year Round School Committ tee of Tomiyasu K Elementary School I • appeared before the • Clark County School I Trustees and made the I following request: I "Your year round I school committee respectively requestj^ that in as much as no in depth,study of the day to day TRUE operational cost savings of year round school in addition to the well publicized and accepted capital outlay savings (I estimate in excess of $400 million) have been done and little or no financial savings or other information on the 45-15 plan in Clark County are currently available, that the Board of Trustees name a formalcitizens financial analysis committee with the delegation to receive the necessary information from various departments to provide you and Clark County with a true in depth picture of the operational and construction "Dollars and Sense Savings" available under a 45-15 plan. BE IT IMPLEMENTED PARTIALLY OR TOTALLY IN THE COUNTY. I Stand Ready to Assist Wherever Requested. We need to clarify for instance the MisStatement in Clark County Publication on Year Round School. The statement is ~ that utilization of a facility increases by 25% when converted to year round school. The fact is the increase is Onethird 33 and one-third%. Transportation Costs Fringe Benefits, Administration, Equipment, Cafeteria, Custodial, etc. are all reduced per pupil under a 45-15 Plan. But. NO STUDY HAS BEEN DONE HERE TO BRING FORT H THESE FACTS. We feel VERY STRONGLY that if the Board is going to provide our demanding taxpayers a true picture of year round school, it should start with a true cost picture. We in Michigan validated a minimum 5% operational cost savings under a 45-15 plan with a partial implementation I'm sure it would show as much or better here with a full or partiaLplan. Thank you very much on behalf of the Year Round School Committee, we await your direction." As a courtesy a motion to form the Committee was made by a Trustee and quickly voted down on the basis it was a JOB FOR THE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND THEY DIDN'T NEED ANY HELP. Several days later an article appeared in our good Henderson Home News to the effect that a Dr. Ronald Hawley of the Clark County School Administration is heading a study on costs of year round school operation. At LAST a move from dead center -what it will come to we can only wait and see. I don't wish to take credit for getting the study going but I think our prodding didn't hurt. I regret the exclusion of the public because a CLOSED ADMINISTRATIVE CONDUCTED STUDY WILL, I'M AFRAID ONLY REFLECT THE ADMINISTRATIONS ATTITUDE ON YEAR ROUND SCHOOL -NEGATIVE. I shall reserve any further comments until the "study" is nriade public. I wish to express my appreciation for all of your support and comments, it has been a real treat for me. In 1973, the average new car 90t'l4 milei'to the gallon. In 1978, the average new car got 18 miles to the gallon. An Open House will be held honoring the 50th Wedding Anniversary of Chester La Von and Pearl Stout at the 2nd Ward Chapel in Hurricane, Utah, on May 29,1982, from 6 to 8 p.m. They were married on May 25, 1932 in the L.D.S. St. George Temple. The first part of their married years were ,spent in Utah where Stout owned and operated sawmills. In 1954, they moved to Las Vegs where he was a plumber pipefitter. Mrs. Stout worked 18 years as an operator with the telephone company here. They had seven children, John LaVon. Larry Wayne, Darwin K., Brian L., Ruth (died Bahal Anniversary On May 23, the Baha'is of Boulder City will join Baha'is in more than 330 countries and territories around the world in observing-the 139th Anniversary of the Declaration of the Bab, the Prophet Forerunner of the Baha'i Faith. This anniversary is one of nine Holy Days on which Baha'is suspend work each year. The Boulder City Baha'i community's celebration of the Declaration of the Bab will be held at the home of Maxine and Billy Grainger, 1517 Dorothy Drive on Saturday, May 22 at 9:30 p.m. and will include a slide show on the life of the Bab, as well as refreshments. The event is open to the general public. There is never any charge or collection at Baha'i meetings. 48th ANNUAL HELLDOSADO iSPONSOREDB^ ^ELKS LODGE #1468 MAY 28-JUNE 6 LAS VEGAS CONVENTION CENTER 9 PERFORMANCES, 8 P.M. Nightly > Championship Rodeo Exhibits • Carnival • Parade TICKETS ON SALE May 17th-thru June 6j Las Vegas Convention Center A// Seats Reserved ELKS HELLDORADO CHAMPIONSHIP FINALS TO BE NATIONALLY TELEVISED SUNDAY. JUNE 6 8 P.M. SHOW • *7, *9, M 1> *5 *7 *l EXCEPT SUND/Cf FINALS BUY YOURS NOW FOR ^ FABULOUS FAMILY FUN! Vi ADMISSION FREE TO FAIR EXHIBITS AND CARNIVAL MIDWAY ^ODl\ '%''*'"*S2L'^% in infancy). Mrs. William E. Boyle Jr. (Judy) and Mrs. Ralph Roger Hillman (Janice); 28 grandchildren and six great grandchildren. They have been active in the L.D.S. Church, each holding various positions of service. They are now retired and living in Hurricane, Utah. ALTERATIONS IM a;i 2x^1 PLANT Kl\(. lOdlS Tare Irce C kiiiurs HBWOERSON oniMif'no 60U1DERI3TY iwnrai rwu El Patio (Rnest Mexican Restaurant) is proud ID announoe our DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS ^^ for the working person Z./3 XX COMING SOON WEBCEND MEXICAN BUffET SENIOR CITIZEN'S 25% Discount >UNDAY-MONDAY-TUESOAY h WEDNESDAY! J^^'l^k Thanks to al our customers for your patronage ii<'i> >j*.>i^iUA Z MON-SAT ^ 11 a.m. to 9 p.in. SUNDAY '11 q.m. to 8 p.m'. 1101 ARIZONA! 294-0018 I THnnj iMiiiBl

PAGE 32

IUU*aW>. AM^ mv, AftOti 1 v •<• vut,vu nuiuv i^ewa -" u^u*uc> v/.*^ nvwj "starve'up" before fit with a un\que**deminute of your visit ... tunes of the 40's. Thursday, May 20,1982 The Botding Plant and a Conversation With Bernadine Nicolson Loren and Bernadine Nicolson by Bill Harbour Take a nostalgic step back in time., at The Bottling Plant in Boulder City. Remember the corner drug store with its soda fountain ... offering afternoon delights such as flavored cokes with a dash of vanilla, lemon, or syrup of your choice? There Were phosphates .. chocolate egg creams ... and rich, thick malts and shakes to quench the thirst and satisfy the soul. On those days when the wallet had a bit of a bulge, the fountain menu offered extravagant delights such as sundaes, sodas and (kingof them all) njultiflavored banana splits ... running over with tasty toppings. All this ... and the atmosphere that surrounds it... is till alive and well at The Bottling Plant. Loren and Bernadine Nicolson are the owner operators of the enticing facility ... and this warm friendly couple really go out of their way to insure that each and every visitor feels right at home. The Bottling Plant was the dream and the creation of Bert Hansen. The decor is lavishly embellished with a vast collection of Coca-Cola memorabelia acquired by Bert from all over the country ... and the sight of it brightly decorating the walls evokes warm memories for the adult cro'wd. Loren and Bernadine took over the shop in March of this year. They're adding distinctive touches of their own to further enhance the charm. Laura Jervis helped with a rework of the menu which offers hungry friends an epicurean choice of ^dflHjjj^ ^^ An All-Star Cast of the Sexiest, Zaniest Burlesque Entertainers in Las Vegas. maxim HOTEL. CASING J $W/0 per person ^ Includes: Show, 2 Drinks and Taxes. Showtimes 8pm. 10 15pm and 12.30am Dark Monday salads and sandwiches. On the frigid fantasy side of the menu, all ice cream dishes feature the use of Dreyers Ice Dream ... and it's now available to take home, too. Grand Re-Opening This Weekend The Bottling Plant is hosting a Grand Reopening celebration this weekend ... to say "Thanks" to those whohave become loyal patrons .. and to invite new visitors to inpect and enjoy the tdtal experience of stepping back in time and relaxing with a beverage or ice cream goodie of your choice. Lots of special "Thank You's" are on the schedule. There'll be hourly drawings from noon to 6 p.m. on both days (Saturday and Sunday) for fountain delights. Although you must be present to win, you don't have to devour your winnings on the spot; a certificate will be Kiven so you may "starve up" before attacking your prize. At 9 p.m. each evening, there'll be a drawing for the fountain specialty known as a "Rockpile." Conjure up SIX scoops of ice cream (any flavor) smothered under three toppings of your choice and backed with a whole banana (sliced), nuts, whip cream and a cherry. This you won't attmept to tackle alone. On Sunday evening at 9, there's a grand prize drawing for a portable propane barbeque outTim Tilman To Address Church Women Three couplet from an Episcopal marriage Encounter Group w.ere the featured gpeaken at the regular meeting of the Episcopal Oiurch Women on May 4th. The couples explained the purpose of the encounters .is to make sood marriages better Dut are of no help to couples that are already in serious trouble. Age. length of the marriage or religious affiliation are not factors for attendingan encounter. The speftker for the next meeting will be Tim Tilman. >lr. TUman wUl speak on activities for .youth In Boulder City! Anyone wishing. to hear Mr. Tilman is welcome to attend. The date is June 1. Anyone not a member should _plan to arrive at 8:00 P.M. The meetingaare held in the basement of the diurdi. fit tachable griddle. A great prize ... and you don't have to be present to win this one. It promises to be an extra special weexend at The Bottling Plant. Be prepared to thoroughly enjoy every and allow time to browse and inspect the unique Coca-Cola collection. Bring along some quarters to play the old fashioned juke box and sway to the A big bang-up two days of fun, food and prizes is promised at The Bottling Plant on Arizona Street in downtown Boulder City. See youthere! When Bernadine Nicolson. first uf the Coca-Cola Qottling Plant on Arizona St., it was instant love. Later when meetins people at the Grand Opening of the new B.C. Library she commented to one and all, "We cannot let that shrine remaUi closed." Boulder City owes so much .to Lbren and Bernadine Nicolson. The. Bottling Plant.was buUt out of sheer love for its museum collection by former owner, the well loved Bert Hansen. He so happily dines there now. He sees some of bis former employees working there. He sees it is growins in popularity. He luows it is a happy place.anda needed place in Boulder City. The Bottling Plant is the forerunner of. many more businesses like it. If Boulder City continues to attain the look of the 30's. it will indeed not only have Landmark Status, it will be a landmark in beauty and fun. Companionship and friendly conversation. How many patrons visitipg the Bottling PJant have taken note of the kiddie menu? Grilled dieese sandwicn, 75 cents. A kiddie dog, for $1.00? Followed by bubble gum (blue) icecream. Once there were over 15 bubble gums in a single cone. Almott M oraek babble gun kecreaiB Is sold to tbe yoongM gwMialloo as Is sold hi all otber flavors but togetber. Loren and Bernadine Nicolson are as. suited to the Bottling Plant u an ice cream scoop is suited to a sugar cone. So natural and friendly and wonderful as two people could be. Immediately at home, both 6f them Jove people of every ase, and Bernadine is workina harci at remembering the names of every single person coming in the door. They enjoy the tourists and expect to see more and more of them as the weather warms up. But it is local people they cater to and hope to have come back again and agahi. .You might see a new look on the menu (which will be hard to improve) iif one of. their daughters, Cathy Tugel, comes for a.visit. She just, won the sweepstakes blue ribbon .for cooking and confectionary at the Salinas County Fair. Out of 28 ribbons she was awarded 15 blue ribbons. We are all expecting some fine desserts when she and her sister Kay. and those four grandsons (two for .each girl) and their husbands make the first trip, to see their parents enjoying every minute serving us great goodies at the Bottling Plant. Loren claimed Bernadine as his bride 32 years ago. .They proudly, call themselves farmers. This would explain the. friendliness that is as natural to them as walldng down the street. They ctfme from the "Lettuce Bowl of the World^' Salinas, Cal. Loren had Jived there for 36 years. Bernadine for 33. How come it took you so long to ask her for her hand, Loren? The Grand Opening at the Bottling Plant wUl be hard on your diet. Every hour a free Sundae, (Free). The grand daddy prize is an enormous dish of icecream that takes an entire family to eat one.. We wish them luck. From what we see up tbere^they have everythins going for them. The right cooks, the right stan, the right location, and above.and beyond it all..they are so right for the place. We hope, all the other businesses give the town that lift.that the Bottling Plant has. Jt will be known, throughout Uie worlds just like Hoover Dam, if the present good luck and Henderson ftome News and Boulder City News Page 33 DupBcate Bridge Tournament Duplicate Bridge Tournament. The Hen-' derson Boulder City unit 371 will hold its annual sectional tournament in rooms Dl and D2 of the Las Vegas Convention Center on Friday, May 21,1:30 p.m. and 8 p.m., Saturday, May 22,1:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. and Sunday, May 23, 12 noon and 6 p.m. Entry fees $3.50 per session. The Boston Latin School, the oldest public school In America, was established in Boston, Massachusetts on February 13, 1635. Aggie, ^^wm. HeCeK & Bettg ANNOUNCE^ GBAMODPEhUNG AT 2510 E. TROPICANA NEAR EASTERN ON FRIDAY, MAY 21 & SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1982 • WENDY WILL BE THERE WITH FREE BALLOONS • IF YOUR FOOD IS SERVED ON THE LUCKY TRAY, YOU WILL WIN A FREE MEAL —^—^^^ PALM MEMORIAL PARK 'Everything In One Location" •CHAPEL • CEMETERY •MORTUARY MAUSOLEUM Phone: 564-1888 800 Boulder Highway, Henderson Basic Photo offers you VALUABLE COUPON I FfSebee Offer Three KODAK Color Enlargements for the price of two \ Bring In this coupon with your favorite KODACOLOR Film negatives, color slides, color prints or instant color prints. Receive 3 color enlorgements for the price of 2 processed by Kodak. Freebee offer expires June 16,1982. VALUABLE COUPON BASIC PHOTOPHONE-565-7627 19 WATER STREET-HENDERSON 1,000 BALLOONS WILL BE RELEASED SOME BALLOONS WILL CONTAIN COUPONS FOR PRIZES SUCH AS: ATARI VIDEO GAME + PAC-MAIW CARTRIDGE 5" B&W TV/AM/FM RADIO HOME MUSIC CENTER • AM/FM STEREO CLOCK RADIO, BUILT-IN CASSETTE TAPE UNIT WITH TWO REMOTE SPEAKERS SEASON PASSES TO 1982 UNLVFOOTBALL GAMES AM/FM STEREO RADIO WITH HEAD PHONES COUPONS MUST BE REDEEMED BY JUNE 21, 1982 THANK YOU LAS VEGAS FOR MAKING WENDY'S THE m HAMBURGER WE'RE OPENING ANOTHER RESTAUJRANT TO PROVIDE MORE QUALITY FOOD AND FAST SERVICE OTHER LOCATIONS ARE: 1725 W. Charleston Blvd 4400 W. Sahara Ave. 301 S. Decatur Blvd. 400 S. Boulder Hwy., Hdn. 4780 S. Maryland Parkway '4760 E. Flamingo Road 1616 E. Lake Mead Blvd. 844 N. Rancho Drive 2601 S. Eastern Ave. AINT NO REASON TO GO ANYPLACE ELSE. imm ^^ Louis Prima's Witnesses ...OFM/aaiHG THEIRAUDIEnCES: • Split their sides ivith iaugliter • Relive the big band days as they were .* Jump to the energy of hits, new and old, played with polish. Several of the great Lxjuis Prima's top musicians, known as Louis Prlmas WITHESSES, alias The Qoofers. jvill present their evidence nightly (except Mondays) from 10 PM to 2 AM. From April 6th through May 30th at the Drench Quarter Lounge __„ in the FburQiieeiis Hotel/Casino Downtown • 386-4011 -^ / / / j / \Ni • mim^ 2140 BOULDER HWY. LUNCHEON MENU ^^/^/^.. 565-1494, • WEEkLV SPECIAL TVB^a^/^ S/jr£.. .. 3,28 WED ^-^C^ £A£i^SAc!4::j^/^. .3, THURS. /V/j'we S73&K r xjtre ~ EKTRAS ^Vg^ S^^u4^ OOAStSTTTS. .. ^/y^iL£/ys.. .-.'.1.50 TUNA SAU> a^f^Kr^P ^5
PAGE 33

IUU*aW>. AM^ mv, AftOti 1 v •<• vut,vu nuiuv i^ewa -" u^u*uc> v/.*^ nvwj "starve'up" before fit with a un\que**deminute of your visit ... tunes of the 40's. Thursday, May 20,1982 The Botding Plant and a Conversation With Bernadine Nicolson Loren and Bernadine Nicolson by Bill Harbour Take a nostalgic step back in time., at The Bottling Plant in Boulder City. Remember the corner drug store with its soda fountain ... offering afternoon delights such as flavored cokes with a dash of vanilla, lemon, or syrup of your choice? There Were phosphates .. chocolate egg creams ... and rich, thick malts and shakes to quench the thirst and satisfy the soul. On those days when the wallet had a bit of a bulge, the fountain menu offered extravagant delights such as sundaes, sodas and (kingof them all) njultiflavored banana splits ... running over with tasty toppings. All this ... and the atmosphere that surrounds it... is till alive and well at The Bottling Plant. Loren and Bernadine Nicolson are the owner operators of the enticing facility ... and this warm friendly couple really go out of their way to insure that each and every visitor feels right at home. The Bottling Plant was the dream and the creation of Bert Hansen. The decor is lavishly embellished with a vast collection of Coca-Cola memorabelia acquired by Bert from all over the country ... and the sight of it brightly decorating the walls evokes warm memories for the adult cro'wd. Loren and Bernadine took over the shop in March of this year. They're adding distinctive touches of their own to further enhance the charm. Laura Jervis helped with a rework of the menu which offers hungry friends an epicurean choice of ^dflHjjj^ ^^ An All-Star Cast of the Sexiest, Zaniest Burlesque Entertainers in Las Vegas. maxim HOTEL. CASING J $W/0 per person ^ Includes: Show, 2 Drinks and Taxes. Showtimes 8pm. 10 15pm and 12.30am Dark Monday salads and sandwiches. On the frigid fantasy side of the menu, all ice cream dishes feature the use of Dreyers Ice Dream ... and it's now available to take home, too. Grand Re-Opening This Weekend The Bottling Plant is hosting a Grand Reopening celebration this weekend ... to say "Thanks" to those whohave become loyal patrons .. and to invite new visitors to inpect and enjoy the tdtal experience of stepping back in time and relaxing with a beverage or ice cream goodie of your choice. Lots of special "Thank You's" are on the schedule. There'll be hourly drawings from noon to 6 p.m. on both days (Saturday and Sunday) for fountain delights. Although you must be present to win, you don't have to devour your winnings on the spot; a certificate will be Kiven so you may "starve up" before attacking your prize. At 9 p.m. each evening, there'll be a drawing for the fountain specialty known as a "Rockpile." Conjure up SIX scoops of ice cream (any flavor) smothered under three toppings of your choice and backed with a whole banana (sliced), nuts, whip cream and a cherry. This you won't attmept to tackle alone. On Sunday evening at 9, there's a grand prize drawing for a portable propane barbeque outTim Tilman To Address Church Women Three couplet from an Episcopal marriage Encounter Group w.ere the featured gpeaken at the regular meeting of the Episcopal Oiurch Women on May 4th. The couples explained the purpose of the encounters .is to make sood marriages better Dut are of no help to couples that are already in serious trouble. Age. length of the marriage or religious affiliation are not factors for attendingan encounter. The speftker for the next meeting will be Tim Tilman. >lr. TUman wUl speak on activities for .youth In Boulder City! Anyone wishing. to hear Mr. Tilman is welcome to attend. The date is June 1. Anyone not a member should _plan to arrive at 8:00 P.M. The meetingaare held in the basement of the diurdi. fit tachable griddle. A great prize ... and you don't have to be present to win this one. It promises to be an extra special weexend at The Bottling Plant. Be prepared to thoroughly enjoy every and allow time to browse and inspect the unique Coca-Cola collection. Bring along some quarters to play the old fashioned juke box and sway to the A big bang-up two days of fun, food and prizes is promised at The Bottling Plant on Arizona Street in downtown Boulder City. See youthere! When Bernadine Nicolson. first uf the Coca-Cola Qottling Plant on Arizona St., it was instant love. Later when meetins people at the Grand Opening of the new B.C. Library she commented to one and all, "We cannot let that shrine remaUi closed." Boulder City owes so much .to Lbren and Bernadine Nicolson. The. Bottling Plant.was buUt out of sheer love for its museum collection by former owner, the well loved Bert Hansen. He so happily dines there now. He sees some of bis former employees working there. He sees it is growins in popularity. He luows it is a happy place.anda needed place in Boulder City. The Bottling Plant is the forerunner of. many more businesses like it. If Boulder City continues to attain the look of the 30's. it will indeed not only have Landmark Status, it will be a landmark in beauty and fun. Companionship and friendly conversation. How many patrons visitipg the Bottling PJant have taken note of the kiddie menu? Grilled dieese sandwicn, 75 cents. A kiddie dog, for $1.00? Followed by bubble gum (blue) icecream. Once there were over 15 bubble gums in a single cone. Almott M oraek babble gun kecreaiB Is sold to tbe yoongM gwMialloo as Is sold hi all otber flavors but togetber. Loren and Bernadine Nicolson are as. suited to the Bottling Plant u an ice cream scoop is suited to a sugar cone. So natural and friendly and wonderful as two people could be. Immediately at home, both 6f them Jove people of every ase, and Bernadine is workina harci at remembering the names of every single person coming in the door. They enjoy the tourists and expect to see more and more of them as the weather warms up. But it is local people they cater to and hope to have come back again and agahi. .You might see a new look on the menu (which will be hard to improve) iif one of. their daughters, Cathy Tugel, comes for a.visit. She just, won the sweepstakes blue ribbon .for cooking and confectionary at the Salinas County Fair. Out of 28 ribbons she was awarded 15 blue ribbons. We are all expecting some fine desserts when she and her sister Kay. and those four grandsons (two for .each girl) and their husbands make the first trip, to see their parents enjoying every minute serving us great goodies at the Bottling Plant. Loren claimed Bernadine as his bride 32 years ago. .They proudly, call themselves farmers. This would explain the. friendliness that is as natural to them as walldng down the street. They ctfme from the "Lettuce Bowl of the World^' Salinas, Cal. Loren had Jived there for 36 years. Bernadine for 33. How come it took you so long to ask her for her hand, Loren? The Grand Opening at the Bottling Plant wUl be hard on your diet. Every hour a free Sundae, (Free). The grand daddy prize is an enormous dish of icecream that takes an entire family to eat one.. We wish them luck. From what we see up tbere^they have everythins going for them. The right cooks, the right stan, the right location, and above.and beyond it all..they are so right for the place. We hope, all the other businesses give the town that lift.that the Bottling Plant has. Jt will be known, throughout Uie worlds just like Hoover Dam, if the present good luck and Henderson ftome News and Boulder City News Page 33 DupBcate Bridge Tournament Duplicate Bridge Tournament. The Hen-' derson Boulder City unit 371 will hold its annual sectional tournament in rooms Dl and D2 of the Las Vegas Convention Center on Friday, May 21,1:30 p.m. and 8 p.m., Saturday, May 22,1:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. and Sunday, May 23, 12 noon and 6 p.m. Entry fees $3.50 per session. The Boston Latin School, the oldest public school In America, was established in Boston, Massachusetts on February 13, 1635. Aggie, ^^wm. HeCeK & Bettg ANNOUNCE^ GBAMODPEhUNG AT 2510 E. TROPICANA NEAR EASTERN ON FRIDAY, MAY 21 & SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1982 • WENDY WILL BE THERE WITH FREE BALLOONS • IF YOUR FOOD IS SERVED ON THE LUCKY TRAY, YOU WILL WIN A FREE MEAL —^—^^^ PALM MEMORIAL PARK 'Everything In One Location" •CHAPEL • CEMETERY •MORTUARY MAUSOLEUM Phone: 564-1888 800 Boulder Highway, Henderson Basic Photo offers you VALUABLE COUPON I FfSebee Offer Three KODAK Color Enlargements for the price of two \ Bring In this coupon with your favorite KODACOLOR Film negatives, color slides, color prints or instant color prints. Receive 3 color enlorgements for the price of 2 processed by Kodak. Freebee offer expires June 16,1982. VALUABLE COUPON BASIC PHOTOPHONE-565-7627 19 WATER STREET-HENDERSON 1,000 BALLOONS WILL BE RELEASED SOME BALLOONS WILL CONTAIN COUPONS FOR PRIZES SUCH AS: ATARI VIDEO GAME + PAC-MAIW CARTRIDGE 5" B&W TV/AM/FM RADIO HOME MUSIC CENTER • AM/FM STEREO CLOCK RADIO, BUILT-IN CASSETTE TAPE UNIT WITH TWO REMOTE SPEAKERS SEASON PASSES TO 1982 UNLVFOOTBALL GAMES AM/FM STEREO RADIO WITH HEAD PHONES COUPONS MUST BE REDEEMED BY JUNE 21, 1982 THANK YOU LAS VEGAS FOR MAKING WENDY'S THE m HAMBURGER WE'RE OPENING ANOTHER RESTAUJRANT TO PROVIDE MORE QUALITY FOOD AND FAST SERVICE OTHER LOCATIONS ARE: 1725 W. Charleston Blvd 4400 W. Sahara Ave. 301 S. Decatur Blvd. 400 S. Boulder Hwy., Hdn. 4780 S. Maryland Parkway '4760 E. Flamingo Road 1616 E. Lake Mead Blvd. 844 N. Rancho Drive 2601 S. Eastern Ave. AINT NO REASON TO GO ANYPLACE ELSE. imm ^^ Louis Prima's Witnesses ...OFM/aaiHG THEIRAUDIEnCES: • Split their sides ivith iaugliter • Relive the big band days as they were .* Jump to the energy of hits, new and old, played with polish. Several of the great Lxjuis Prima's top musicians, known as Louis Prlmas WITHESSES, alias The Qoofers. jvill present their evidence nightly (except Mondays) from 10 PM to 2 AM. From April 6th through May 30th at the Drench Quarter Lounge __„ in the FburQiieeiis Hotel/Casino Downtown • 386-4011 -^ / / / j / \Ni • mim^ 2140 BOULDER HWY. LUNCHEON MENU ^^/^/^.. 565-1494, • WEEkLV SPECIAL TVB^a^/^ S/jr£.. .. 3,28 WED ^-^C^ £A£i^SAc!4::j^/^. .3, THURS. /V/j'we S73&K r xjtre ~ EKTRAS ^Vg^ S^^u4^ OOAStSTTTS. .. ^/y^iL£/ys.. .-.'.1.50 TUNA SAU> a^f^Kr^P ^5
PAGE 34

• OiwPW iO Wii Page 34 Henderson Home News and Boulder C ity News Bmrider City Chamber of Commerce Report Cannon Says New Federalism Threatens Nursing Care By John H. Lehr Forty members and guests were present at the May 12th meeting held at Collie's Restaurant and Lounge on Nevada Highway. President Darlene Burk welcomed Americana Group Realty represented by D. Mark N. Miscevic and Anchor Realty represented by Katie Cartldge as new members and presented them with packets. May has been designated by the President of the United States, the Governor of Nevada and the Mayor of Las Vegas as, "Senior Citizens Month", a time when we honor Our elderly population in # special way. With this in mind the Chamber went on record to assist the Clark County Committee for Aging in sponsoring the 7th annual "Take A Senior To Lunch Day. The luncheon will be held Saturday, May 29th at noon in the Sahara Hotel. This year tickets are $8.50 each. Call John Liveratti at Senior Center for ticket information. This year for the first time the Chamber presented a scholarship tu a graduating senior from Boulder City High School. The Scholarship Committee presented a $500 scholarship to Mike Lasko as its' first recipient. ,. President Burk announced that the theme for this years Damboree will be "One In Spirit For America." This year the Chamberwill assist the Jaycees with their drive for, fireworks donations. Steve Porter of the Beautification Committee reported the citywide clean-up twothirds completed. The runner of committee is working bowling About ago, historiani say "Workers in Nevada are in jeopardy for their very lives due to job environmental safety and health hazards. Teaching workers their rights and responsibilities in identifying these hazards is one of our top priorities," according to Nevada State AFL-CIO President, Mark Massagli. President Massagli's remarks came as he announced the forthcoming Nevada Rocky Mountain Occupational Safety and Health Conference scheduled for June 4,1982 at the Frontier Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada from 8:30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. The conference, a Department of Labor funded eight-state training program, brings noted environmental safety and health professionals from international union staffs, university departments of health, as well as national, regional, state and local union and governmental agencies. "As the workers we represent become more the victims than the victors in the current social and economic situation, we are called upon to exercise unusual leadership." Massagli continued "We're holding this conference to allow workers an unprecedented opportunity to hear highly regarded professionals, as well as participate in industry specific work~ shops tailored to New Materials Mean New Success a thousand years urethane cover stock. to the community the lab and X-ray are open from 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Other services expanded include new cardiac monitoring equipment with Glemetry that can monitor patients progress as they move around the hospital. The hospital has reopened its obstetrics department in July of 81, since that time 41 boys and 30 girls have been born in Boulder City. Are you aware that the hospital is working to have specialists partial days in Dr. Smith's office in Boulder City. At the present time the schedule is as follows Monday morning, Dr. Bowers or Siragusa, Cardiology; Tuesday, Dr. Angeles, Pediatrics; Wednesday morning. Dr. Sparkuhl, Urology; Wednesday p.m.. Dr. Buker, Ear, Nose and Throat. Boulder City will be having a Blood Drive May 20th, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge. Remember Blood is Life .... Pass It On! it Was Meant To Circulate! Mary Homers final remarks were "I'm very proud of Boulder City Hospital and hope you are also we care are not just words • at Boulder City Hospital we really do carel A flash Hood rule: watch for rising water levels. Nevada." The Nevada Conference is the fifth of eight held throughout the Rocky Mountain states. Pat Meinhardt, Rocky Mountain Occupational Safety and Health Project Director, explained that the Montana based project is co-sponsored by all eight state federations of labor and underwritten by the Department of Labor's "New Directions" grant program. According to Meinhardt, the conference speakers and workshop leaders will present workers with basic information on their rights under O.S.H.A. and M.S.HA. and identify specific job hazards, show how to recognize them. avoid them or limit exposure to them. "I believe these conferences are critical to reducing the incidence of job-related deaths and injuries. Because the afternoon workshops cover four occupational areas refiecting Nevada's situation and stress two-way interchange, we will learn as much as we teach." Thursday, May 20,1982 MS Benefit Picnic The Magic Home Centers of Las Vegas in conjunction with many local businesses in our Southern Nevada community are sponsoring a picnic to benefit Multiple Sclerosis on Sunday, May 30 at Sunset Park from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission is tnt. Concessions will be selling hot dogs, hamburgers, refreshments and barbecued half chickens. There will be clowns, entertainment and special raffles. Stop by for a day of great family fun. Anyone who would like to donate some baked goods, please call the Multiple Sclerosis office for details at 362-7772. Governor List Ukes 4-H LAS VEGAS Today's 4-H programs give Nevada youngsters the chance to experience the world around them, rather than just read about it. Governor Robert List said TuesIii a speech to the Clark County 4-H Volunteer Appreciation Buffet, the governor said that as the state continues to grow in populationand become more urbanized, the importance of these programs will grow as well. "Today, in our nation according to a recent study most young Americans see wildlife on television. They learn about their environment through films and tapes in schools. "Through 4-H, they will have a chance to test themselves against nature, and grow through that involvement. And through those experiences they can gain a greater insight into themselves." The governor noted that through the work of volunteers, 4-H programs touch the lives of more than 18,000 youngsters in the state. 4-H volunteers include representatives from other youth services agencies, people with special skills who support the program, but do not work directly with the youth, and those who support 4-H through their donations of time, talent and money. In an era of budget cutbacks and revised spending priorities, the need for volunteer service is even more critical in all kinds of social service programs and community activities. 4-H, of course, is one of the rtiost important, the governor said. ifsAFAa! No one in the Dinka tribe of Africa would question the ideal gift for a father. Each paternal family head eagerly awaits the day when he receives the one "perfect" present from his son — the skin of the first lion the young man kills. cover stock, the German first of its kind in the sport. tribesmen stood their clubs The ball was developed after on the ground and tried to inte'tuive research on the knock them down with dynamics of a strike to round stones, the foredetermine the qualities a the game of sail should have for optiThese stones mum scorinc success. The f HOTEL BANQUET & CATERING SERVICE Fof Groups 75 to 250 People • Meetings • Cocktail Parties • Wedding Receptions • Holiday Parties • Luncheons • Dinners • Any Special Event ALL FUNCTIONS INCLUDE FREE VALET PARKING "VVe will make your occasion an event..." Call Food/Beverage Office 385-3232 ExL 631 MEMORIAL DAY CAMPING/FISHING SPECIALS nut dotailo tn tnmt •<>>'•* '"*<> bow\lnf bmlU"coefficient of friction" of V._.!_?:* ;u_ l-'l first made of wood, then the ban planters in the down town area with trees, flowering plants, etc. The City Council aiked the Chamber's Beautifucation Committee to coordinate its efforts with the City. Goodbyes were said to a couple of "Inkslingers ", Wayne and Dorothy Bennett. The Bennetts have sold their house in Boulder City and depart May 26th for Minnesota. Bon —voyage, Wayne and Dorothy. May Homer, Administrator of the Boulder City Hospital addressed Chamber members and made them aware of the services and care provided by our hospital. Did you know last year the Emergency Room had 3643 patient visits, through April "82 there have been over 1200 visits. Further did you know that the Emergency Room is staffed 24 hours a day by Doctors Cavanagh, Willard and Uyeno. Also as a convenience to the lane was rubber, and today the more found to be its most exotic forms of polyester, important physical propEquipment has contriberty. Computerized tests uted greatly to some of the conducted at Stanford Uniincredible achievements atversity on the trajectory of tained by the modern day g bowling ball programmed athlete. Fiberglass has enthe optimum curvature and abled pole vaulters to soar determined that the greatest to new records. Tennis part of the curve should racquets and golf clubs occur as far down the lane made of graphite, alumias possible. The surface num, and other composicharacteristics of urethane tions have increed power, provided this ball control control, and accuracy, and led to the development Synthetic fibers have given of the AMF Angle ball, skiers aerodynamic freedom Introduced in early 1981, of movement. And space the ball has been used to set age technotogy has made its gome notable records in the contribution to the nation's professional and amateur largest participant sport ranks including an unprethrough the introduction of cedented three 300 games an innovative bowling ball, by a bowler in a 12-game The newest bowling ball is get—a new world record! the AMF Angle made of a Paint along with Laura Mann Tuefday morning tt Tueiday afternoons 'Gingef Ctemonj ''SSI AvanooX" BoukMr City, NV 89005 293-4876 ART • MACRAME • HOBBY< SUPPLIES INVEST IN YOUR OWN BACK YARD! ^ beautiful lawn and garden make those delightful summer days and nights even more pleasurable ... while increasing th value of your home. Stop in today and we'll help make your yard the showpiece of the neighborhood. ^ LandKSpIng Service • UMm fr Gerden Supples • Indoor Phnts • PDb end What Noti • Trees end Bushes • Beddng Plants Hoppy Mother's Day Gtfi CMiHkatM Avdliyt M&H Oasis Nursery 'U74 Ntv. Hwy (MwiMI Ploa) 293-4987 • YELLX)W FRONT WFRE FULL OF SURPRISES! Prices Effective thru Wednesday May 26, 1M2 DaMjr tM-9:i Sunday f ;(MMI:< PHONE SS-7tS5 526 BOULDiR HWY. —HENDIRSON— [Thursday, May 20,1982 Nevada State Aa-CIO Hosts Worker Health and Safety Confererae Henderson Home News and Boulder Cfty News Page 35 LAS VEGAS -Sen. Howard Cannon told nursing care officials the proposed "New Federalism" swap of federal and state programs could adversely affect their ability to provide care. "Should the propoied swap take place, approximately 18 social health and nutritional services programs, all of which directly or indirectly affect long-term health care, would be turned back to the states," Cannon said at a semi>nar at the Riviera Hotel. "I am skeptical about Nevada's ability to pick up the tab for these programs and I do not want to see them reduced or po.ssibly eliminated as a result of insufficient funds." Cannon pointed out that legislation to implement the New Federalism idea has not yet been introduced because of unanswered questions about it. Nevertheless, he stated, proposed cuts in Medicare and Medicaid i Damborae Doings Parade Entry Forms HELP! SOS! MAYDAY! PLEASE READ YOUR NEWSPAPER! Though an article appeared in the Boulder City News stating that entfy forms and information sheets for the Damboree Parade were now available I've had a fair number of BC News subscribers ask me about the availability of entry forms, etc. So here is the info again. Anyone interested in participating in this year's "4th of July" parade (to be held on the 3rd of July) may pick up their entry forms, maps and instructions at the Boulder City Chamber of Commerce or the Boulder Qity News Office. Interested organizations or individuals living outside of Boulder City can call the CofC Lord's Supper Served We of the Henderson : Christian Church are j^ willing to gamble that p when you look into the 4 mirror you don't see a jstranger looking back!! iln creation God made kdam in His image, inmding man to reflect >e nature and life of >d. Somewhat like a irror catches the kin's rays and transiMiits them by reflection. Slave you stopped to f ifonsider what reflecTon the "Church" as he corporate repesentation of Christ's ^ijresence, is transmit'^ted into the world?? t We, as well as All, fall ;S' far short of God's original intention for ; Christ's body, but Praise God for the sancI tifying work of the Holy • Spirit; building us up into a Holy Temple (1 Pet. 2:5) to the point of being filled full with Christ. (Eph. 2:21) We invite you to join us in our maturing in Christ under the discipling ministry of Pastor Duane Riggenbach as he seeks to establish and strengthen us, urging, warning and encouraging us to stand firm in the faith (Acts 14:22) and to live lives that reflect godly qualities as we walk iti obedience to the Holy Spirit. Sunday service begins at 9:15 a.mfor Song; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Communion service. Sunday evening Bible Study and Youth Groups begin at 6:30 p.m. This Friday night and Saturday we will experience true Christian Community as we meet for a weekend CampoutatLake Mead. The Lord be praised for the unity of Spirit and Soul within our young body. We know He's not finished with us yet, and as we count Him faithful to perfect us in the image of Christ we rejoice even in our weaknesses, that God's strength might be iperfected in us. Phone 564-7899. SIMPLE RECIPES APPEAL TO.NOVICE COOKS Spring's a good time to corral the family team into ihv kitchen for some cooking lessons. The secret to a.sking and ^.. receiving assistance Is to have recipes which are simple yol i# delicious. Here's one that can be made by any member of ^ the family in about 25 minutes tops! Onions and celery are good food staples to start with. Next use a conven ience food such as canned wavy macaroni with little meat balls in its own rich tomato sauce. Add a touch of sour cream and some dill and you've got the makings of a real spring success, PASTA STROGANOFF '3/4 cup chopped onions 3/4 cup chopped celery 2tablespoons butter or margarine 1 package (10 oz.) frozen peas, thawed 2 cans (15 oz. each) Chef Boyardee Roller Couters 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried dill we#d 3/4 cup sour cream Saut< onions and celery in butter until golden. Add thawed frozen peas. Roller Coasters and dill; stir; cover simmer for 10 minutes. Add sour cream; stir; simmer for S more minutes. Serves 4 to 6 293-2034 or Nelson 293-2889 for the forms. The Parade entry deadline is June 18th so pick up those forms and get them in. Parade participants will be happy to hear that this year they will againbe marching down hill^as the parade will start on Colorado at Nevada Hwy. The Damboree Doings will take place in City Park. programs would have "major consequences for the provision of long-term health care services." Medicare outlays would be reduced by some $2.5 billion and Medicaid by $2.1 billion in the upcoming budget year. Cannon said he could not support cuts of that magnitude, coming after reductions in both programs last .year. "While I agree with the President's general goal of reducing federal spending, I don't think it should be accomplished at the expense of those people who are least able to bear additional burdens the sick, the el-. derly or the disabled," he said. Vets Rehabilitation Committee To Meet HENDERSON CHRISTIAN CHURCH The Southside Christian Church takes pride in serving the Lord's Supper for all folk who Love the Saviour. This Sunday, Rod Poindexter, will preside at the table, with Carroll Williams, Rex Johnson. Ray Fisher, Fred Autcnreith. Dr. Hiram Hunt, Ron Gordon, Clyde Gale participating. At the 9:30 a.m. Sunday service also. Pastor Joel Rivers will be preaching on the topic of "When God's Last Name is Not Damn!" The minister is going through the Book of Acts in his preaching. The musical program begins with a beautiful selection of organ music by Dr. Vicky Onyett. Then, Pastor Rivers will be assisting in bringing special requests into the song service on the love of God. On Sunday, May 30, the William H. Nellis Po.st No. 9774, will be conducting a memorial service in Paradise The Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation will meet June 9 and 10, at the Veterans Administration C;gntral Office in Washington, D.C., the VA announced today. Both sessions will convene at 9:00 a.m. in Room 1010 at the VA's Central Office, located at 810 Vermont Avenue, N.W. Committee members will review the administration of veterans' rehabilitation programs andprovide recommendations to the VA Administrator. This will be the secondmeeting of the 10 member panel named by VA Administrator Robert P. Nimmo earlier this year to assist him in directing the Agency's rehabilitation programs. The committee was established by Congress as part of the Veterans' Rehabilitation and Education Amendments of 1980. Agenda items for the June meeting will include rehabilitation medicine, vocational guidance, vocational rehabilitation and employment and training for the nation's veterans. Memorial Gardens at 9 a.m. The public is invited for this short service. The first annual pot luck picnic of Southside Christian will be held at Sunset Park on June 27th at noonish. For more information about this independent Christian church or ministerial services, please call 458-2731. Both sessions will be open to the public up to seating capacity of the room. Those wishing to attend the meeting should contact Dr. Norwood Williams, the committee's executive secretary, at (202) 389-3098. Details of the meeting were published in the Federal Register May 6, 1982. eeo^aiceo4 Gerleman Chiropractic Office will be closed j^ Thursday Afternoon, May 20, 21, and 22nd. .^. while attending a Chiropractic Seminar The Office will be Open Monday, May 24th Safeway Shopping Center Henderson 564-2331 WIMTA SILVER STATE POOL SERVICE Serving Boulder City K. Hi-nderson A(II> WA.SHK.S, Fl'MPS. MOTOR.S. ^ IlKATKR. FILTKRS, ^ RKPAIK.S. >I()NTm,V A( (Ol'MS FREE ESTIMATES 293-6842 Super Specials jMONDAYA Week at the Eldorado Casino 5 P.M.-11 PM Spaghetti Night "All you can eat" includes tossed salad bowl, garic toast 2/3^ ^ rTUESDAYPork Chops 2/355 IHINESDAYBBQ Beef Back Ribs 2/3 J5 mURSOAYCountry Fried Steak 2/355 FRIDAYFish Fry "All you care to Eat" 255 OR Roas*^ Prime Rib of Beef 3.75 SATURDAYSteak & Shrimp choice of potatoes, tossed salad bowl "ALWAYS ON SUNDAY" 11 am-ii pm Baked Virginia Ham oi^ 3.75 Roast Tom Turkey served with all the trimmings _*!A11 you care to Eat" 3.50 Eldorado Casino DOWNTOWN HENDERSON i Protsslonl Intunno* Planning tp liA PORTA INSURANCE AGENCY INC. Louli LaPwta 'JMtrvIn ROM • Peter LaPorta Beraie ThUllU • Mike Moq-lttey (Life) 1M Way t t ISISCTroploana LM Vegai 7S3-2MC m^m

PAGE 35

• OiwPW iO Wii Page 34 Henderson Home News and Boulder C ity News Bmrider City Chamber of Commerce Report Cannon Says New Federalism Threatens Nursing Care By John H. Lehr Forty members and guests were present at the May 12th meeting held at Collie's Restaurant and Lounge on Nevada Highway. President Darlene Burk welcomed Americana Group Realty represented by D. Mark N. Miscevic and Anchor Realty represented by Katie Cartldge as new members and presented them with packets. May has been designated by the President of the United States, the Governor of Nevada and the Mayor of Las Vegas as, "Senior Citizens Month", a time when we honor Our elderly population in # special way. With this in mind the Chamber went on record to assist the Clark County Committee for Aging in sponsoring the 7th annual "Take A Senior To Lunch Day. The luncheon will be held Saturday, May 29th at noon in the Sahara Hotel. This year tickets are $8.50 each. Call John Liveratti at Senior Center for ticket information. This year for the first time the Chamber presented a scholarship tu a graduating senior from Boulder City High School. The Scholarship Committee presented a $500 scholarship to Mike Lasko as its' first recipient. ,. President Burk announced that the theme for this years Damboree will be "One In Spirit For America." This year the Chamberwill assist the Jaycees with their drive for, fireworks donations. Steve Porter of the Beautification Committee reported the citywide clean-up twothirds completed. The runner of committee is working bowling About ago, historiani say "Workers in Nevada are in jeopardy for their very lives due to job environmental safety and health hazards. Teaching workers their rights and responsibilities in identifying these hazards is one of our top priorities," according to Nevada State AFL-CIO President, Mark Massagli. President Massagli's remarks came as he announced the forthcoming Nevada Rocky Mountain Occupational Safety and Health Conference scheduled for June 4,1982 at the Frontier Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada from 8:30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. The conference, a Department of Labor funded eight-state training program, brings noted environmental safety and health professionals from international union staffs, university departments of health, as well as national, regional, state and local union and governmental agencies. "As the workers we represent become more the victims than the victors in the current social and economic situation, we are called upon to exercise unusual leadership." Massagli continued "We're holding this conference to allow workers an unprecedented opportunity to hear highly regarded professionals, as well as participate in industry specific work~ shops tailored to New Materials Mean New Success a thousand years urethane cover stock. to the community the lab and X-ray are open from 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Other services expanded include new cardiac monitoring equipment with Glemetry that can monitor patients progress as they move around the hospital. The hospital has reopened its obstetrics department in July of 81, since that time 41 boys and 30 girls have been born in Boulder City. Are you aware that the hospital is working to have specialists partial days in Dr. Smith's office in Boulder City. At the present time the schedule is as follows Monday morning, Dr. Bowers or Siragusa, Cardiology; Tuesday, Dr. Angeles, Pediatrics; Wednesday morning. Dr. Sparkuhl, Urology; Wednesday p.m.. Dr. Buker, Ear, Nose and Throat. Boulder City will be having a Blood Drive May 20th, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge. Remember Blood is Life .... Pass It On! it Was Meant To Circulate! Mary Homers final remarks were "I'm very proud of Boulder City Hospital and hope you are also we care are not just words • at Boulder City Hospital we really do carel A flash Hood rule: watch for rising water levels. Nevada." The Nevada Conference is the fifth of eight held throughout the Rocky Mountain states. Pat Meinhardt, Rocky Mountain Occupational Safety and Health Project Director, explained that the Montana based project is co-sponsored by all eight state federations of labor and underwritten by the Department of Labor's "New Directions" grant program. According to Meinhardt, the conference speakers and workshop leaders will present workers with basic information on their rights under O.S.H.A. and M.S.HA. and identify specific job hazards, show how to recognize them. avoid them or limit exposure to them. "I believe these conferences are critical to reducing the incidence of job-related deaths and injuries. Because the afternoon workshops cover four occupational areas refiecting Nevada's situation and stress two-way interchange, we will learn as much as we teach." Thursday, May 20,1982 MS Benefit Picnic The Magic Home Centers of Las Vegas in conjunction with many local businesses in our Southern Nevada community are sponsoring a picnic to benefit Multiple Sclerosis on Sunday, May 30 at Sunset Park from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission is tnt. Concessions will be selling hot dogs, hamburgers, refreshments and barbecued half chickens. There will be clowns, entertainment and special raffles. Stop by for a day of great family fun. Anyone who would like to donate some baked goods, please call the Multiple Sclerosis office for details at 362-7772. Governor List Ukes 4-H LAS VEGAS Today's 4-H programs give Nevada youngsters the chance to experience the world around them, rather than just read about it. Governor Robert List said TuesIii a speech to the Clark County 4-H Volunteer Appreciation Buffet, the governor said that as the state continues to grow in populationand become more urbanized, the importance of these programs will grow as well. "Today, in our nation according to a recent study most young Americans see wildlife on television. They learn about their environment through films and tapes in schools. "Through 4-H, they will have a chance to test themselves against nature, and grow through that involvement. And through those experiences they can gain a greater insight into themselves." The governor noted that through the work of volunteers, 4-H programs touch the lives of more than 18,000 youngsters in the state. 4-H volunteers include representatives from other youth services agencies, people with special skills who support the program, but do not work directly with the youth, and those who support 4-H through their donations of time, talent and money. In an era of budget cutbacks and revised spending priorities, the need for volunteer service is even more critical in all kinds of social service programs and community activities. 4-H, of course, is one of the rtiost important, the governor said. ifsAFAa! No one in the Dinka tribe of Africa would question the ideal gift for a father. Each paternal family head eagerly awaits the day when he receives the one "perfect" present from his son — the skin of the first lion the young man kills. cover stock, the German first of its kind in the sport. tribesmen stood their clubs The ball was developed after on the ground and tried to inte'tuive research on the knock them down with dynamics of a strike to round stones, the foredetermine the qualities a the game of sail should have for optiThese stones mum scorinc success. The f HOTEL BANQUET & CATERING SERVICE Fof Groups 75 to 250 People • Meetings • Cocktail Parties • Wedding Receptions • Holiday Parties • Luncheons • Dinners • Any Special Event ALL FUNCTIONS INCLUDE FREE VALET PARKING "VVe will make your occasion an event..." Call Food/Beverage Office 385-3232 ExL 631 MEMORIAL DAY CAMPING/FISHING SPECIALS nut dotailo tn tnmt •<>>'•* '"*<> bow\lnf bmlU"coefficient of friction" of V._.!_?:* ;u_ l-'l first made of wood, then the ban planters in the down town area with trees, flowering plants, etc. The City Council aiked the Chamber's Beautifucation Committee to coordinate its efforts with the City. Goodbyes were said to a couple of "Inkslingers ", Wayne and Dorothy Bennett. The Bennetts have sold their house in Boulder City and depart May 26th for Minnesota. Bon —voyage, Wayne and Dorothy. May Homer, Administrator of the Boulder City Hospital addressed Chamber members and made them aware of the services and care provided by our hospital. Did you know last year the Emergency Room had 3643 patient visits, through April "82 there have been over 1200 visits. Further did you know that the Emergency Room is staffed 24 hours a day by Doctors Cavanagh, Willard and Uyeno. Also as a convenience to the lane was rubber, and today the more found to be its most exotic forms of polyester, important physical propEquipment has contriberty. Computerized tests uted greatly to some of the conducted at Stanford Uniincredible achievements atversity on the trajectory of tained by the modern day g bowling ball programmed athlete. Fiberglass has enthe optimum curvature and abled pole vaulters to soar determined that the greatest to new records. Tennis part of the curve should racquets and golf clubs occur as far down the lane made of graphite, alumias possible. The surface num, and other composicharacteristics of urethane tions have increed power, provided this ball control control, and accuracy, and led to the development Synthetic fibers have given of the AMF Angle ball, skiers aerodynamic freedom Introduced in early 1981, of movement. And space the ball has been used to set age technotogy has made its gome notable records in the contribution to the nation's professional and amateur largest participant sport ranks including an unprethrough the introduction of cedented three 300 games an innovative bowling ball, by a bowler in a 12-game The newest bowling ball is get—a new world record! the AMF Angle made of a Paint along with Laura Mann Tuefday morning tt Tueiday afternoons 'Gingef Ctemonj ''SSI AvanooX" BoukMr City, NV 89005 293-4876 ART • MACRAME • HOBBY< SUPPLIES INVEST IN YOUR OWN BACK YARD! ^ beautiful lawn and garden make those delightful summer days and nights even more pleasurable ... while increasing th value of your home. Stop in today and we'll help make your yard the showpiece of the neighborhood. ^ LandKSpIng Service • UMm fr Gerden Supples • Indoor Phnts • PDb end What Noti • Trees end Bushes • Beddng Plants Hoppy Mother's Day Gtfi CMiHkatM Avdliyt M&H Oasis Nursery 'U74 Ntv. Hwy (MwiMI Ploa) 293-4987 • YELLX)W FRONT WFRE FULL OF SURPRISES! Prices Effective thru Wednesday May 26, 1M2 DaMjr tM-9:i Sunday f ;(MMI:< PHONE SS-7tS5 526 BOULDiR HWY. —HENDIRSON— [Thursday, May 20,1982 Nevada State Aa-CIO Hosts Worker Health and Safety Confererae Henderson Home News and Boulder Cfty News Page 35 LAS VEGAS -Sen. Howard Cannon told nursing care officials the proposed "New Federalism" swap of federal and state programs could adversely affect their ability to provide care. "Should the propoied swap take place, approximately 18 social health and nutritional services programs, all of which directly or indirectly affect long-term health care, would be turned back to the states," Cannon said at a semi>nar at the Riviera Hotel. "I am skeptical about Nevada's ability to pick up the tab for these programs and I do not want to see them reduced or po.ssibly eliminated as a result of insufficient funds." Cannon pointed out that legislation to implement the New Federalism idea has not yet been introduced because of unanswered questions about it. Nevertheless, he stated, proposed cuts in Medicare and Medicaid i Damborae Doings Parade Entry Forms HELP! SOS! MAYDAY! PLEASE READ YOUR NEWSPAPER! Though an article appeared in the Boulder City News stating that entfy forms and information sheets for the Damboree Parade were now available I've had a fair number of BC News subscribers ask me about the availability of entry forms, etc. So here is the info again. Anyone interested in participating in this year's "4th of July" parade (to be held on the 3rd of July) may pick up their entry forms, maps and instructions at the Boulder City Chamber of Commerce or the Boulder Qity News Office. Interested organizations or individuals living outside of Boulder City can call the CofC Lord's Supper Served We of the Henderson : Christian Church are j^ willing to gamble that p when you look into the 4 mirror you don't see a jstranger looking back!! iln creation God made kdam in His image, inmding man to reflect >e nature and life of >d. Somewhat like a irror catches the kin's rays and transiMiits them by reflection. Slave you stopped to f ifonsider what reflecTon the "Church" as he corporate repesentation of Christ's ^ijresence, is transmit'^ted into the world?? t We, as well as All, fall ;S' far short of God's original intention for ; Christ's body, but Praise God for the sancI tifying work of the Holy • Spirit; building us up into a Holy Temple (1 Pet. 2:5) to the point of being filled full with Christ. (Eph. 2:21) We invite you to join us in our maturing in Christ under the discipling ministry of Pastor Duane Riggenbach as he seeks to establish and strengthen us, urging, warning and encouraging us to stand firm in the faith (Acts 14:22) and to live lives that reflect godly qualities as we walk iti obedience to the Holy Spirit. Sunday service begins at 9:15 a.mfor Song; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Communion service. Sunday evening Bible Study and Youth Groups begin at 6:30 p.m. This Friday night and Saturday we will experience true Christian Community as we meet for a weekend CampoutatLake Mead. The Lord be praised for the unity of Spirit and Soul within our young body. We know He's not finished with us yet, and as we count Him faithful to perfect us in the image of Christ we rejoice even in our weaknesses, that God's strength might be iperfected in us. Phone 564-7899. SIMPLE RECIPES APPEAL TO.NOVICE COOKS Spring's a good time to corral the family team into ihv kitchen for some cooking lessons. The secret to a.sking and ^.. receiving assistance Is to have recipes which are simple yol i# delicious. Here's one that can be made by any member of ^ the family in about 25 minutes tops! Onions and celery are good food staples to start with. Next use a conven ience food such as canned wavy macaroni with little meat balls in its own rich tomato sauce. Add a touch of sour cream and some dill and you've got the makings of a real spring success, PASTA STROGANOFF '3/4 cup chopped onions 3/4 cup chopped celery 2tablespoons butter or margarine 1 package (10 oz.) frozen peas, thawed 2 cans (15 oz. each) Chef Boyardee Roller Couters 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried dill we#d 3/4 cup sour cream Saut< onions and celery in butter until golden. Add thawed frozen peas. Roller Coasters and dill; stir; cover simmer for 10 minutes. Add sour cream; stir; simmer for S more minutes. Serves 4 to 6 293-2034 or Nelson 293-2889 for the forms. The Parade entry deadline is June 18th so pick up those forms and get them in. Parade participants will be happy to hear that this year they will againbe marching down hill^as the parade will start on Colorado at Nevada Hwy. The Damboree Doings will take place in City Park. programs would have "major consequences for the provision of long-term health care services." Medicare outlays would be reduced by some $2.5 billion and Medicaid by $2.1 billion in the upcoming budget year. Cannon said he could not support cuts of that magnitude, coming after reductions in both programs last .year. "While I agree with the President's general goal of reducing federal spending, I don't think it should be accomplished at the expense of those people who are least able to bear additional burdens the sick, the el-. derly or the disabled," he said. Vets Rehabilitation Committee To Meet HENDERSON CHRISTIAN CHURCH The Southside Christian Church takes pride in serving the Lord's Supper for all folk who Love the Saviour. This Sunday, Rod Poindexter, will preside at the table, with Carroll Williams, Rex Johnson. Ray Fisher, Fred Autcnreith. Dr. Hiram Hunt, Ron Gordon, Clyde Gale participating. At the 9:30 a.m. Sunday service also. Pastor Joel Rivers will be preaching on the topic of "When God's Last Name is Not Damn!" The minister is going through the Book of Acts in his preaching. The musical program begins with a beautiful selection of organ music by Dr. Vicky Onyett. Then, Pastor Rivers will be assisting in bringing special requests into the song service on the love of God. On Sunday, May 30, the William H. Nellis Po.st No. 9774, will be conducting a memorial service in Paradise The Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation will meet June 9 and 10, at the Veterans Administration C;gntral Office in Washington, D.C., the VA announced today. Both sessions will convene at 9:00 a.m. in Room 1010 at the VA's Central Office, located at 810 Vermont Avenue, N.W. Committee members will review the administration of veterans' rehabilitation programs andprovide recommendations to the VA Administrator. This will be the secondmeeting of the 10 member panel named by VA Administrator Robert P. Nimmo earlier this year to assist him in directing the Agency's rehabilitation programs. The committee was established by Congress as part of the Veterans' Rehabilitation and Education Amendments of 1980. Agenda items for the June meeting will include rehabilitation medicine, vocational guidance, vocational rehabilitation and employment and training for the nation's veterans. Memorial Gardens at 9 a.m. The public is invited for this short service. The first annual pot luck picnic of Southside Christian will be held at Sunset Park on June 27th at noonish. For more information about this independent Christian church or ministerial services, please call 458-2731. Both sessions will be open to the public up to seating capacity of the room. Those wishing to attend the meeting should contact Dr. Norwood Williams, the committee's executive secretary, at (202) 389-3098. Details of the meeting were published in the Federal Register May 6, 1982. eeo^aiceo4 Gerleman Chiropractic Office will be closed j^ Thursday Afternoon, May 20, 21, and 22nd. .^. while attending a Chiropractic Seminar The Office will be Open Monday, May 24th Safeway Shopping Center Henderson 564-2331 WIMTA SILVER STATE POOL SERVICE Serving Boulder City K. Hi-nderson A(II> WA.SHK.S, Fl'MPS. MOTOR.S. ^ IlKATKR. FILTKRS, ^ RKPAIK.S. >I()NTm,V A( (Ol'MS FREE ESTIMATES 293-6842 Super Specials jMONDAYA Week at the Eldorado Casino 5 P.M.-11 PM Spaghetti Night "All you can eat" includes tossed salad bowl, garic toast 2/3^ ^ rTUESDAYPork Chops 2/355 IHINESDAYBBQ Beef Back Ribs 2/3 J5 mURSOAYCountry Fried Steak 2/355 FRIDAYFish Fry "All you care to Eat" 255 OR Roas*^ Prime Rib of Beef 3.75 SATURDAYSteak & Shrimp choice of potatoes, tossed salad bowl "ALWAYS ON SUNDAY" 11 am-ii pm Baked Virginia Ham oi^ 3.75 Roast Tom Turkey served with all the trimmings _*!A11 you care to Eat" 3.50 Eldorado Casino DOWNTOWN HENDERSON i Protsslonl Intunno* Planning tp liA PORTA INSURANCE AGENCY INC. Louli LaPwta 'JMtrvIn ROM • Peter LaPorta Beraie ThUllU • Mike Moq-lttey (Life) 1M Way t t ISISCTroploana LM Vegai 7S3-2MC m^m

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Page 36 Hcndergon Home News and Boulder Cltv Newt Thursday, May 20,19ftS_ AMUII>U>, llA, A>Z.BTL.. SODA POP MMNIC. ASSONTf 0 FLAVORS. 2-LITBN BTL. ALUMINUM FOIL SIMINIC, 17-BO. FOOT NOLL 73* PORK a BEANS 7Qt VAN CAMP'S. JI^I. CAN • 9 949 BEST FOODS MAVONMAISf. n^Z. JAN 1 49 PORK & BEANS VAN CAMP'S, 1S-0Z. CAM VAN CAMP'S. JI^Z. CAN.. POUND CAKE SANA LEE, 1S-0Z. BOX. FROZEN CARROTCAKE SANA LEE. LAYER, 21VOZ. BOX. FROZEN TOMATO JUICE TQe UBBY'S, O-OZ. CAN • 9 CREME COOKIES TO* OENERIC. ia-OZ. PKQ • 9 ORANGE JUICE SMITH S, 11-OZ. CAN, FROZEN CHERRY PIE FILLING COMSTOCK. MOZ. CAN FRENCH FRIES ONE-IDA, POTATOES, 2-LB. BAO, FROZEN.. KITTY QUEEN CAT FOOD. ASSORTED. -0Z CAN 39* ^09 35* SPIRITS BLACK VELVET I [ CANADIAN U WHISKY •1.75-LTR. BTL. ^AAM. •'t umm, FROZEiN FOODS CELESTE PIZZAS FROZEN CANADIAN IACON*S-OZ. DCUI*8^)Z. ^EII0NIr/4-0Z. UU8E*|.4)Z. • 10-02. GENERIC BRANDS COUPON SAVINGS SALAD DRESSING SMITH'S. BLBU CHEESE, 1S-0Z. MR JACK CHEESE LA COCINA. RANDOM WT LB. PILLSBURY COOKIES ^ SUGAR • CHOCOUTE CHIP • 16-OZ. PKG. 439 269 ORTEGA TACO SHELLS QQt • ox OF IS 9 9 TOSTADO SHELLS 7Qe ONTtOA. BOX OF IS f 9 PILLSBURY BISCUITS BUTTERMILK • COUNTRY STYU • 7'/HIZ. MACARONI SALAD QOf FNISM LB. 9 9 269 DRY MILD SALAMI COLUMBUS Vt-LB. MOZZARELLA CHEESE FUU OF FLAVOR LEO'S SLICED MEATS 13^9 BEEF, HAM. TURXEY. S-OZ. PKa I BALL PARK FRANKS MEAT,1-LB.Pa.. PROVOLONECHEESE PIAVONFUL GALLO TABLE WINES £59 ASBONTEOVANWnBB S4TN. W JOHANNA EGBERT WINE ^99 PMSPONTEN, OOLOTNOPCHBN, KABtNETT TSS-ML. *V PAUL MASSON CHAMPAGNE LIEBFRAUMILCH WINE 099 CRINKLE CUTS i19 •CHMITr SOMNE TM^IL. A ONE-IDA. POTATOES. 2-LB. BAG. FNOZBN I JACARE WINES 099 JENO'S PIZZA WMiTi near, CLASSIC nosr, CNVSTAL BLANC I-S-LTN. 9 SAUSAQE, PCPPBNONL COMBO. 12-oz. BOX — TAYLOR CALIF. ELLARS WINE 790-ML.BTL 05 CALIF. CELLARS 95 ni TAYLOR CALIF. CELLARS £99 CHABUS. BUNOUNOV, NOBB'. NHINi WWB t4.TN. 9 f 34.TR.BTL CNABLIS BURGUNDY HOST SARA LEE CAKES CHOCOLATE PUDDING • \AVt4SL BOX I SMITH'S COUPON FLEISCHMANN'Sj MARGARINE || REGULAR QUARTERS •1-LB. CTN. | #491 FRUIT PUNCH CONCENTRATE, i2-0Z. BTL DETERGENT POWOtNED, 42-OZ. BOX WITH 1.00 PVNCMASt • IXCLUOHM UOtWN, 11 roBACco, nuto miu( • umn i mm AMO I J • COUPOM MM CVSTMIBN • M4 r M-M, tMS ] | PAPER TOWELS SINGLE ROU SmiTM'S COUPON 23 I TREE TOP APPLE JUICE 484a. BTL. i#89 ( ,i>inithli wrm 0.00 M/NCNASB • n(Cii/MM UOWON, H TOBACCO, nuio mufumir > mm ANO coupon PIN cuaroMttt • MA v SO-M, taat LEJON CHAMPAGNE 099 STEAK-UMM ^99 GALLON BLEACH 7Q< L Z^^ ,,„,,,, JTJj i PMMCAUrONMA „ rSS4N. iL BANOWCH BTEAR. 2A-OZ.BOX U0OW.1-OAL.JU0 -.. ^.f 9 ^ • i Z^J 9MITH'$ HKMDKR80M HOT \KKRY ENGLISH IFFIN BREAD ^^-^ff-Z/^^l^TH 410 E. TROPICANA • 232 N. JONES 2021 CIVIC CTR. • 390 N. NELUt • ISO t. RANCHO • 37MPLAMINOO • ATSANONIiL • 611SW.TR0PICANA ATJONfS LASVEQAS AT ^MMONT NIAN LAKIMIAO ATtTCWAIIT ATCNARtltTOM AT NELLIS • LA9 VCOAt Li| Vf OAS • LAt VIOA • LA* VtOAt LAS Vf OAt • '.At ViaAt OPtN 7* H0UH8 OPEN 24 HOUMt OPtN 24 HOUMt OMN 24 HOUR* OrEN 24 HOUNt ^ OPEN 24 HOUNt 01 CN 24 HOUNt 4S 1157 i70 S17S MS-3370 • 4S2.471I A •70-B4f4 • 4S1-224B • (71-0t4 HOUNt M-4tt1 22E.OAKEY ATtAtVEOASBLVO LAS VEGAS OPEN 24 HOURS 3SS-2S11 3681 MARYLAND AT TWAIN LAS VEGAS ORCN 24 HOURS 73SSt2l $74 N. EASTERN AT BONANZA LAS VEGAS OPEN 24 HOURS 3t2-S4S4 4962 S. EASTERN ATTROPICAN* LAS VEGAS OPEN 24 HOURS 4SS-2t1S 3830 W.SAHARA AT VALLEY VIEW WONDSRWORLO OPEN 24 HOURS •71-MS 3459 S.JONES AT SPRING MOUNTAIN I LAS VEGAS OPEN 24 HOURS 176-0400 2710N.QREEN VALLEY • AT tUNtfT HENOERtON • OPEN 24 HOURt A. 4S1-04e ^NfCM AMI BWnCTIVB T AM, THUmtOAY, MAY tO, TMHU MIONIONT, NrCONMOAV, MAV M, f UMir AfOMrt Mntuvso Tirvvn ***!,, •^--K' IHII\M1II' trT>

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Page 36 Hcndergon Home News and Boulder Cltv Newt Thursday, May 20,19ftS_ AMUII>U>, llA, A>Z.BTL.. SODA POP MMNIC. ASSONTf 0 FLAVORS. 2-LITBN BTL. ALUMINUM FOIL SIMINIC, 17-BO. FOOT NOLL 73* PORK a BEANS 7Qt VAN CAMP'S. JI^I. CAN • 9 949 BEST FOODS MAVONMAISf. n^Z. JAN 1 49 PORK & BEANS VAN CAMP'S, 1S-0Z. CAM VAN CAMP'S. JI^Z. CAN.. POUND CAKE SANA LEE, 1S-0Z. BOX. FROZEN CARROTCAKE SANA LEE. LAYER, 21VOZ. BOX. FROZEN TOMATO JUICE TQe UBBY'S, O-OZ. CAN • 9 CREME COOKIES TO* OENERIC. ia-OZ. PKQ • 9 ORANGE JUICE SMITH S, 11-OZ. CAN, FROZEN CHERRY PIE FILLING COMSTOCK. MOZ. CAN FRENCH FRIES ONE-IDA, POTATOES, 2-LB. BAO, FROZEN.. KITTY QUEEN CAT FOOD. ASSORTED. -0Z CAN 39* ^09 35* SPIRITS BLACK VELVET I [ CANADIAN U WHISKY •1.75-LTR. BTL. ^AAM. •'t umm, FROZEiN FOODS CELESTE PIZZAS FROZEN CANADIAN IACON*S-OZ. DCUI*8^)Z. ^EII0NIr/4-0Z. UU8E*|.4)Z. • 10-02. GENERIC BRANDS COUPON SAVINGS SALAD DRESSING SMITH'S. BLBU CHEESE, 1S-0Z. MR JACK CHEESE LA COCINA. RANDOM WT LB. PILLSBURY COOKIES ^ SUGAR • CHOCOUTE CHIP • 16-OZ. PKG. 439 269 ORTEGA TACO SHELLS QQt • ox OF IS 9 9 TOSTADO SHELLS 7Qe ONTtOA. BOX OF IS f 9 PILLSBURY BISCUITS BUTTERMILK • COUNTRY STYU • 7'/HIZ. MACARONI SALAD QOf FNISM LB. 9 9 269 DRY MILD SALAMI COLUMBUS Vt-LB. MOZZARELLA CHEESE FUU OF FLAVOR LEO'S SLICED MEATS 13^9 BEEF, HAM. TURXEY. S-OZ. PKa I BALL PARK FRANKS MEAT,1-LB.Pa.. PROVOLONECHEESE PIAVONFUL GALLO TABLE WINES £59 ASBONTEOVANWnBB S4TN. W JOHANNA EGBERT WINE ^99 PMSPONTEN, OOLOTNOPCHBN, KABtNETT TSS-ML. *V PAUL MASSON CHAMPAGNE LIEBFRAUMILCH WINE 099 CRINKLE CUTS i19 •CHMITr SOMNE TM^IL. A ONE-IDA. POTATOES. 2-LB. BAG. FNOZBN I JACARE WINES 099 JENO'S PIZZA WMiTi near, CLASSIC nosr, CNVSTAL BLANC I-S-LTN. 9 SAUSAQE, PCPPBNONL COMBO. 12-oz. BOX — TAYLOR CALIF. ELLARS WINE 790-ML.BTL 05 CALIF. CELLARS 95 ni TAYLOR CALIF. CELLARS £99 CHABUS. BUNOUNOV, NOBB'. NHINi WWB t4.TN. 9 f 34.TR.BTL CNABLIS BURGUNDY HOST SARA LEE CAKES CHOCOLATE PUDDING • \AVt4SL BOX I SMITH'S COUPON FLEISCHMANN'Sj MARGARINE || REGULAR QUARTERS •1-LB. CTN. | #491 FRUIT PUNCH CONCENTRATE, i2-0Z. BTL DETERGENT POWOtNED, 42-OZ. BOX WITH 1.00 PVNCMASt • IXCLUOHM UOtWN, 11 roBACco, nuto miu( • umn i mm AMO I J • COUPOM MM CVSTMIBN • M4 r M-M, tMS ] | PAPER TOWELS SINGLE ROU SmiTM'S COUPON 23 I TREE TOP APPLE JUICE 484a. BTL. i#89 ( ,i>inithli wrm 0.00 M/NCNASB • n(Cii/MM UOWON, H TOBACCO, nuio mufumir > mm ANO coupon PIN cuaroMttt • MA v SO-M, taat LEJON CHAMPAGNE 099 STEAK-UMM ^99 GALLON BLEACH 7Q< L Z^^ ,,„,,,, JTJj i PMMCAUrONMA „ rSS4N. iL BANOWCH BTEAR. 2A-OZ.BOX U0OW.1-OAL.JU0 -.. ^.f 9 ^ • i Z^J 9MITH'$ HKMDKR80M HOT \KKRY ENGLISH IFFIN BREAD ^^-^ff-Z/^^l^TH 410 E. TROPICANA • 232 N. JONES 2021 CIVIC CTR. • 390 N. NELUt • ISO t. RANCHO • 37MPLAMINOO • ATSANONIiL • 611SW.TR0PICANA ATJONfS LASVEQAS AT ^MMONT NIAN LAKIMIAO ATtTCWAIIT ATCNARtltTOM AT NELLIS • LA9 VCOAt Li| Vf OAS • LAt VIOA • LA* VtOAt LAS Vf OAt • '.At ViaAt OPtN 7* H0UH8 OPEN 24 HOUMt OPtN 24 HOUMt OMN 24 HOUR* OrEN 24 HOUNt ^ OPEN 24 HOUNt 01 CN 24 HOUNt 4S 1157 i70 S17S MS-3370 • 4S2.471I A •70-B4f4 • 4S1-224B • (71-0t4 HOUNt M-4tt1 22E.OAKEY ATtAtVEOASBLVO LAS VEGAS OPEN 24 HOURS 3SS-2S11 3681 MARYLAND AT TWAIN LAS VEGAS ORCN 24 HOURS 73SSt2l $74 N. EASTERN AT BONANZA LAS VEGAS OPEN 24 HOURS 3t2-S4S4 4962 S. EASTERN ATTROPICAN* LAS VEGAS OPEN 24 HOURS 4SS-2t1S 3830 W.SAHARA AT VALLEY VIEW WONDSRWORLO OPEN 24 HOURS •71-MS 3459 S.JONES AT SPRING MOUNTAIN I LAS VEGAS OPEN 24 HOURS 176-0400 2710N.QREEN VALLEY • AT tUNtfT HENOERtON • OPEN 24 HOURt A. 4S1-04e ^NfCM AMI BWnCTIVB T AM, THUmtOAY, MAY tO, TMHU MIONIONT, NrCONMOAV, MAV M, f UMir AfOMrt Mntuvso Tirvvn ***!,, •^--K' IHII\M1II' trT>

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Page 38 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday, May 20,1982 Thuriday, May 20,198X iienoergon Home News and Bouidcr tuy Nc l-nge 30 Tax Changes Outfined By Cannon ItGAlNOTia U6AIN0TKE LEGAL MOTKE lEGAL NOTKt lEGAl NOTia lEOAl NOTICE lEGAl NOTICE LIGAl NOTKI USVEGAS---Nely S140 mlllioo in federal slot machine taxes have been retained in Nevada since 1972 and a tax cut worth more than $10 mUlion a year is nearing congressional approval, Sea. Howard Cannon said Wednesday. Cannon's remarks to gaming conference at the Las Vegas Hilton were delivered by former Gov. Grant Sawyer because Cannon had to return to Washington for the first round of the 1983 budget battle. The senator's address centered on changes in federal tax pfilicies that have occurred \n recent years. Cannon authored the 1971 change in the S2S0 slot tax which allowed 80% of. the proceeds to remain, in the state for educational use. He also sponsored 1978 legislation that raised the state's amount, in two stages, to 100. Nevada received $21 million in slot taxes in the fiscal year that ended June 30. for a total of S137 miUion since 1972. The money is used for support of public education, for University of J^evada building prolecta and for construction of sports pavilions on the Las Vegas and Reno camputes of the ^ University. .On the. horizon la v^ual elimination of two federal laxes on sports betting that cost Nevada businesses, more than $10 million last vear. Cannon stated that a House-Senate Conference Committee was scheduled. today to iake up his bill which reduces a 2% federal excise tax on wagers to one-quarter of one per cent and a $500 occupational tax on employees of soorts betting establish* menta to $50. The Senate approved Cannon's bill last year and final acceptance by both houaes is expected, when Ahp conference. committee completes its review. "It has taken a lot of persuasion and just plain 'pesterins'.to get the Senate to tocus on these tax inequities and do something about them." Cannon said. "I think I have helped open the door for consideration of these issues and it is a door I intend to push open wider and wider in the future." Down On Farm Solution For Crime "Put'em down on the farm." That was the response given by 20 year veteran law enforcement officer Lt. Dale D. Davis to the question posed by area business representatives as to what can be done to rid the community, of the hordes of hookers and pimps who accost tourists and locals alike nightly on the Strip. "There is no magical way and certainly no mysterious jsolutions" the candidate for sheriff explained," just Jiard work, determination, patience, and the proper use of police personnel," Davis said. The farm Davis referred to is the old Las Vegas Rehab farm located on Vegas Valley Drive east of Nellis Boulevard. Built by the State of Nevada as a maximum detention facility, it was once used by the Las Vegas Police Department to house vagrants,, drunks and other misdemenants. Currently Metro has a shooting range on the premises and there are laundry facilities for the county jaiL Although the City of Las Ve^as owns the propjerty, according to Davis.the sheriff has the right to use the farm.for any activipr that it was used for in 1973, before the meraer which produced Metro. "The fact is that McCarthy at one time used the. facility to books hookers," Davis said, "but backed away from it when a few lawyers representing hookers and pimps complained to the sheriff," Davis charged. "The situation is ideal and the location of. the farm is perfect," Davis explained," all you have to do is p\it a small task force on the streets, keep rotating them, and theyjire a sure bet to be accosted by the hookers. Then you pile them into the big Metro bus together with any pimps you can find and take them out to the farm for booking," Davis continued. The amount of time consumed in driving to the iarm and in the booking process will kill the evening for the hookers u %nd means a loss of income to the pimps." According to the. veteran Metro Officer," the only people you .will be inconveniencine are the hookers, pimps, and some criminal lawyers, and. if you have to make more than one trip a night, that's okay, too," Davis added. Davis, who^has, 14 years of service wUh Las Vegas Police Department and Metro said that as time passed, lie would change booking places to keep the hookers, pimps, and their lawyers guessing." I'd dump them off anywhere, within the boundaries of the county for booking," Davis said, and that could mean between Jean and Stateline, between Indian Springs and nowhere, and other out qif j the way loca^oiis. All we need is 1 mobile bookbg office, take them m, book them and let them find their way back.to town." Davis admitted that it would take cooperation of the District Attorney's office, the Justices .of the Peace, alona with the support or Ihe community." McCarthy can't get it on bficau&e instead, of seeking cooperation he has blamed every agency in the town for his own ineptness and lack of ability of his high, echelon aides in dealing with police problems as well evidenced by the poor record of shoddy law enforcement compiled by the current Metro administrative team," Davis concluded. .*'^ f^^ iv> \> REPELING AT KEYHOLE CANYON -These young people were seen learning to repel down a mountainside at Keyhold Canyon recently. The canyon is located not far from Henderson and is a nice drive through the countryside. You should get directions before going, however, as there are no signs. The scenery is rugged and beautiful. Jim Dyer Baseball Tryouts Begin Tomorrow Tryouts for the Jim Dyer ising career in baseball American Baseball Team came to an end as his life will begin at 5 p.m. Friday on was ended by cancer. Western High School's WarThe Jim Dyer Team was rtor Tield basebati formed that summerand has^ diamond. An additional trybeen in operation ever out day is scheduled for Saturday at 5 p.m. and practice for both A and B teams begins Monday at Warrior Field. The Jim Dyer Americans Baseball Team will begin its fifth season of play in June of this summer. The players on the team are college age (19-23). The team was named in memory of Jim Dyer, an outstanding student and allaround athlete who graduated from Las Vegas High School in 1974. After attending college and playing baseball in Arizona for a year, Jim signed a professional baseball contract with the New York Mets. In April of 1978 his promsince. Over this timl", numerous semi-pro and amateur baseball teams from out of state have played the Jim Dyer Club in Las Vegas. Teams who have played here include: Smithfield Blue Sox, Smithfield, Utah; Riverside West, Riverside. Calif.; Whittier Baseball Club, Whittier, Calif.; Azuza Baseball Club, Azuza, Calif.; Jonco Giants, American Forks, Utah; S.L.O. Blues, San Luis Obispo, Calif.; San Bernardino Indians, San Bernardino, Calif.; Bakersfield Semi-Pros, Bakersfield. Calif.; Clovis Mavericks. Fresno. Calif.; LaHabra Zephyrs, San Diego, Calif.; Santa Maria Saints, Santa Maria, Calif.; Mexico City Reds, Mexico City, Mexico; J.C. Collegian, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Mesa Pistons, Mesa, Ariz.; Village Pizza, Phoenix, Ariz, and" others. Most of the players are local high school graduates who are currently attending and playing baseball at some college or university. The team gives these young players an opportunity to continue improving their baseball skills throughout the summer months when school is not in progress. Competition is extremely keen at the college level and only highly dedicated players who are willing to virtually play year around can successfully compete in college. This past summer, the players represented 14 different junior colleges, colleges or universities. Ken Elsee, the AUAmerican pitcher from UNLV and drafted into the Houston Astros organization, was a walk on and pitched for the Jim Dyer Club in the summer of 1978. Ove rthep a St threere^arsr 194 players have had tryouts for the team, 119 have played in one or more games over this period of time. In the summer of 1978 the .team was invited to participate in the National Baseball Congress Tournament held in Wichita, Kan sas each summer for the 32 outstanding amateur baseball teams in the nation. This tournament began in 1936 and many major leaguers of today have played in this tournament. Satchel Paige, the great black pitcher, pitched a nohitter in the 1936 tournament The Jim Dyer Club of 1978 came in 11th out of the 32 teams with wins over good baseball teams from Georgia and Tennessee. Tfiink it would make any difference if W6 could \/C)te?' -r4Why Support A Blood Drive? If you or a loved one entered the hospital and needed blood, would it be readily available? This question is the vital concern of United Blood Services, our community blood center which is responsible for supplying the blood needs of Boulder City and the Las Vegas area. Your blood center is an affiliate of Blood Services, a system of not-for-profit blood centers located in 12 states. Combined, these centers serve the blood needs of patients in over 1200 hospitals. In order to make blood available to patients who need it. Blood Services must recruit blood donors draw blood, perform tests and typing procedures and distribute the blood to area hospitals as needed. To fully meet the requests of physicians in our local hospitals and surrounding area, blood of every type must be available at all times. This blood must come from volunteer donors who are willing to give of themselves to meet day-to-day blood needs. There's no substitute for blood; the human body is still the only source. If you believe that your immediate need for blood is remote, consider that each day more than 24,000 units of blood are transfused in the I'nited States over 12 million units per year. And that number is increasing rapidly. Yet it is estimated that less than 3 percent of the population donates blood to meet these needs. Donating blood is a safe, simple and satisfying experience. Most"^ healthy persons between the ages of 17 and 66 are generally accepted as blood donors. And every volunteer donor helps meet a vital need in this community. United Blood Services of Southern Nevada will hold a blood drive here at Boulder City Elks Lodge on May 20. 1982. For your information Facts to Remember Q. How many people donate blood? A. 3 out of 100. Q. How often do people need blood? A. 90 out of 100 people will need blood in their life times. Q. How much blood is needed for heart surgery? A.An adult can use as much as 20 pints and a child about seven. Q. How much time does it take to give a pint of blood? : '' A. Approximately 5-8 minutes. Q. Why does it take approximately 30 minutes of work? A. Before you can give, we give you a miniphysical to make sure you can give, and after you're done you will have some refreshments Q. What if I have never donated before? A. Fantastic! Be a first time donor. Most first time donors feel fine after donating. Q. How often can a person donate a year? A. Every 8 weeks. Q. How quickly will my blood be used? A. We will use it in 2 to 3 days. AQ What are the chances of my blood saving someone's life? A. Very good. Consider i that patients lives are very often dependent upon surgeries, and that surgeries can happen only when blood is available. Q. Are you going to charge a patient for the blood I donate? A. No. We are a nonprofit community blood center and don't charge for the blood itself The patient will be charged our exact cost of drawing, testing, processing, storing and shipping the blood. Q. How much blood do I have, do I give,and how long does it take to replace? A. You have about 11 or 12 pints, we take one. and your body replaces the entire volume in 24 hours. Lough £)ut "1 went to see a spiritualist last night." "Was he good?" "No, just medium." • • • "What is the outstanding contribution that chemistry has given to the world?" Blondes! Picture Mounl Everest capped by three Empire State Buildings. That's about 33,400 feet-and that's how Tar underground a natural gas well now being drilled at the Anadarko Basin in Oklahoma, is expected to extend. If it does, the well will set a new Free World drilling depth record. Drilling to such depth, is aided by TRW Inc. fluid end parts, centrifugal pumps, and butterfly valves. Those products are used in the two mud pumps in the well's circulating system. The mud pump is to a drilling operation what the heart is to the human body: it circulates fluid— the chemical-based fluid commonly called drilling mud — down the hole to lubricate and cool the drill bit, flush material from the hole, help form and maintain the hole, and prevent possible blowouts. Wells such as the one at the Anadarko JBaCin are known in the drilling indus try as "ultra dcpp, i P America is now drilling what may be the deepest well in history —a well as deep as the height of Mount Everest, topped by three Empire State Buildinas. deeper than 20,000 feet. Of the almost 2 million wells that have'been drilled since the industry was born, approximately 500 qualify as ultra-deep, However, more ultra-deep wells will likely be drilled in the future. The reason? Most of the easily recoverable oil and gas deposits have already been tapped. Quips one wildcatter: "With the current revved-up drive to find new sources of energy, there's almost no limit to the depths that the in duttry will go." Certainly the Anadarko Basin well is proof of thai ^1 rvsuc NoncB OBOINANCI NO. Ml AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY or HINDIBMN, NIVADA. • 'AN OIDINANCI AMINOINQ BBNDBHON MVNiaPAL CODB CHAPTBM 4.M AND 4.N A8 ISTAIUMBD •Y ODDINANCB NO. IM BY SBTTINC rOKtU CHANGB8 IN TBMrOBABY BVSINBSS LICRNSB, BVaiNBM LICBNBB SUPBBVIMB 0VTIE8, BEDBFINING -BOOKBECPBR' PBU AND ADDING "BBOBBB" TO THE PBB SCHBDULB; AND OTHBB MATTEU BBLATINGTHBUrrO." The abwrt BlU Ne. 411 sad reregeleg Ordiuace wee Hret IM'speecd ead read by UU U the City CeeMll ef Iks City ef Heii4enea,Nevate.a Afril M. INI, wkicb was § Begelar MesttM er Ike CeMlI aB4 referred U Ike MtowiM Cea• Itter ••COUNaL Al A WBOLT' fer receauMBdetlea. PVBLIC NOTICE !• kefeby llviB Ikat tke tyHrlllea ctes tl Ike ebeve • el U eeJ Ordtuacc are • vallaUe fSr • • srectle* by sU iBtereKed fulie* al tke Offlce tt Ike City ClMTk, 141 Water Slreet, Headersee, Nevadaj emd that saM Ordlnaacc Ne. Ml was fnpoted fer adoption by CeaDcllmas Price aed aeceaded by CouBcUBaan AnderteD ee Ike 17th day ef May INt, and •defied by Ike feilewlsi reU cell vele: VntlBI AYE: NAYOB LEBOY ZIBE; COUNCIL MBMBBB8 LOBNA BE8TEB80N, BENT ANDEB80N, GARY PBICE AND CLOYD LOVITT. VotlBg NAY: NONE. Ahseal: NONE. LEROY ZIKE, MAYOR ATTEST: PPBOTHY A. VONDEN•BINK, CMC CITY CLEBK H Nay M, INS PUBUC NOTICE OBOINANCE NO. MS AN OBDINANCB OF THE CITY OF BENDEB80N, NEVADA. "AN OBDINANCE CONCERNING HENDERSON, NEVADA, LOCAL IMPROVEMENT DI8TBICT NO.SM; (QBEEN VALLEY); CONFIBMING THE PBOCEEDINGS TAKEN IN PBOVIDING FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A SEWER PROJECT AND A WATER PROJECT IN HENDERSON, NEVADA IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. •U; PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE COST AND EXPENSES OF THE IMPBOVEMENTS; ASSESSING THE COST OF THE IMPB0VEMENT8 AGAINST THE ASSESSABLE LOTS AND TRACTS OF LAND BENEFITED BY THE IMPBOVEMENTS; DESCRIBING THE NANNEB FOR THE COLLECTION AND PAYMENT OF THE ASSESSMENTS; PBOVIDING PENALTY FOR DELINQUENT PAYMENTS; RATIFYING, APPROVING AND CONHRMING ACTION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN IN CONNECTION WITH THE DI8TBICT; PBBSCBIBING DETAILS IN CONNECTION THEBBWITH AND OTHBB MATTEBS BBLATING THEBETO; AND PBOVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE FOB THE OBDINANCE" The abeve BUI Ne. ttl and feregelBg Ordlaaece was flrst proposed and reed by title U tke City CeuBcil of the City el Henderson, Nevada, on May S, IHZ, whick was a Begnlar Meeting ef tke Council and referred U the (eilewing Cemmlttec: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLE" for recemmendaUon. PUBLIC NOTICE Is kereby given that Ihe typewritten copies of the above menlioncd Ordinance are available fer Inspection by all inleretled parlies al the Office ef the City Clerk. MS Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that aald Ordinance No. MS was proposed fbr ado p tion by Council• aa Levitt and seconded by CouBcllDun Price on the 17th day of May INt. and adopted by the rallowing roll call veto: Voting AYE: MA YOB LEBOY ZIKE; COUNCILMEMBBBS LOBNA KE8TER80N, BENT ANDEBSON, GABY PBICE AND CLOYD LOVITT. VoUng NAY: NONE. Absent: NONE. LEBOY ZIKE, MA YOB ATTEST: DOBOTHY A. VONDBNBBINK,CMC CITYCLEBB H • May M, lt PUBUC NOTICE OBMNANCB NO. IM AN OBDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDBBSON. NBVADA. "AN OBDINANCB OF THE CITY OF HENDBBSON, NEVADA. AMENDING OBDINANCB m TO COBRBCT THE INCBBA8B8 IN MONTHLY WATBB SERVICE CHABGES AND FEES, B8PECIALLY BBLATING TO SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENCES METBB SIZES OF LESS THAN ONE (1) INCH AND PBOVIDING OTHBB MATTEBS BBLATING THEBETO WITH BESPECT TO HENDBBSON MUNICIPAL CODE SECTION IS.M.IN AS ORIGINALLY ESTABLISHED BY OBOINANCE 7M, BECTION S. The abeve BUI Ne. 41* and foregoing Ordinance wes flnt proposed and reed by tlUe to the City Council *f the City of Rendersen. Nevada, en May I, INS, which wes a Begnlar Meeting ef Ike Ceaacll and referred le tke iWlewIng CesunlHee: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLB" fbr recoBsaendatlon. PUBUC NOTICICB li kereby given Ikat Ike typewritten copies ef tke abeve aentlened Ordinance arc avaiUble fbr Inspection by all interested fv tiee at the Offlce of Uie City Clerk, MS Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. >M wu prepoeed for sdopllon by Councilnun Anderson and seconded by CeuncilBsan Levitt en the 17th day of May, INS, and adopted by Uie rollowing roll call vole: Voting AYE: MA YOB LEBOY ZIKE; COUNCILMEMBBBS LORNA KE8TER80N. KENT, ANDEBSON. GABY PBICE AND CLOYD LOVITT. Voting NAY: NONE. Absent: NONE. LEBOY ZIKE, MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC CITY CLERK H May S8,1I8S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTIcr IS HEBEBY GIVEN that Ihe City Council ef the City of HcndorsoB proposed by reading in UUe Uie fbllowlng Ordinance at ils May 17lh, l8t Meeting. enliUed: BILL NO. 4tS "AN ORDINANCE DESIGNATED AS THE "JULY IMS BOND ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE BY THE CITY OF HENDERSON. IN CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. OF ITS NEGOTIABLE. COUPON, GENERAL OBLIGATION (LIMITED TAX) MUNICIPAL UTILITY (SANITARY SEWEB) BONDS. SEBIES JULY IISS (ADDITIONALLY SECURED BY PLEDGED REVENUES), IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF SZ.SM.ON; PROVIDING THAT THE BONDS MAY BE EVIDENCED BY A SINGLE. REGISTERED BOND (WITHOUT COUPONS) IN THE SAME PRINCIPAL AMOUNT: PROVIDING FOR THE LEVY AND COLLECTION OF AN ANNUAL AD VALOREM TAX FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE BONDS; PBOVIDING DTHER DETAILS CONCEBNING THE BONDS AND SUCH FACILITIES; ADDITIONALLY SECURITY THEIR PAYMENT BY A PLEDGE OF REVENITES DERIVED FROM THE OPERA TION OF THE CITY'S JOINT 8ANITABY SEWEB AND WATER UTILITY SYSTEM: RATIFYING ACTION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN RY THE CITY AND ITS OFFICERS; AND BY DECLABING THAT THIS ORDINANCE PERTAINS TO THE SALE, ISSUANCE AND PAYMENT OF THE BONDS, PROVIDING FOR ITS ADOPTION AS IF AN EMERGENCY EXISTS. which has been refered to a Committee of the Council as s Whole fer Ihe study and recommendation and a copy of said Ordinance has been nicd wiUi the CltyOerk for general public ecruUny. The Commitlee Meeting wiU be held June 7, \Mt at tM p.m., immediately preceding the Regular Meeting at 7:M p.m. In Ihe Council Chamber al City Hall. MS Water Street. The Council will consider this Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting of the City Council. June 7, l(8t; and in any case will adept or reject this Ordinance witkln Sgdaya. DATED this 17th day of May IMt. and published May M, IMt, In the Henderson Home News. (s) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENHMayMlNS • "Y^JISS ^at^ Cmy0ii9efieett?^ Just as the world-wide j;:redit war is heating up, the U.S. seems to b disarming. Oj^r most potent weapon — the Export-Import Bank — no longer has sufficient funds to permit American mapuftcturers to aggressively go i fter many export opportunities. Nor does it have competitive interest rates to match those offered by the foreign competition. Some legislators may even want to do away with the Eximbank — one of the only government agencies that has never cost taxpayers anything. In fact, it has returned more than one billion dollars in dividends over the years to the U.S. Treasury. American companies and labor are working to convince Washington legislators that strengthening Exim bank's lending authority would be good for our nation's economy. We'd gain jobs and tax revenues. To make your voice heard, write your Congressmen at the US Senate, Washington D.C. 20510, and the House of Representatives, Washing ton, D.C. 20515. H PUBLIC NOTICE NOnCB U HEREBY flIVBN thai Ihe City Council ef Ike City ef Mendersen prepesod by reading In UUe tke fellewing Ordinance at Ils Mey ITtk, INS Mpbting, enUlled: BILL NO. 4tt "AN OBDINANCE BEPEALING HENDBBSON MUNICIPAL CODB CHAPTEB 1S,48 AS ESTABLISHED BY OBDINANCE S77; AMENDING TITLE II BY ADDING THEBETO A NEW CHAPTEB CODIFIED AND DESIGNATED CHAPTEB 1S.41 BBLATING TO SIGNS: SETTING FOBTH PURPOSES, DEFINITIONS, SIGN BEQUIBENENT8 AND PEBMIT8; DELINEATING AND DESIGNATING TYPE OF SIGNS FOB PEBMITS: ADMINI8TBATION AND ENFOBCEMENT; ESTABU8HING A PENALTY FOB VIOLATION OF THE OBDINANCE: AND OTHBB MATTEBS BELATING THEBETO." wkick kas been referred to a Committee of the Council as a Whole for study and recomnendaUen and a copy of said Ordinance has been Hied with the City Clerk fbr general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting wiU be held June 7, latt al *.H pm.. ImMdialely preceding UM Begnlar Meeting at 7:N p.m. in Ihe Council Chamber al City Hall, 141 Water Street. Tke Council wiU consider this Ordinance for adoption at the Begular Meetlag ef Ihe City CeuBcU, June 7, lS8t; and in any case will adept or reject this Ordinance wilhin St day*. DATED Uils 17th day of May, INS. and published May tO, list. In Uie Henderaen Home New*. (s) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CITY CLERK (DISTRICT COURT SEAL) H May M, INS PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN tkal Ihe City Council of the City of Henderton proposed by reading in titie the following Ordinance at its May 17tb, IMS Meeting, cnlllled: BILL NO. 411 "AN OBDINANCE EXTENDING THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDBBSON BY ANNEXING THEBETO THAT POBTIONOF THE SOUTH HALF (SH) OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NWV4) OF SECTION 13, TOWN 2S SOUTH. RANGE gt EAST, M.D.M.. COUNTY OF CLARK, STATE OF NEVADA. CONTAINING AN AREA OF APPROXIMATELY 1< ACRES." which has been referred to a Committee of the Council as a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy ef said Ordinance has been filed with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee NeeUng will be held June 7, list at tM p.m., immedatejy preceding Ihe Regular Meeting at 7:00 p.m. in Ihe Council Chamber at City Hall, S43 Water Street. The Council will consider Ibis Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting of the City Council. June 7. IMS: and In any cue will adopt or reject this Ordinance within 30 days. DATED this 17th day of May IMS. and published May 20. INS, in Uic Henderson Home News. (s) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK. CMC, L____ CITY CLERK (DISTRICT COURT SEAL) H May SO. IMS PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the Oty of Henderson proposed by reading in titie Uie fellewing Ordinance al its May 17th, l8t Meeting. entUled: BILL NO. 4S3 "AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. ON OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVADA, CODIFIED AS HENDBBSON MUNICIPAL CODE S.SI ESTABLISHING THE CHARGES TO BE ASSESSED FOB THE OPEBATION AND MAINTENANCE OF AMBULANCE SERVICES IN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA BY INCBEA8ING CHABGES FOR SERVICES, WITHIN AND OUTSIDE CITY LIMITS AND MEDICAL SUPPLIES AND PROVIDING OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO." which has been referred to a Committee of the Council as a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of said Ordinance has been Hied with Ihe City Ocrk for general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting wiU be held June 7, 1182 at l:M p.m., immediately preceding the Regular Meeting at 7:M p.m. In Ihe Council Chamber at City Hall, SIS Water Street. The Council will consider this Ordinance for adoption al the Regular Meeting of the City Council. June 7, INS; and in any case will adopt or reject Uils Ordinance within SO days, DATED this 17th day of May. INS. and published May M. INS. in Ihe Henderson Home News. (SI Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBBINK, CMC CITYCLEBB .(SEAL) H May M, 1B8S I • Tips for returning from an outdoor trip alive: ^Always carry survival gear. Listen to radio weather reports. Inform someone of your destination and when you expect to return. Visually check the sky frequently for storm clouds. Establish campsites on high ground. PUBUC NOTICE NOTICE 18 HEBEBY OIVBN Ikat tke City CeuBcU ef Ihe aiy f Henderton prepesed by rendIng In title the fallowing Ordinance al its May 17. INS Meeting, enUUed: BILL NO. 4M "AN OBDINANCB AMENDING HENDBBSON MUNICIPAL CODE IS SETTING FOBTH A NEW SECTION TO BE CODIFIED AND DESIGNATED ISM DEAUNG WITH FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION DETAILING DEFINITIONS, PBOCEDUBES AND OTHBB MATTEBS RELATING THEBETO which has been referred to a Committee of the Council a* a Whole fer study and recemmcndaUoD and a copy of said Ordinance has been nied with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting will be held June 7, IMS at 8:M p.m.. Immediately preceding the Begular Meeting at 7:N p.m. in the Council Chamber at City Hall. 843 Water Street. The Council will consider Ibis Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting ef the City Council. June 7. IMS; and in any case will adept or reject this Ordinance within M days. DATED this I7th day of Nay, IMS. and published May Z%. lies, in the Henderson Home News. (s) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOBOTHY A. VONDENBBINK. CMC, CITY CLERK (SEAL) H May M, IMS NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR PERMISSION TO APPROPRIATE THE PUBLIC / WATERS OF THE STATE OF NEVADA May 11, IMS Application No. 43773 Notice is hereby given thai on the Slst day of Nay 1881, Samuel L. Welpman of Las Vegas Stale of Nevada made application to the State Engineer of Nevada for penniiiion to appropriate O.S of a second foot of the public waters of the SUlc of Nevada. Diversion Is to be made feom an underground source al a point located wilhin Uic NW^ SEW, SecUon 8, TS3S., R81E., MDBAM. or at a point from which the SSk comer of said Section • bears S. 38* OS' SO" W., a distance of l.gSS.OO feet. Water will be used for quasi muhiclpal and domestic piirposes from January 1st to December 3Ist of each year. Dale of nrst Publication May SO, 188S. Dale of last publication June 17.1B8S. Signed: Peter G. Morro* PETEB G. NORROS. P.E. State Engineer B • May SO, 27. June 3. 10. 17, IIM • FILED MAY 7 3:97 PN 'M ,; LORETTA BOWMAN BY DOROTHEA RA8QUI CASE NO. P14M8 IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLARK NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HALVOR BENNlON. Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Ihe undersigned has been duly appointed and qualined by the Eighth Judicial District Court on the llth day of April. IMS as Executor of the Eilate of HALVOR RENNION, deceased. All creditors having claims against said Estate are required to file the same with the proper vouchers attached with the Clerli of the Court within sixty (M) days after the f^rst publication of this Notice. DATED this llth day of April. II8S. (SI Douglas Pcndielon Bennion DOUGLAS PENDLETON BENNION Submitted by (8) Steven J. Parsons. STEVEN J. PAB80NS. ESQ. Attorney for Executor P.O. Box IM Boulder City. Nevada 888N B • May M, S7, June 3, 188S CITY OF BOULDEB aTY A Municipal Corporation NO Arlsena Street Boulder City. Nevada 880W NOTICE INVITING BIDS The City of Boulder Cily, Nevada will receive hide for the following: ELECTBICAL CABLE Speclflcatlons and bid forms may he obuined al Ihe Finance DcparlmcBl. City Hall. tM ArUena Street, Boulder Cily, Nevada 880N. Sealed bids for such will be received al the ofnce of Ihe Finance Director unlil SM P.M. P.D T. on June 1. IMS when they will he opened and read aloud In Ihe City Council Chamber*. Boulder Cily retains the right to reject any and all bids. to waive any Informality In bidding, and to accept any bid daemtd esost advantageoui le the City. (SI Bebert E. Beyer ROBEBT E. BOYEB Finance Director B May SO, 1S8S I, MkhaclMosser. asoTMay M. do hereby give neUcc that I am no longer responsible fer debit other then my own. (s) MIckaci James Matter MICHAEL JAMES MOWEB H • May M, S7. June S. IMS FILED APR. M 10:11 AM M LORETTA BOWMAN, CLEBK BY MOBOAN LEA CLABKB CASE NO. D4SS87 VII P IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTBICT COUBT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOB THE COUNTY OF CLABK PETITION TO TEBMINATE PABENTAL BIGHTS IN THE MATTEB OF THE PARENTAL RIGHTS A8 'TO KIMBEBLY ANNE BICHAR080N and KABLA MABIE RICHARDSON, Miners. Tke Petilion ef LUCILLE ROSE BBUNO respeclfnliy shows. I. Thai Uicrc retidet within the County of Clarh, Stale ef NeVeda. two miner children, lo-wil: KIMBEBLY ANNE RICHARDSON, hern October II. iro. and KARLA MARIE RICHARDSON, born July 17, 1174. who should be declared free from the custody and control of their father, RODNEY DEAN RICHARDSON. II. That RODNEY DEAN RICHARDSON, the father of said children. Is an unHt parent la that he has willfully felled and refuted to provide them with prefer care, gnidancc and support. in. Thai the tald minor children, al the lime ef Ihe niing ef Ihit Petilion. reilde with their mother al S88S Jecelyn Drive, Las Vegas, Nevada MISS. IV. That the natural mother ef the said miner children has remarried to LAWRENCE FRANCIS BBUNO, JR. and lives at SMS Jocelyn Drive, Las Vegas, Nevada, and was awarded Ihe custody of said minor children in a decree of divorce entored in Uie Eighth Judicial District Couri of (he Stole of Nevada, in and for the County ofClark, June so, 1I7S, and that Ihe father of tald children hit hid no contoci or vititolion with them and bai paid nothing toward their auppori and maintonanee tince that lime. WHEREFORE, Petilioner prayt that Ihe Couri order a lermioallon of Ihe parental rights of RODNEY DEAN RICHARDSON at to the tald minor rhildren, and for fbriher relief that may be proper In the premitet. (II John F. MarchUno, JOHN F MARCHIANO, ESQ. Attorney for Petilioner M3 Wator Street Henderton, NV 8N1S STATE OF NEVADA COUNTY OF CLARK SS: LUCILLE ROSE BRUNO, being first duly sworn, deposes and says: Thai she Is the Petitioner in the above entitled maltor; that she bis read the foregoing Petition to Terminato Parental RighU and knows the eontonU thereof: and that the tame li true of her own knowledge, except at to thote matteri therein alleged on information and belief, and at to those matter* the believet it to be true. (tl Lucille Rote Bruno LUCILLE BOSE BBUNO SUBSCRIBED AND SWOBN to before me Ihit Sllh day of April, IMS. Monica M. Simmoni MONICA M. SIMMONS NOTABY PUBUC H-Mayl3,M,S7,June3,188S FILED MAY 7 11:M AM tt LORETTA BOWMAN, CLEBK BY MABGO CBOOKS CASE NO. D43S37 VII P IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLARK NOTICE IN THE NATTER OF THE PARENTAL RIGHTS AS TO KIMBEBLY ANNE RICHARDSON and KARLA MARIE RICHARDSON, Minort. TO: RODNEY DEAN RICHARDSON, the father of Ihe above named minor children, and to all pertoni related to Ihe above named minort: YOU ARE HERERY NOTIFIED Uial there hat been nied In the above enlllled Court a Petition praying fer the termination of parenul rights over Ihe above named minor children, and that the Petition hat been tct for hearing befbrc Ihit Court al Ihe Courireom thereof al Ut Vega*, Nevada, en the Mb day of July, 18B. at the hour of 8:M o'clock A.M.. at which time and place you are required to be pretcnl if you dctirc to oppoec the Petition. DATED Ihit 7th day of May. list (a) Leretto Rewman LORETTA ROWMAN. CLERK Bydl Marge Creek* MARCO CBOOKS DISTBICT COURT SEAL H-MaylS.M,n,JnneS.lB8S OFFiaAL NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids, ankject to Ike ceBdltlen* centelned In tke Centred Decumento. will ke received at Ike office ef Ike Henderson City Clerk, 843 Water Slreet. Henderson, Neveda. 8MIS up to Uw kenr and date stipnlaled below, at which time the bid* will be publicly opened by the City Ocrk. Tke name and addreas ef Ike Ridder witk RM TlUe and Contract Numker meat appear en Ike eutoide ef tke aeeled envelope. CONTRACT NAME: IMPBOVEMENT OF SUNSET BOAD BOULDEB HIGHWAY TO HARBN DRIVE Cenlract Niuiber; 81-8S|^1 Bid Opening: 8:N P.M.. June S, Ion, ConferoMe Boom, City Hall, 843 Wator Slreet. Henderson, Nevada 8M18. Lecelton: Tke work will be perfoTMod In Sections 1 and 2, Township SS South. Baoge U East, M.D M.. in the City of Henderson, Clerh County, Nevada. Description ef Work: The work will consist of the Improvement of Sunset Road and realignment ef Burnt Road, iooluding removal of eiiiling roadway and coniiructtoo of pavement, curb and gutter, median, storm drslnage facilities, slreet lights, traffic signals, sad related Items as required by the Plans and Speciflcallons. Bids must be submitted on the form fernished by (he City and accompanied by i ccrtined check, bid bond, or ciihleri check in the amount of nve percent(t%lof the total amount of Ihe bid, made payable to the City of Hcndersen. The *uccei*flil bidder will be required to fttmleb al bit own expentc a Matorlalt k Labor Bond in Ihe amount of not loot than one-hundred percent <180%) of Uie contracted price. A Fiithhl Performance Bond In the amount of not leit than one-hundred percent (100% i of Ihe contract price and i Guaranty Bond in the amount of not less than ooe-buodred percent (100^1 of thr contract price. Guaranty ihall be for one (II year from the date of completion. Bid formt and Contract Decumenti may be obtoined al the City Hall Annex, 22S Uad Slreet, Henderton, Nevada. Each tcl of plant and speciHcalions may be purchased for the price of TWENTY DOLLARS (ISO.OO), with NO REFIISD. If mailed, an additional 15 00 set will be charged for poiUge and handling. Copies of the Plans and Specifications are available for Inspection at Ihe Public Works Department. Current U.S. Labor Department Wage Schedule* shall be observed. The Cily reserves Uie right to reject any or all bidi, or waive any informalities aad-or irregularities in Ihe Bidding. The lowest retponilve ind retponsible bidder will be Judged on the bitit of price, performince on previous conlrarts, bidder's qualinealions, and the bctt interetl of Ihe public each of tuch factors being cootidered. A pre-bid conference will be held in the Conference Room in the Cily Hall Annex, 22S Uad atreet. Henderton, Nevada at: 11:00 A.M.. May 2S. 1982. (tl Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDEN BRINK. CMC City Clerk H May 13. M. 27, June 3.1N2 NOTICE OF HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Nevada Induttrial Committlon will bold a public hearing at 1:30 P.M. on May M. 1882. in the Training Boom of the Nevada Induttrial Commiislon. SIS East Musser Street, Csrton City, Nevada. The purpose of the bearing will be to receive cemmentt from all interetted perteni regarding Ihe reviiiea of Begulatlon U. If no peraon. who will be directly affected by the propoied agency action, appear* to requet time to make an oral prctentotioB. the Nevada Induttrial Committlon may proceed immediately to act upon any written tubmltdont. The public hearing wiU be held to eentider a revitlon of Nevada Induttrial CommitiloB Begulatton U concerning ReIrotpeclive Reting Plan and Cath Flow OpttAt. The purpete of the retroofffHire rating plan is to promote accident prevention and ssfciy conKiousness among employers, and to estoblish equity between the premiums charged individual emplojrers who qualify for raUng. A retrospecUve rating is a plan or method which permits adtustmcnt of the nnal premium fer a risk on the batit of its own lees expcriCBce subject to maximum aud aUBlmum llmlto. Four optloBal plaBS are avallahiA caah flow option is an optlOBal method of premium payment which aaay be elected by qualified employers who participate IB a retrotpective raUeg plaa. Pertena wiahieg to comment upon Ihe proposed action of Ihe Nevada Induttrial Committton may appear al the above tcheduled public hearing or may addreti their commcnU, dato, views or arguments, in written rorm. to UM Nevada Industrial Cemmisslott. SIS East Musser Street, Carton City, Nevada. Written submissions must be received by the Nevada Industrial CoauBissioB at leut flvc (SI day* prior to the above scheduled public bearlBg. A copy of Ihe proposed regulaUon will be on file at the office of Ihe Secretary of Stote, Capitol Complex, Carson Ctty. Neveda. fer Inapection by the public dBring busines* hour*. Addittonal ceple* ef the prepe*ed regnlatlen will be available al Ihe Nevada Indualrlal Cemsalsslen efllcei located at: Nevada Indaatrial Commlsslen. 118 Beat Nasser Stred. Careen City, Nevada, or Nevada iBdnatriai CemmlssieB. SMI E. Sekara Benlevard. Lea Vegaa. Nevada fer inspection and copying by tke puMk during kaalnee* kenr* and cople* will alee ke mailed to memker* ef Ike pnblle npoB reqaeil. A reaaeMUe fee May ke ckarged fer ceplee If deemed necettary. DATED: April SI. 188S. NEVADA INDUSTRIAi COMMISSION BY (II Jee E Nntbeum. JOB r NUSBAUM, Chairman 8UBSCBIBB0 and SWORN to before me Ikl* SUt day ef April. 18BS. (a) Delerea M. Neville DOLOBBS M. NEVILLE NOTABY PUBUC (SEAL) H Apr. 88. lUy IIS, M, lies NAY 87 INS APPLICATION FOB PERMISSION TO CHANGE THE POINT OF DIVERSION AND PLACE OF USE OF A PORTION OF THE PUBLIC WATERS OF THE STATE OF NEVADA HERETOFORE APPROPRIATED Appllcatton No. 4M10 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVfeN, that on the 2nd day of November, 1111, Robert C. Lewit and Vivian Lcwii of Moapa, Nevada, made application to the Stote Engineer of Nevada for permltilon to change Ihe point of diveriton and place of use ofO.SM c.fi., a portion of water heretofore ippropriited under Permit 27271, Certlflcate MM Water will be diverted from an underground source at a new point located wilhin (he NEV< SEV. Section S7, T14S., RME., MDBAM., or at a point from which the EV4 corner of tald Section n heart N. 43 IS' SS" E., a diatonce ef 70.11 feet. Water will be nied fer irrigation parpaae* from January 1*1 to December 31*1 f each year. The exIaUng point ef diveriton wu from an underground tource locetod wiUiln Ihe 8EW NEV4, Section S7. T14S.. BME.. MDBAM.. or al 1 point from wliich the NE corner of tald Section 27 heart N. ST 3r E, a dittanceoflMlfeet. Signed: Petor G Morrot PETER G. NORROS, P.E. Stote Engineer Date of flrtt publlcallon May 13.1882 Date of laat publication June 10.1888 B May U, M, 27. June 3. 10. 1M2 LEGAL NOTICE 73 Dodge to be lold to higbeit bidder when title it obtoined by mechanic's lien. Serial No. WP28M3G137441, Licenic No. OOOGVL-Ca. platet. Begiitered .owner Gee. J. Newlin, 1M41 (irove PI., Bloomington, Ca. Legal Owner: Bcnencial Finance Co.. 331 N. E. St., San Sernadino. Ca. Notice it hereby liivtn that I, Wilher Towing, ,^48 N. Parkion, Henderton, iMev. will tell above mentioned property on Wed June 23.1M2 at 10 a.m. at Hi N Parkion. Henderton, Nev gMlS. We retcrve Ihe right to bid. H May 8.13. M. 188S LEGAL NOTICE 7 Ponliac Coupe to be told to nighett bidder when title it obtoined by mechanic't lien. Serial No. 2C11B8US23970, Llcente No. TCL187 Nev. plalet. Regltlered owner Richard A. or Pamela K. Home, 17S Metropoliton. Henderson. Legal Owner: Barb Begley. Box 3M. Henderton, Nev. Notice it hereby given that 1, Walker Towing, 348 N. Parkton. Henderson. Nev. will sell above mentioned property on Mon May M. IMS at 10 am at S48 N. Parkaen. Henderson. Nev. We reserve the right to bid. H May 8,13,20, IMS LEGAL NOTICE 73 Buich, Hardtop to be sold to highest bidder when title is obtoined by mechanic's lien Serial No. 4LS7 H3HSS4S87. License No. TJIN8 Nev. plates. Begiitered owner Joanne Gray, 2101 Constoncc Avc, N. Us Vegss. Nev 88030. Ugal Owner: Same. Notice is hereby given that I. Walker rowing. SM N. Parksoa, Henlerson, Nev. will sell above menlioned properly on Men.. May 24.1882 It 10 a.m. at MSN. Parkion. Henderson, Nev. We reserve the right to bid. H May 8. 13. 20, 1N2 LEGAL NOTICE 1874 Mudi Hardtop to be told Ib bigheil bidder when title it obtoined by merhinic's iten. Sertol No. LA23S1M117. License No. TJEN4 Nev. pities. Registered owner Arthur Brown, 1148 Douglas Dr.. L.V. Nev. 88182. Ugal Owner: Same. Notice is hereby given that 1. Walker Towing, S48 N. Parkton, Henderson, Nev. will tcil ibove menlioned property on Wed., June 23,1H2 al 18 a.m. It SM N. Parkton. Henderton. 'iev. We reterve Ihe right to bid. :i May 8. 13, M, 1882 LEGAL NOTICE 1878 Mercury to be told to highett bidder when UUc it obtoined by mechanic's lien. Serial No. 8KMFS3S88S. Licenac No. iUXmv Callfernia platet. Regltlered owner Jerry D. Ardeo, IMl I8U1 St., Oceino, Ci. Ugal Owner: Bcnencial Finance Co. ef S*. Callfernia. 1312 Grant Ave., Arroyo Grande. Ca. Notice it hereby given that I. Walher Towing. M8 N. Parkton. Henderton, Nev. will tell ibeve meaUoned property on Man., June 21,1882 al 18 a.m. al SM N. Parkaen. Hendereea. Nev. 8MIS. We reeerve Ike rigkl to kid. 'I May 8.13. M. 1888 IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTBICT COUBT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, IN AND FOB THE COUNTY OF CLARK NO D488M GORDON L PIVODA. PUinUif vt. VEL M. PIVODA, Defendant SUMMONS THE STATE OF NEVADA SENDS GRBBTINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT: NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITH OUT YOUB BRING HEABD UNLESS YOU BESPOND WITHIN M DAYS BEAD THE INFOBNATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A ciril CempUlnl kai been flled by the plaintiff agalnat yea. 1 If yeu with to defend thi* iiwtuil. yeu mutt, within M diyi after Ihit Summont la terved on you, exclativc ef Ihe day of tervice. file witk Ikit Court I written pleading in retpontc to Ikii ComplalBl. S. Unlett you rctpoad. your defiull will be catered upoB ippllcalioa of the plaiatlff aad Ihit Court may eater a Judgmeal agaiatt yeu fer the relief demanded in Ihe Complaiat. which could retail IB the taking of moaey or property or other relief reqaetled la the Complaint. 3 If you with to teeh the advice of an attarncy in thit matter, yeu theuld do to promptly to that your rctpoBic may be flled on time. 4. You are required to terve your reiponic upon plelnUfr* iltorney, whote iddreii it JAMES A. WAGNEB, SS88 CIvto Center Drive. NerU Ui Vega*. Nevada 888M. Thli I* aa actiea to ditielve the bead* ef matrimony heretofore exIsUng bctweea Plaiatlff and Defea(s| Uretto Bowmaa LOBETTA BOWMAN, aerkef Court By (SI Lydia Redrtqnei LYDIA BODBIQUEZ. Deputy Cterk DATE: Jaa. M. 188S H • Apr. M. May 8.13, N. ISR. NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOB PERMISSION TO APPROPRIATE THE PUBLIC WATERS OF THE STATE OF NEVADA MAYOS, 188S Applicilion No 4S270 Notice it hereby given Ihil on the 28th diy of Jinuiry 1881 Derrick I Hodton of Ui Vegat, Stote of Nevada made applica• tion to Ihe Stote Engineer of Nevada for permlitlon to appropriate 0.030 oft tecond foot of the public waters of Ihe Stote of Nevada. Diversion ii to be made from an underground source al 1 point locited wilhin the NW.. SEW. Section 4, T206., R80E.. MDBAM.. or al 1 point Itom which the SV corner of said Section 4 heart 8. 33< M' M" W., a distonce of 2,188.M feel. Water will be used for domestic snd qusii • municipal purposes from Jsnuary Isl to December 31it of each year. Date ef nrsi puhllcalton May 13, 1N2. Date of last publication June 10.1882. Signed: Peter G. Morro* PE'TER G. NORROS. P.E. Stote Engineer B Nay 13. M. V, June 3. 10. 1M2 OFFICIAL NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Scaled bidi. tubjecl to the conditions conttined in Ihe Contract Documents, will be received at Ihe offlce of the Henderson Cily Clerk, 243 Water Slreet. Henderson. Nevada. 8N1S, up to the hour and date sUpulated below, at which time the bids will be publicly opened by Ihe City Clerk. The nime ind addres* of the Bidder wiUi Bid TlUe and Contract Number mu*t appear on the ouuide of the icaied envelope. CONVENTION CENTER LANDSCAPING Contract Number: 81-n32 Bid Opening: 2.00 P N., May M. 1882. Conference Room, City Hall, 243 Water SUeet. Henderton. Nevada 8M1S. Ucalion: Located al the corner of Water Slreet ind Atlantic Avenue in Ihe Cily of Henderton, Nevada. Description of Work: The work will contiil of tupplying all of the neceisary material and doing the necessary worh to landscape Ihe Henderson Convention Center. Bids must be lubmltted on Ihe forms furnished by the City and accompanied by a certified check, hid bond, or cashter's check in the amount of flve percent (S
PAGE 39

Page 38 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday, May 20,1982 Thuriday, May 20,198X iienoergon Home News and Bouidcr tuy Nc l-nge 30 Tax Changes Outfined By Cannon ItGAlNOTia U6AIN0TKE LEGAL MOTKE lEGAL NOTKt lEGAl NOTia lEOAl NOTICE lEGAl NOTICE LIGAl NOTKI USVEGAS---Nely S140 mlllioo in federal slot machine taxes have been retained in Nevada since 1972 and a tax cut worth more than $10 mUlion a year is nearing congressional approval, Sea. Howard Cannon said Wednesday. Cannon's remarks to gaming conference at the Las Vegas Hilton were delivered by former Gov. Grant Sawyer because Cannon had to return to Washington for the first round of the 1983 budget battle. The senator's address centered on changes in federal tax pfilicies that have occurred \n recent years. Cannon authored the 1971 change in the S2S0 slot tax which allowed 80% of. the proceeds to remain, in the state for educational use. He also sponsored 1978 legislation that raised the state's amount, in two stages, to 100. Nevada received $21 million in slot taxes in the fiscal year that ended June 30. for a total of S137 miUion since 1972. The money is used for support of public education, for University of J^evada building prolecta and for construction of sports pavilions on the Las Vegas and Reno camputes of the ^ University. .On the. horizon la v^ual elimination of two federal laxes on sports betting that cost Nevada businesses, more than $10 million last vear. Cannon stated that a House-Senate Conference Committee was scheduled. today to iake up his bill which reduces a 2% federal excise tax on wagers to one-quarter of one per cent and a $500 occupational tax on employees of soorts betting establish* menta to $50. The Senate approved Cannon's bill last year and final acceptance by both houaes is expected, when Ahp conference. committee completes its review. "It has taken a lot of persuasion and just plain 'pesterins'.to get the Senate to tocus on these tax inequities and do something about them." Cannon said. "I think I have helped open the door for consideration of these issues and it is a door I intend to push open wider and wider in the future." Down On Farm Solution For Crime "Put'em down on the farm." That was the response given by 20 year veteran law enforcement officer Lt. Dale D. Davis to the question posed by area business representatives as to what can be done to rid the community, of the hordes of hookers and pimps who accost tourists and locals alike nightly on the Strip. "There is no magical way and certainly no mysterious jsolutions" the candidate for sheriff explained," just Jiard work, determination, patience, and the proper use of police personnel," Davis said. The farm Davis referred to is the old Las Vegas Rehab farm located on Vegas Valley Drive east of Nellis Boulevard. Built by the State of Nevada as a maximum detention facility, it was once used by the Las Vegas Police Department to house vagrants,, drunks and other misdemenants. Currently Metro has a shooting range on the premises and there are laundry facilities for the county jaiL Although the City of Las Ve^as owns the propjerty, according to Davis.the sheriff has the right to use the farm.for any activipr that it was used for in 1973, before the meraer which produced Metro. "The fact is that McCarthy at one time used the. facility to books hookers," Davis said, "but backed away from it when a few lawyers representing hookers and pimps complained to the sheriff," Davis charged. "The situation is ideal and the location of. the farm is perfect," Davis explained," all you have to do is p\it a small task force on the streets, keep rotating them, and theyjire a sure bet to be accosted by the hookers. Then you pile them into the big Metro bus together with any pimps you can find and take them out to the farm for booking," Davis continued. The amount of time consumed in driving to the iarm and in the booking process will kill the evening for the hookers u %nd means a loss of income to the pimps." According to the. veteran Metro Officer," the only people you .will be inconveniencine are the hookers, pimps, and some criminal lawyers, and. if you have to make more than one trip a night, that's okay, too," Davis added. Davis, who^has, 14 years of service wUh Las Vegas Police Department and Metro said that as time passed, lie would change booking places to keep the hookers, pimps, and their lawyers guessing." I'd dump them off anywhere, within the boundaries of the county for booking," Davis said, and that could mean between Jean and Stateline, between Indian Springs and nowhere, and other out qif j the way loca^oiis. All we need is 1 mobile bookbg office, take them m, book them and let them find their way back.to town." Davis admitted that it would take cooperation of the District Attorney's office, the Justices .of the Peace, alona with the support or Ihe community." McCarthy can't get it on bficau&e instead, of seeking cooperation he has blamed every agency in the town for his own ineptness and lack of ability of his high, echelon aides in dealing with police problems as well evidenced by the poor record of shoddy law enforcement compiled by the current Metro administrative team," Davis concluded. .*'^ f^^ iv> \> REPELING AT KEYHOLE CANYON -These young people were seen learning to repel down a mountainside at Keyhold Canyon recently. The canyon is located not far from Henderson and is a nice drive through the countryside. You should get directions before going, however, as there are no signs. The scenery is rugged and beautiful. Jim Dyer Baseball Tryouts Begin Tomorrow Tryouts for the Jim Dyer ising career in baseball American Baseball Team came to an end as his life will begin at 5 p.m. Friday on was ended by cancer. Western High School's WarThe Jim Dyer Team was rtor Tield basebati formed that summerand has^ diamond. An additional trybeen in operation ever out day is scheduled for Saturday at 5 p.m. and practice for both A and B teams begins Monday at Warrior Field. The Jim Dyer Americans Baseball Team will begin its fifth season of play in June of this summer. The players on the team are college age (19-23). The team was named in memory of Jim Dyer, an outstanding student and allaround athlete who graduated from Las Vegas High School in 1974. After attending college and playing baseball in Arizona for a year, Jim signed a professional baseball contract with the New York Mets. In April of 1978 his promsince. Over this timl", numerous semi-pro and amateur baseball teams from out of state have played the Jim Dyer Club in Las Vegas. Teams who have played here include: Smithfield Blue Sox, Smithfield, Utah; Riverside West, Riverside. Calif.; Whittier Baseball Club, Whittier, Calif.; Azuza Baseball Club, Azuza, Calif.; Jonco Giants, American Forks, Utah; S.L.O. Blues, San Luis Obispo, Calif.; San Bernardino Indians, San Bernardino, Calif.; Bakersfield Semi-Pros, Bakersfield. Calif.; Clovis Mavericks. Fresno. Calif.; LaHabra Zephyrs, San Diego, Calif.; Santa Maria Saints, Santa Maria, Calif.; Mexico City Reds, Mexico City, Mexico; J.C. Collegian, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Mesa Pistons, Mesa, Ariz.; Village Pizza, Phoenix, Ariz, and" others. Most of the players are local high school graduates who are currently attending and playing baseball at some college or university. The team gives these young players an opportunity to continue improving their baseball skills throughout the summer months when school is not in progress. Competition is extremely keen at the college level and only highly dedicated players who are willing to virtually play year around can successfully compete in college. This past summer, the players represented 14 different junior colleges, colleges or universities. Ken Elsee, the AUAmerican pitcher from UNLV and drafted into the Houston Astros organization, was a walk on and pitched for the Jim Dyer Club in the summer of 1978. Ove rthep a St threere^arsr 194 players have had tryouts for the team, 119 have played in one or more games over this period of time. In the summer of 1978 the .team was invited to participate in the National Baseball Congress Tournament held in Wichita, Kan sas each summer for the 32 outstanding amateur baseball teams in the nation. This tournament began in 1936 and many major leaguers of today have played in this tournament. Satchel Paige, the great black pitcher, pitched a nohitter in the 1936 tournament The Jim Dyer Club of 1978 came in 11th out of the 32 teams with wins over good baseball teams from Georgia and Tennessee. Tfiink it would make any difference if W6 could \/C)te?' -r4Why Support A Blood Drive? If you or a loved one entered the hospital and needed blood, would it be readily available? This question is the vital concern of United Blood Services, our community blood center which is responsible for supplying the blood needs of Boulder City and the Las Vegas area. Your blood center is an affiliate of Blood Services, a system of not-for-profit blood centers located in 12 states. Combined, these centers serve the blood needs of patients in over 1200 hospitals. In order to make blood available to patients who need it. Blood Services must recruit blood donors draw blood, perform tests and typing procedures and distribute the blood to area hospitals as needed. To fully meet the requests of physicians in our local hospitals and surrounding area, blood of every type must be available at all times. This blood must come from volunteer donors who are willing to give of themselves to meet day-to-day blood needs. There's no substitute for blood; the human body is still the only source. If you believe that your immediate need for blood is remote, consider that each day more than 24,000 units of blood are transfused in the I'nited States over 12 million units per year. And that number is increasing rapidly. Yet it is estimated that less than 3 percent of the population donates blood to meet these needs. Donating blood is a safe, simple and satisfying experience. Most"^ healthy persons between the ages of 17 and 66 are generally accepted as blood donors. And every volunteer donor helps meet a vital need in this community. United Blood Services of Southern Nevada will hold a blood drive here at Boulder City Elks Lodge on May 20. 1982. For your information Facts to Remember Q. How many people donate blood? A. 3 out of 100. Q. How often do people need blood? A. 90 out of 100 people will need blood in their life times. Q. How much blood is needed for heart surgery? A.An adult can use as much as 20 pints and a child about seven. Q. How much time does it take to give a pint of blood? : '' A. Approximately 5-8 minutes. Q. Why does it take approximately 30 minutes of work? A. Before you can give, we give you a miniphysical to make sure you can give, and after you're done you will have some refreshments Q. What if I have never donated before? A. Fantastic! Be a first time donor. Most first time donors feel fine after donating. Q. How often can a person donate a year? A. Every 8 weeks. Q. How quickly will my blood be used? A. We will use it in 2 to 3 days. AQ What are the chances of my blood saving someone's life? A. Very good. Consider i that patients lives are very often dependent upon surgeries, and that surgeries can happen only when blood is available. Q. Are you going to charge a patient for the blood I donate? A. No. We are a nonprofit community blood center and don't charge for the blood itself The patient will be charged our exact cost of drawing, testing, processing, storing and shipping the blood. Q. How much blood do I have, do I give,and how long does it take to replace? A. You have about 11 or 12 pints, we take one. and your body replaces the entire volume in 24 hours. Lough £)ut "1 went to see a spiritualist last night." "Was he good?" "No, just medium." • • • "What is the outstanding contribution that chemistry has given to the world?" Blondes! Picture Mounl Everest capped by three Empire State Buildings. That's about 33,400 feet-and that's how Tar underground a natural gas well now being drilled at the Anadarko Basin in Oklahoma, is expected to extend. If it does, the well will set a new Free World drilling depth record. Drilling to such depth, is aided by TRW Inc. fluid end parts, centrifugal pumps, and butterfly valves. Those products are used in the two mud pumps in the well's circulating system. The mud pump is to a drilling operation what the heart is to the human body: it circulates fluid— the chemical-based fluid commonly called drilling mud — down the hole to lubricate and cool the drill bit, flush material from the hole, help form and maintain the hole, and prevent possible blowouts. Wells such as the one at the Anadarko JBaCin are known in the drilling indus try as "ultra dcpp, i P America is now drilling what may be the deepest well in history —a well as deep as the height of Mount Everest, topped by three Empire State Buildinas. deeper than 20,000 feet. Of the almost 2 million wells that have'been drilled since the industry was born, approximately 500 qualify as ultra-deep, However, more ultra-deep wells will likely be drilled in the future. The reason? Most of the easily recoverable oil and gas deposits have already been tapped. Quips one wildcatter: "With the current revved-up drive to find new sources of energy, there's almost no limit to the depths that the in duttry will go." Certainly the Anadarko Basin well is proof of thai ^1 rvsuc NoncB OBOINANCI NO. Ml AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY or HINDIBMN, NIVADA. • 'AN OIDINANCI AMINOINQ BBNDBHON MVNiaPAL CODB CHAPTBM 4.M AND 4.N A8 ISTAIUMBD •Y ODDINANCB NO. IM BY SBTTINC rOKtU CHANGB8 IN TBMrOBABY BVSINBSS LICRNSB, BVaiNBM LICBNBB SUPBBVIMB 0VTIE8, BEDBFINING -BOOKBECPBR' PBU AND ADDING "BBOBBB" TO THE PBB SCHBDULB; AND OTHBB MATTEU BBLATINGTHBUrrO." The abwrt BlU Ne. 411 sad reregeleg Ordiuace wee Hret IM'speecd ead read by UU U the City CeeMll ef Iks City ef Heii4enea,Nevate.a Afril M. INI, wkicb was § Begelar MesttM er Ike CeMlI aB4 referred U Ike MtowiM Cea• Itter ••COUNaL Al A WBOLT' fer receauMBdetlea. PVBLIC NOTICE !• kefeby llviB Ikat tke tyHrlllea ctes tl Ike ebeve • el U eeJ Ordtuacc are • vallaUe fSr • • srectle* by sU iBtereKed fulie* al tke Offlce tt Ike City ClMTk, 141 Water Slreet, Headersee, Nevadaj emd that saM Ordlnaacc Ne. Ml was fnpoted fer adoption by CeaDcllmas Price aed aeceaded by CouBcUBaan AnderteD ee Ike 17th day ef May INt, and •defied by Ike feilewlsi reU cell vele: VntlBI AYE: NAYOB LEBOY ZIBE; COUNCIL MBMBBB8 LOBNA BE8TEB80N, BENT ANDEB80N, GARY PBICE AND CLOYD LOVITT. VotlBg NAY: NONE. Ahseal: NONE. LEROY ZIKE, MAYOR ATTEST: PPBOTHY A. VONDEN•BINK, CMC CITY CLEBK H Nay M, INS PUBUC NOTICE OBOINANCE NO. MS AN OBDINANCB OF THE CITY OF BENDEB80N, NEVADA. "AN OBDINANCE CONCERNING HENDERSON, NEVADA, LOCAL IMPROVEMENT DI8TBICT NO.SM; (QBEEN VALLEY); CONFIBMING THE PBOCEEDINGS TAKEN IN PBOVIDING FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A SEWER PROJECT AND A WATER PROJECT IN HENDERSON, NEVADA IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. •U; PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE COST AND EXPENSES OF THE IMPBOVEMENTS; ASSESSING THE COST OF THE IMPB0VEMENT8 AGAINST THE ASSESSABLE LOTS AND TRACTS OF LAND BENEFITED BY THE IMPBOVEMENTS; DESCRIBING THE NANNEB FOR THE COLLECTION AND PAYMENT OF THE ASSESSMENTS; PBOVIDING PENALTY FOR DELINQUENT PAYMENTS; RATIFYING, APPROVING AND CONHRMING ACTION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN IN CONNECTION WITH THE DI8TBICT; PBBSCBIBING DETAILS IN CONNECTION THEBBWITH AND OTHBB MATTEBS BBLATING THEBETO; AND PBOVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE FOB THE OBDINANCE" The abeve BUI Ne. ttl and feregelBg Ordlaaece was flrst proposed and reed by title U tke City CeuBcil of the City el Henderson, Nevada, on May S, IHZ, whick was a Begnlar Meeting ef tke Council and referred U the (eilewing Cemmlttec: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLE" for recemmendaUon. PUBLIC NOTICE Is kereby given that Ihe typewritten copies of the above menlioncd Ordinance are available fer Inspection by all inleretled parlies al the Office ef the City Clerk. MS Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that aald Ordinance No. MS was proposed fbr ado p tion by Council• aa Levitt and seconded by CouBcllDun Price on the 17th day of May INt. and adopted by the rallowing roll call veto: Voting AYE: MA YOB LEBOY ZIKE; COUNCILMEMBBBS LOBNA KE8TER80N, BENT ANDEBSON, GABY PBICE AND CLOYD LOVITT. VoUng NAY: NONE. Absent: NONE. LEBOY ZIKE, MA YOB ATTEST: DOBOTHY A. VONDBNBBINK,CMC CITYCLEBB H • May M, lt PUBUC NOTICE OBMNANCB NO. IM AN OBDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDBBSON. NBVADA. "AN OBDINANCB OF THE CITY OF HENDBBSON, NEVADA. AMENDING OBDINANCB m TO COBRBCT THE INCBBA8B8 IN MONTHLY WATBB SERVICE CHABGES AND FEES, B8PECIALLY BBLATING TO SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENCES METBB SIZES OF LESS THAN ONE (1) INCH AND PBOVIDING OTHBB MATTEBS BBLATING THEBETO WITH BESPECT TO HENDBBSON MUNICIPAL CODE SECTION IS.M.IN AS ORIGINALLY ESTABLISHED BY OBOINANCE 7M, BECTION S. The abeve BUI Ne. 41* and foregoing Ordinance wes flnt proposed and reed by tlUe to the City Council *f the City of Rendersen. Nevada, en May I, INS, which wes a Begnlar Meeting ef Ike Ceaacll and referred le tke iWlewIng CesunlHee: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLB" fbr recoBsaendatlon. PUBUC NOTICICB li kereby given Ikat Ike typewritten copies ef tke abeve aentlened Ordinance arc avaiUble fbr Inspection by all interested fv tiee at the Offlce of Uie City Clerk, MS Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. >M wu prepoeed for sdopllon by Councilnun Anderson and seconded by CeuncilBsan Levitt en the 17th day of May, INS, and adopted by Uie rollowing roll call vole: Voting AYE: MA YOB LEBOY ZIKE; COUNCILMEMBBBS LORNA KE8TER80N. KENT, ANDEBSON. GABY PBICE AND CLOYD LOVITT. Voting NAY: NONE. Absent: NONE. LEBOY ZIKE, MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC CITY CLERK H May S8,1I8S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTIcr IS HEBEBY GIVEN that Ihe City Council ef the City of HcndorsoB proposed by reading in UUe Uie fbllowlng Ordinance at ils May 17lh, l8t Meeting. enliUed: BILL NO. 4tS "AN ORDINANCE DESIGNATED AS THE "JULY IMS BOND ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE BY THE CITY OF HENDERSON. IN CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. OF ITS NEGOTIABLE. COUPON, GENERAL OBLIGATION (LIMITED TAX) MUNICIPAL UTILITY (SANITARY SEWEB) BONDS. SEBIES JULY IISS (ADDITIONALLY SECURED BY PLEDGED REVENUES), IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF SZ.SM.ON; PROVIDING THAT THE BONDS MAY BE EVIDENCED BY A SINGLE. REGISTERED BOND (WITHOUT COUPONS) IN THE SAME PRINCIPAL AMOUNT: PROVIDING FOR THE LEVY AND COLLECTION OF AN ANNUAL AD VALOREM TAX FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE BONDS; PBOVIDING DTHER DETAILS CONCEBNING THE BONDS AND SUCH FACILITIES; ADDITIONALLY SECURITY THEIR PAYMENT BY A PLEDGE OF REVENITES DERIVED FROM THE OPERA TION OF THE CITY'S JOINT 8ANITABY SEWEB AND WATER UTILITY SYSTEM: RATIFYING ACTION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN RY THE CITY AND ITS OFFICERS; AND BY DECLABING THAT THIS ORDINANCE PERTAINS TO THE SALE, ISSUANCE AND PAYMENT OF THE BONDS, PROVIDING FOR ITS ADOPTION AS IF AN EMERGENCY EXISTS. which has been refered to a Committee of the Council as s Whole fer Ihe study and recommendation and a copy of said Ordinance has been nicd wiUi the CltyOerk for general public ecruUny. The Commitlee Meeting wiU be held June 7, \Mt at tM p.m., immediately preceding the Regular Meeting at 7:M p.m. In Ihe Council Chamber al City Hall. MS Water Street. The Council will consider this Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting of the City Council. June 7, l(8t; and in any case will adept or reject this Ordinance witkln Sgdaya. DATED this 17th day of May IMt. and published May M, IMt, In the Henderson Home News. (s) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENHMayMlNS • "Y^JISS ^at^ Cmy0ii9efieett?^ Just as the world-wide j;:redit war is heating up, the U.S. seems to b disarming. Oj^r most potent weapon — the Export-Import Bank — no longer has sufficient funds to permit American mapuftcturers to aggressively go i fter many export opportunities. Nor does it have competitive interest rates to match those offered by the foreign competition. Some legislators may even want to do away with the Eximbank — one of the only government agencies that has never cost taxpayers anything. In fact, it has returned more than one billion dollars in dividends over the years to the U.S. Treasury. American companies and labor are working to convince Washington legislators that strengthening Exim bank's lending authority would be good for our nation's economy. We'd gain jobs and tax revenues. To make your voice heard, write your Congressmen at the US Senate, Washington D.C. 20510, and the House of Representatives, Washing ton, D.C. 20515. H PUBLIC NOTICE NOnCB U HEREBY flIVBN thai Ihe City Council ef Ike City ef Mendersen prepesod by reading In UUe tke fellewing Ordinance at Ils Mey ITtk, INS Mpbting, enUlled: BILL NO. 4tt "AN OBDINANCE BEPEALING HENDBBSON MUNICIPAL CODB CHAPTEB 1S,48 AS ESTABLISHED BY OBDINANCE S77; AMENDING TITLE II BY ADDING THEBETO A NEW CHAPTEB CODIFIED AND DESIGNATED CHAPTEB 1S.41 BBLATING TO SIGNS: SETTING FOBTH PURPOSES, DEFINITIONS, SIGN BEQUIBENENT8 AND PEBMIT8; DELINEATING AND DESIGNATING TYPE OF SIGNS FOB PEBMITS: ADMINI8TBATION AND ENFOBCEMENT; ESTABU8HING A PENALTY FOB VIOLATION OF THE OBDINANCE: AND OTHBB MATTEBS BELATING THEBETO." wkick kas been referred to a Committee of the Council as a Whole for study and recomnendaUen and a copy of said Ordinance has been Hied with the City Clerk fbr general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting wiU be held June 7, latt al *.H pm.. ImMdialely preceding UM Begnlar Meeting at 7:N p.m. in Ihe Council Chamber al City Hall, 141 Water Street. Tke Council wiU consider this Ordinance for adoption at the Begular Meetlag ef Ihe City CeuBcU, June 7, lS8t; and in any case will adept or reject this Ordinance wilhin St day*. DATED Uils 17th day of May, INS. and published May tO, list. In Uie Henderaen Home New*. (s) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CITY CLERK (DISTRICT COURT SEAL) H May M, INS PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN tkal Ihe City Council of the City of Henderton proposed by reading in titie the following Ordinance at its May 17tb, IMS Meeting, cnlllled: BILL NO. 411 "AN OBDINANCE EXTENDING THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDBBSON BY ANNEXING THEBETO THAT POBTIONOF THE SOUTH HALF (SH) OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NWV4) OF SECTION 13, TOWN 2S SOUTH. RANGE gt EAST, M.D.M.. COUNTY OF CLARK, STATE OF NEVADA. CONTAINING AN AREA OF APPROXIMATELY 1< ACRES." which has been referred to a Committee of the Council as a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy ef said Ordinance has been filed with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee NeeUng will be held June 7, list at tM p.m., immedatejy preceding Ihe Regular Meeting at 7:00 p.m. in Ihe Council Chamber at City Hall, S43 Water Street. The Council will consider Ibis Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting of the City Council. June 7. IMS: and In any cue will adopt or reject this Ordinance within 30 days. DATED this 17th day of May IMS. and published May 20. INS, in Uic Henderson Home News. (s) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK. CMC, L____ CITY CLERK (DISTRICT COURT SEAL) H May SO. IMS PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the Oty of Henderson proposed by reading in titie Uie fellewing Ordinance al its May 17th, l8t Meeting. entUled: BILL NO. 4S3 "AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. ON OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVADA, CODIFIED AS HENDBBSON MUNICIPAL CODE S.SI ESTABLISHING THE CHARGES TO BE ASSESSED FOB THE OPEBATION AND MAINTENANCE OF AMBULANCE SERVICES IN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA BY INCBEA8ING CHABGES FOR SERVICES, WITHIN AND OUTSIDE CITY LIMITS AND MEDICAL SUPPLIES AND PROVIDING OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO." which has been referred to a Committee of the Council as a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of said Ordinance has been Hied with Ihe City Ocrk for general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting wiU be held June 7, 1182 at l:M p.m., immediately preceding the Regular Meeting at 7:M p.m. In Ihe Council Chamber at City Hall, SIS Water Street. The Council will consider this Ordinance for adoption al the Regular Meeting of the City Council. June 7, INS; and in any case will adopt or reject Uils Ordinance within SO days, DATED this 17th day of May. INS. and published May M. INS. in Ihe Henderson Home News. (SI Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBBINK, CMC CITYCLEBB .(SEAL) H May M, 1B8S I • Tips for returning from an outdoor trip alive: ^Always carry survival gear. Listen to radio weather reports. Inform someone of your destination and when you expect to return. Visually check the sky frequently for storm clouds. Establish campsites on high ground. PUBUC NOTICE NOTICE 18 HEBEBY OIVBN Ikat tke City CeuBcU ef Ihe aiy f Henderton prepesed by rendIng In title the fallowing Ordinance al its May 17. INS Meeting, enUUed: BILL NO. 4M "AN OBDINANCB AMENDING HENDBBSON MUNICIPAL CODE IS SETTING FOBTH A NEW SECTION TO BE CODIFIED AND DESIGNATED ISM DEAUNG WITH FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION DETAILING DEFINITIONS, PBOCEDUBES AND OTHBB MATTEBS RELATING THEBETO which has been referred to a Committee of the Council a* a Whole fer study and recemmcndaUoD and a copy of said Ordinance has been nied with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting will be held June 7, IMS at 8:M p.m.. Immediately preceding the Begular Meeting at 7:N p.m. in the Council Chamber at City Hall. 843 Water Street. The Council will consider Ibis Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting ef the City Council. June 7. IMS; and in any case will adept or reject this Ordinance within M days. DATED this I7th day of Nay, IMS. and published May Z%. lies, in the Henderson Home News. (s) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOBOTHY A. VONDENBBINK. CMC, CITY CLERK (SEAL) H May M, IMS NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR PERMISSION TO APPROPRIATE THE PUBLIC / WATERS OF THE STATE OF NEVADA May 11, IMS Application No. 43773 Notice is hereby given thai on the Slst day of Nay 1881, Samuel L. Welpman of Las Vegas Stale of Nevada made application to the State Engineer of Nevada for penniiiion to appropriate O.S of a second foot of the public waters of the SUlc of Nevada. Diversion Is to be made feom an underground source al a point located wilhin Uic NW^ SEW, SecUon 8, TS3S., R81E., MDBAM. or at a point from which the SSk comer of said Section • bears S. 38* OS' SO" W., a distance of l.gSS.OO feet. Water will be used for quasi muhiclpal and domestic piirposes from January 1st to December 3Ist of each year. Dale of nrst Publication May SO, 188S. Dale of last publication June 17.1B8S. Signed: Peter G. Morro* PETEB G. NORROS. P.E. State Engineer B • May SO, 27. June 3. 10. 17, IIM • FILED MAY 7 3:97 PN 'M ,; LORETTA BOWMAN BY DOROTHEA RA8QUI CASE NO. P14M8 IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLARK NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HALVOR BENNlON. Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Ihe undersigned has been duly appointed and qualined by the Eighth Judicial District Court on the llth day of April. IMS as Executor of the Eilate of HALVOR RENNION, deceased. All creditors having claims against said Estate are required to file the same with the proper vouchers attached with the Clerli of the Court within sixty (M) days after the f^rst publication of this Notice. DATED this llth day of April. II8S. (SI Douglas Pcndielon Bennion DOUGLAS PENDLETON BENNION Submitted by (8) Steven J. Parsons. STEVEN J. PAB80NS. ESQ. Attorney for Executor P.O. Box IM Boulder City. Nevada 888N B • May M, S7, June 3, 188S CITY OF BOULDEB aTY A Municipal Corporation NO Arlsena Street Boulder City. Nevada 880W NOTICE INVITING BIDS The City of Boulder Cily, Nevada will receive hide for the following: ELECTBICAL CABLE Speclflcatlons and bid forms may he obuined al Ihe Finance DcparlmcBl. City Hall. tM ArUena Street, Boulder Cily, Nevada 880N. Sealed bids for such will be received al the ofnce of Ihe Finance Director unlil SM P.M. P.D T. on June 1. IMS when they will he opened and read aloud In Ihe City Council Chamber*. Boulder Cily retains the right to reject any and all bids. to waive any Informality In bidding, and to accept any bid daemtd esost advantageoui le the City. (SI Bebert E. Beyer ROBEBT E. BOYEB Finance Director B May SO, 1S8S I, MkhaclMosser. asoTMay M. do hereby give neUcc that I am no longer responsible fer debit other then my own. (s) MIckaci James Matter MICHAEL JAMES MOWEB H • May M, S7. June S. IMS FILED APR. M 10:11 AM M LORETTA BOWMAN, CLEBK BY MOBOAN LEA CLABKB CASE NO. D4SS87 VII P IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTBICT COUBT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOB THE COUNTY OF CLABK PETITION TO TEBMINATE PABENTAL BIGHTS IN THE MATTEB OF THE PARENTAL RIGHTS A8 'TO KIMBEBLY ANNE BICHAR080N and KABLA MABIE RICHARDSON, Miners. Tke Petilion ef LUCILLE ROSE BBUNO respeclfnliy shows. I. Thai Uicrc retidet within the County of Clarh, Stale ef NeVeda. two miner children, lo-wil: KIMBEBLY ANNE RICHARDSON, hern October II. iro. and KARLA MARIE RICHARDSON, born July 17, 1174. who should be declared free from the custody and control of their father, RODNEY DEAN RICHARDSON. II. That RODNEY DEAN RICHARDSON, the father of said children. Is an unHt parent la that he has willfully felled and refuted to provide them with prefer care, gnidancc and support. in. Thai the tald minor children, al the lime ef Ihe niing ef Ihit Petilion. reilde with their mother al S88S Jecelyn Drive, Las Vegas, Nevada MISS. IV. That the natural mother ef the said miner children has remarried to LAWRENCE FRANCIS BBUNO, JR. and lives at SMS Jocelyn Drive, Las Vegas, Nevada, and was awarded Ihe custody of said minor children in a decree of divorce entored in Uie Eighth Judicial District Couri of (he Stole of Nevada, in and for the County ofClark, June so, 1I7S, and that Ihe father of tald children hit hid no contoci or vititolion with them and bai paid nothing toward their auppori and maintonanee tince that lime. WHEREFORE, Petilioner prayt that Ihe Couri order a lermioallon of Ihe parental rights of RODNEY DEAN RICHARDSON at to the tald minor rhildren, and for fbriher relief that may be proper In the premitet. (II John F. MarchUno, JOHN F MARCHIANO, ESQ. Attorney for Petilioner M3 Wator Street Henderton, NV 8N1S STATE OF NEVADA COUNTY OF CLARK SS: LUCILLE ROSE BRUNO, being first duly sworn, deposes and says: Thai she Is the Petitioner in the above entitled maltor; that she bis read the foregoing Petition to Terminato Parental RighU and knows the eontonU thereof: and that the tame li true of her own knowledge, except at to thote matteri therein alleged on information and belief, and at to those matter* the believet it to be true. (tl Lucille Rote Bruno LUCILLE BOSE BBUNO SUBSCRIBED AND SWOBN to before me Ihit Sllh day of April, IMS. Monica M. Simmoni MONICA M. SIMMONS NOTABY PUBUC H-Mayl3,M,S7,June3,188S FILED MAY 7 11:M AM tt LORETTA BOWMAN, CLEBK BY MABGO CBOOKS CASE NO. D43S37 VII P IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLARK NOTICE IN THE NATTER OF THE PARENTAL RIGHTS AS TO KIMBEBLY ANNE RICHARDSON and KARLA MARIE RICHARDSON, Minort. TO: RODNEY DEAN RICHARDSON, the father of Ihe above named minor children, and to all pertoni related to Ihe above named minort: YOU ARE HERERY NOTIFIED Uial there hat been nied In the above enlllled Court a Petition praying fer the termination of parenul rights over Ihe above named minor children, and that the Petition hat been tct for hearing befbrc Ihit Court al Ihe Courireom thereof al Ut Vega*, Nevada, en the Mb day of July, 18B. at the hour of 8:M o'clock A.M.. at which time and place you are required to be pretcnl if you dctirc to oppoec the Petition. DATED Ihit 7th day of May. list (a) Leretto Rewman LORETTA ROWMAN. CLERK Bydl Marge Creek* MARCO CBOOKS DISTBICT COURT SEAL H-MaylS.M,n,JnneS.lB8S OFFiaAL NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids, ankject to Ike ceBdltlen* centelned In tke Centred Decumento. will ke received at Ike office ef Ike Henderson City Clerk, 843 Water Slreet. Henderson, Neveda. 8MIS up to Uw kenr and date stipnlaled below, at which time the bid* will be publicly opened by the City Ocrk. Tke name and addreas ef Ike Ridder witk RM TlUe and Contract Numker meat appear en Ike eutoide ef tke aeeled envelope. CONTRACT NAME: IMPBOVEMENT OF SUNSET BOAD BOULDEB HIGHWAY TO HARBN DRIVE Cenlract Niuiber; 81-8S|^1 Bid Opening: 8:N P.M.. June S, Ion, ConferoMe Boom, City Hall, 843 Wator Slreet. Henderson, Nevada 8M18. Lecelton: Tke work will be perfoTMod In Sections 1 and 2, Township SS South. Baoge U East, M.D M.. in the City of Henderson, Clerh County, Nevada. Description ef Work: The work will consist of the Improvement of Sunset Road and realignment ef Burnt Road, iooluding removal of eiiiling roadway and coniiructtoo of pavement, curb and gutter, median, storm drslnage facilities, slreet lights, traffic signals, sad related Items as required by the Plans and Speciflcallons. Bids must be submitted on the form fernished by (he City and accompanied by i ccrtined check, bid bond, or ciihleri check in the amount of nve percent(t%lof the total amount of Ihe bid, made payable to the City of Hcndersen. The *uccei*flil bidder will be required to fttmleb al bit own expentc a Matorlalt k Labor Bond in Ihe amount of not loot than one-hundred percent <180%) of Uie contracted price. A Fiithhl Performance Bond In the amount of not leit than one-hundred percent (100% i of Ihe contract price and i Guaranty Bond in the amount of not less than ooe-buodred percent (100^1 of thr contract price. Guaranty ihall be for one (II year from the date of completion. Bid formt and Contract Decumenti may be obtoined al the City Hall Annex, 22S Uad Slreet, Henderton, Nevada. Each tcl of plant and speciHcalions may be purchased for the price of TWENTY DOLLARS (ISO.OO), with NO REFIISD. If mailed, an additional 15 00 set will be charged for poiUge and handling. Copies of the Plans and Specifications are available for Inspection at Ihe Public Works Department. Current U.S. Labor Department Wage Schedule* shall be observed. The Cily reserves Uie right to reject any or all bidi, or waive any informalities aad-or irregularities in Ihe Bidding. The lowest retponilve ind retponsible bidder will be Judged on the bitit of price, performince on previous conlrarts, bidder's qualinealions, and the bctt interetl of Ihe public each of tuch factors being cootidered. A pre-bid conference will be held in the Conference Room in the Cily Hall Annex, 22S Uad atreet. Henderton, Nevada at: 11:00 A.M.. May 2S. 1982. (tl Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDEN BRINK. CMC City Clerk H May 13. M. 27, June 3.1N2 NOTICE OF HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Nevada Induttrial Committlon will bold a public hearing at 1:30 P.M. on May M. 1882. in the Training Boom of the Nevada Induttrial Commiislon. SIS East Musser Street, Csrton City, Nevada. The purpose of the bearing will be to receive cemmentt from all interetted perteni regarding Ihe reviiiea of Begulatlon U. If no peraon. who will be directly affected by the propoied agency action, appear* to requet time to make an oral prctentotioB. the Nevada Induttrial Committlon may proceed immediately to act upon any written tubmltdont. The public hearing wiU be held to eentider a revitlon of Nevada Induttrial CommitiloB Begulatton U concerning ReIrotpeclive Reting Plan and Cath Flow OpttAt. The purpete of the retroofffHire rating plan is to promote accident prevention and ssfciy conKiousness among employers, and to estoblish equity between the premiums charged individual emplojrers who qualify for raUng. A retrospecUve rating is a plan or method which permits adtustmcnt of the nnal premium fer a risk on the batit of its own lees expcriCBce subject to maximum aud aUBlmum llmlto. Four optloBal plaBS are avallahiA caah flow option is an optlOBal method of premium payment which aaay be elected by qualified employers who participate IB a retrotpective raUeg plaa. Pertena wiahieg to comment upon Ihe proposed action of Ihe Nevada Induttrial Committton may appear al the above tcheduled public hearing or may addreti their commcnU, dato, views or arguments, in written rorm. to UM Nevada Industrial Cemmisslott. SIS East Musser Street, Carton City, Nevada. Written submissions must be received by the Nevada Industrial CoauBissioB at leut flvc (SI day* prior to the above scheduled public bearlBg. A copy of Ihe proposed regulaUon will be on file at the office of Ihe Secretary of Stote, Capitol Complex, Carson Ctty. Neveda. fer Inapection by the public dBring busines* hour*. Addittonal ceple* ef the prepe*ed regnlatlen will be available al Ihe Nevada Indualrlal Cemsalsslen efllcei located at: Nevada Indaatrial Commlsslen. 118 Beat Nasser Stred. Careen City, Nevada, or Nevada iBdnatriai CemmlssieB. SMI E. Sekara Benlevard. Lea Vegaa. Nevada fer inspection and copying by tke puMk during kaalnee* kenr* and cople* will alee ke mailed to memker* ef Ike pnblle npoB reqaeil. A reaaeMUe fee May ke ckarged fer ceplee If deemed necettary. DATED: April SI. 188S. NEVADA INDUSTRIAi COMMISSION BY (II Jee E Nntbeum. JOB r NUSBAUM, Chairman 8UBSCBIBB0 and SWORN to before me Ikl* SUt day ef April. 18BS. (a) Delerea M. Neville DOLOBBS M. NEVILLE NOTABY PUBUC (SEAL) H Apr. 88. lUy IIS, M, lies NAY 87 INS APPLICATION FOB PERMISSION TO CHANGE THE POINT OF DIVERSION AND PLACE OF USE OF A PORTION OF THE PUBLIC WATERS OF THE STATE OF NEVADA HERETOFORE APPROPRIATED Appllcatton No. 4M10 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVfeN, that on the 2nd day of November, 1111, Robert C. Lewit and Vivian Lcwii of Moapa, Nevada, made application to the Stote Engineer of Nevada for permltilon to change Ihe point of diveriton and place of use ofO.SM c.fi., a portion of water heretofore ippropriited under Permit 27271, Certlflcate MM Water will be diverted from an underground source at a new point located wilhin (he NEV< SEV. Section S7, T14S., RME., MDBAM., or at a point from which the EV4 corner of tald Section n heart N. 43 IS' SS" E., a diatonce ef 70.11 feet. Water will be nied fer irrigation parpaae* from January 1*1 to December 31*1 f each year. The exIaUng point ef diveriton wu from an underground tource locetod wiUiln Ihe 8EW NEV4, Section S7. T14S.. BME.. MDBAM.. or al 1 point from wliich the NE corner of tald Section 27 heart N. ST 3r E, a dittanceoflMlfeet. Signed: Petor G Morrot PETER G. NORROS, P.E. Stote Engineer Date of flrtt publlcallon May 13.1882 Date of laat publication June 10.1888 B May U, M, 27. June 3. 10. 1M2 LEGAL NOTICE 73 Dodge to be lold to higbeit bidder when title it obtoined by mechanic's lien. Serial No. WP28M3G137441, Licenic No. OOOGVL-Ca. platet. Begiitered .owner Gee. J. Newlin, 1M41 (irove PI., Bloomington, Ca. Legal Owner: Bcnencial Finance Co.. 331 N. E. St., San Sernadino. Ca. Notice it hereby liivtn that I, Wilher Towing, ,^48 N. Parkion, Henderton, iMev. will tell above mentioned property on Wed June 23.1M2 at 10 a.m. at Hi N Parkion. Henderton, Nev gMlS. We retcrve Ihe right to bid. H May 8.13. M. 188S LEGAL NOTICE 7 Ponliac Coupe to be told to nighett bidder when title it obtoined by mechanic't lien. Serial No. 2C11B8US23970, Llcente No. TCL187 Nev. plalet. Regltlered owner Richard A. or Pamela K. Home, 17S Metropoliton. Henderson. Legal Owner: Barb Begley. Box 3M. Henderton, Nev. Notice it hereby given that 1, Walker Towing, 348 N. Parkton. Henderson. Nev. will sell above mentioned property on Mon May M. IMS at 10 am at S48 N. Parkaen. Henderson. Nev. We reserve the right to bid. H May 8,13,20, IMS LEGAL NOTICE 73 Buich, Hardtop to be sold to highest bidder when title is obtoined by mechanic's lien Serial No. 4LS7 H3HSS4S87. License No. TJIN8 Nev. plates. Begiitered owner Joanne Gray, 2101 Constoncc Avc, N. Us Vegss. Nev 88030. Ugal Owner: Same. Notice is hereby given that I. Walker rowing. SM N. Parksoa, Henlerson, Nev. will sell above menlioned properly on Men.. May 24.1882 It 10 a.m. at MSN. Parkion. Henderson, Nev. We reserve the right to bid. H May 8. 13. 20, 1N2 LEGAL NOTICE 1874 Mudi Hardtop to be told Ib bigheil bidder when title it obtoined by merhinic's iten. Sertol No. LA23S1M117. License No. TJEN4 Nev. pities. Registered owner Arthur Brown, 1148 Douglas Dr.. L.V. Nev. 88182. Ugal Owner: Same. Notice is hereby given that 1. Walker Towing, S48 N. Parkton, Henderson, Nev. will tcil ibove menlioned property on Wed., June 23,1H2 al 18 a.m. It SM N. Parkton. Henderton. 'iev. We reterve Ihe right to bid. :i May 8. 13, M, 1882 LEGAL NOTICE 1878 Mercury to be told to highett bidder when UUc it obtoined by mechanic's lien. Serial No. 8KMFS3S88S. Licenac No. iUXmv Callfernia platet. Regltlered owner Jerry D. Ardeo, IMl I8U1 St., Oceino, Ci. Ugal Owner: Bcnencial Finance Co. ef S*. Callfernia. 1312 Grant Ave., Arroyo Grande. Ca. Notice it hereby given that I. Walher Towing. M8 N. Parkton. Henderton, Nev. will tell ibeve meaUoned property on Man., June 21,1882 al 18 a.m. al SM N. Parkaen. Hendereea. Nev. 8MIS. We reeerve Ike rigkl to kid. 'I May 8.13. M. 1888 IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTBICT COUBT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, IN AND FOB THE COUNTY OF CLARK NO D488M GORDON L PIVODA. PUinUif vt. VEL M. PIVODA, Defendant SUMMONS THE STATE OF NEVADA SENDS GRBBTINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT: NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITH OUT YOUB BRING HEABD UNLESS YOU BESPOND WITHIN M DAYS BEAD THE INFOBNATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A ciril CempUlnl kai been flled by the plaintiff agalnat yea. 1 If yeu with to defend thi* iiwtuil. yeu mutt, within M diyi after Ihit Summont la terved on you, exclativc ef Ihe day of tervice. file witk Ikit Court I written pleading in retpontc to Ikii ComplalBl. S. Unlett you rctpoad. your defiull will be catered upoB ippllcalioa of the plaiatlff aad Ihit Court may eater a Judgmeal agaiatt yeu fer the relief demanded in Ihe Complaiat. which could retail IB the taking of moaey or property or other relief reqaetled la the Complaint. 3 If you with to teeh the advice of an attarncy in thit matter, yeu theuld do to promptly to that your rctpoBic may be flled on time. 4. You are required to terve your reiponic upon plelnUfr* iltorney, whote iddreii it JAMES A. WAGNEB, SS88 CIvto Center Drive. NerU Ui Vega*. Nevada 888M. Thli I* aa actiea to ditielve the bead* ef matrimony heretofore exIsUng bctweea Plaiatlff and Defea(s| Uretto Bowmaa LOBETTA BOWMAN, aerkef Court By (SI Lydia Redrtqnei LYDIA BODBIQUEZ. Deputy Cterk DATE: Jaa. M. 188S H • Apr. M. May 8.13, N. ISR. NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOB PERMISSION TO APPROPRIATE THE PUBLIC WATERS OF THE STATE OF NEVADA MAYOS, 188S Applicilion No 4S270 Notice it hereby given Ihil on the 28th diy of Jinuiry 1881 Derrick I Hodton of Ui Vegat, Stote of Nevada made applica• tion to Ihe Stote Engineer of Nevada for permlitlon to appropriate 0.030 oft tecond foot of the public waters of Ihe Stote of Nevada. Diversion ii to be made from an underground source al 1 point locited wilhin the NW.. SEW. Section 4, T206., R80E.. MDBAM.. or al 1 point Itom which the SV corner of said Section 4 heart 8. 33< M' M" W., a distonce of 2,188.M feel. Water will be used for domestic snd qusii • municipal purposes from Jsnuary Isl to December 31it of each year. Date ef nrsi puhllcalton May 13, 1N2. Date of last publication June 10.1882. Signed: Peter G. Morro* PE'TER G. NORROS. P.E. Stote Engineer B Nay 13. M. V, June 3. 10. 1M2 OFFICIAL NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Scaled bidi. tubjecl to the conditions conttined in Ihe Contract Documents, will be received at Ihe offlce of the Henderson Cily Clerk, 243 Water Slreet. Henderson. Nevada. 8N1S, up to the hour and date sUpulated below, at which time the bids will be publicly opened by Ihe City Clerk. The nime ind addres* of the Bidder wiUi Bid TlUe and Contract Number mu*t appear on the ouuide of the icaied envelope. CONVENTION CENTER LANDSCAPING Contract Number: 81-n32 Bid Opening: 2.00 P N., May M. 1882. Conference Room, City Hall, 243 Water SUeet. Henderton. Nevada 8M1S. Ucalion: Located al the corner of Water Slreet ind Atlantic Avenue in Ihe Cily of Henderton, Nevada. Description of Work: The work will contiil of tupplying all of the neceisary material and doing the necessary worh to landscape Ihe Henderson Convention Center. Bids must be lubmltted on Ihe forms furnished by the City and accompanied by a certified check, hid bond, or cashter's check in the amount of flve percent (S
PAGE 40

1W Pagf 40 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday, May 20,1982 VMli 'ti^Itl'iMii*KUnilei's, NEED HELP? cll Rowlands, The HaBdynuB SS4-306S REMODELS-ADDinONS NEW STRITTI'RES. RESIDENTIAL commercial. Lie. No. 194S7 Skyline BIdg Co. ZSS-OOOS or 381-3814. B.C. SAND. GRAVEL, TOP SOIL LANDSCAPE ROCK. Call tSS-tUS. B.C. CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATIONS KItcheos, Batiit, Floor* ne EstimatM LIcenicd. Bonded 293-7818 j PEST SHIELD Fantastic Ultra sonic sound insect repellent. Pests & insects leave forever. Maneyback guarantee. 199 95 per unit. Covers ISOO sq ft. 3 yr. warranty. S8S-9395. WALLPAPERING & PAINTING Interior A Exterior decorating Information, professional results guaranteed. Call Laureen for free estimate. Reasonable rates l.j y^Med 293-7581. B.C. Jeep Parts Available D0N7 JUNK m The Bfigine can be rebuit cheaper then replacing the car. SCOWS Kesterson Ranch 3 m HWY. 95 Specialist in Jeep I Rebuilding So. of RR Pass on CERAMIC • Masonry Concrete additions. Remodeling. Free Esti mates. 451-1225 eves. SEWING, ALTERATIONS, MENDING done at reasonable rates. Exp. 293-7081, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. B.C. CARPENTRY rooflng patio covers convert garages, Boulder City resident, free estimate*, ref.,' 293-7579. B.C. RELIABLE exchange student desires work, will do any odd Jobs, call 293 4937 ask for Cesar. B C. 56S-S3nr M1-U7 WALLPAPERING Excellent references Custom Work {Painting Exterior &I (Interior Free Estimates| Call Joe 293-1662. RESPONSIBLE YOUNG MAN will do lawn mowing. 293-3863 or 293-3578. B.C. \.\ CUSTOM LAWN SERVICE Mow, clean up, vacuum fertilixe, edge, trim rototil, renovate. Hdn. • B.C. FREE ESTIMATE 293-4556 LET A VETERAN do It for you. Yard work & cleanup work, painting & whatever. Call Tony, 564 1159. HOUSE SITTING, your bouse will be safe in my care while you're on vacation this summer. Excellent ref. Rates avail, for all summer, monthly or weekly. Call Caria at 293-3269 after 5 p.m., Non. Thurs B.C. CONCRETE Guaranteed: Profes-I slonal work at lowl Iprices. Free Estimates.[ Tall Residential Artists| St. Cont. No. 17676. Lou Caputo 293-6816 B.C. • REMODEL Large or small concrete work. Patio It room additions. Call Ray. 565-7534. MURRAY MAINT. SERVICE General repair & handyman. Carpentry, painting, glass, coolers etc. 293-5110 *fe*MMitt**kiMHMM CONCRETE WORK Block Work Cooldecking. Driveways, patios, floors, cooldeck additions, patio walls, stone, brick, etc. 20 yrs. exp Quality work. Ph. 564 2339 AIR CONDITIONERS fepolred dr serviced at recession prices. 565-9203. A-Z Vacuum and Sewing Center 331 8. Water St. Henderson. 565-7170 LITTLE DEALER LITTLE PRICES BUDD APPLIANCE SERVICE Quality Repair Worlt Guaranteed (702) 293-6564 or 293-4556 We repair most brands — 20 Years Experience •Dryers •Freeiers BOULDER REALTY 293-3232 4I(> Npvada Highway Boulder ( ity, Nv. •Compactors •Hot Water Heaters •Washers •Refi-igerators •Dishwashers •Garbage Disposals s-^afi^,-^ ID .SPRINKLER SYSTEMS INSTALLED. Lawns mowed, yds. cleaned, trash hauled. Most anything. 564-3065 or 565-1887. AARON FENCING Frot Estimotos Chain link A Wood Fencing 30 Years Exp. Ph 451 8)90 GENERAL CONTRACTOR ALL PHASES OF CAR PENTRY WORK RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Lie. No. 14492 293^284 B.C BONANZA READYMOC I CONCRETI' PRODUCTS 564-7372 564-7371 DELIVERY M0N.-8AT. HANDY MAN I Harlow's material and repair service. Most repair* 1 around your home. Ans. service Ph. 293-3911 or 293-6172 THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICK-UP, •49-2374-5-6. Call Charlotte 870-9171 or 293-3128. HANDYMAN BEN DEPUE, "Henderson'* Licensed Handyman" will help you with remodeling or fixup Carpentry, plumbing, electrical, cement, fireplaces, painting, stucco, patio covers. Ph. 565-7468. LAWNMOWING & TRIMMING, res., reliable teenage boys. Call Garth SchuU, 293-4585 B.C. fig@S4^ ^fMumz SERVICE 940 JlVI.BM80tJl8t cm* NV. Factory authorized warranty service HOME AUTO REPAIR, AND SERVICE. All repairs, all motor work, transmission repair, tune-ups, brake Jobs, all boat repair. No Job too big. Free estimates. RV repair. 3S4-0398. BACKHOE, LOADER, DUMP TRUCK All for $30 per hr. 293-2115. B.C ^^m^ ^^s Help IS here. \OUC;ANNOW QUAUi V&iUJY' w>th tlu.".,e.seller ,'.;,r-.!'j1.buy dov/n rNMA.ind(-lher S(;!ect proqranv. odprrd hrrf> PRE-WIRE Wc^t^tx TELEPHONt • CUSTOM HOMES • TRACT HOMES • C0ND08-APTS. MOBILE HOMES Tele •SALES • INSTALLATION SERVICE Co. Inc. Ut us fce your phone doctor We • >ki' ""• Sttte lie. 19230 B.C. Lie. 2728. Phone (70?) 293-7239. IS.? W I.AkKMKAl) l)R!VK HKNDKRSON. NKVADA PHONK 56,S8*47 ?f5^ Rosecrest Gibinets^bic HENDERSON. NEVADA Cwtoii Kitditiit \ 565-7472 ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR A & M Electric Inc. InstallaUon li Repair* 1733 Boulder Hwy Henderson Nevada Lie 7292-A 564-5311 laamaa i iiinnr i n i t'iotfla : FIX-IT-SHOP ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Electrical wiring, new con*truction, remodel*, additions, extra circuits and repair. Licenae No. 016276. Insured Bonded. Phone 293-6372 w0m^ ^* W **<** M M t MM M > M > M r* i (i I Kl I mC ^OMl^ DECORATING SXRVIOILI. rcLLtll 9 "V„,| ciinX get a belter Feller"" • AJIWNCTTLEAMNGDECOjtttTNt:? • QUAUTY WORKMANSHIP / GUARANTEED WAGES ONLY ffirrsRioB A RONALD FEL£EK EXTKiioi ••^Wn V M ** M ***i**>—*W>* WE XL GIVE YOU THE PROFESSIONAL ADVICE YOU NEED ABSOLUTELY NO OBLIGATIONiWE TAKE TRADE-INS AND BUY EQUITIESt! MOTIVATED SELLER • Architect designed and built this 2.000 square foot beauty for his family located on half acre horse loned lot. Totally unique In design and execution. It offers a separaU master suite with huge cedar lined closet. Great owner carried terms ease your move up to quality. Call 56M947 or eves. 564-3208. OWNER ANXIOUS lost his Job and must sell to Uke out-of-sUte position. Just completed this 1580 foot custom home with 3 huge bedrooms and deucbed two car garage on fenced 97 x 150 foot lot. Asking $74,500 but will consider ALL offers'. Call 565-8947 or eves. 564-3208. A PIECE OF HEAVEN Couldn't be lovller than the leafy glade In which this Urge 4 bedroom, 2 bath home resides. Huge shade trees and mature lawns* shrubs provide an enviable environment for the kids to olav In the pool, while over 1700 feet of open floor plan welcome you In only $70,000. Call 565-8947 or eves. 564-3208. PERCHED HIGH ON A CORNER Newer tract location with block • walled back yard, lovely decorating, family room, alarm system and something even better ~ a low Interest VA loan you can Uke over. Call 565-8947 or eves. 564-3208. YOU DONT NEED MONEY! Have Investor with several newer three bedroom tract homes Interested 'In trading for Vanwagenen Townhouses or? on exchange basis lets trade! Call 565-8947 or eve*. 564-3208. CITY VIEW TERRACE only one left! New three bedroom, two bath,dlshwasher, range, oven, drapes T-0 plus a garage. Our most popular model priced at $58 950 with buy down interest can be financed IFHA or VA. Call 565-8947 or eve*. 565-9453. CANT QUALIFY? no worrying you can Uke over this loan with no qualifying A new three bedroom, two baths with landscaping and sprlnker*. Under priced at $67,000 Call 565-8947 or eves. 565-9453 fo' more Information. tSELF LANDSCAPING miiai' White Rock Special 9< tq. ft 9* Colored Rock Landscape Sand Railroad Ties Sand & Gravel It'll Gro Top Soil Stepping Stones ^ U PICK UP OR WE DELIVER (Reduced Delivery Rates to B.C.) 1934 Parkson (off Sunset) Belwnn Boulder Hwy. A GibtM lU LANDSCAPE SUPP LY, INC. CALL FOR! FREE ESTlMAn Hours 7-5 Henderson, Nev 564-7645 J & F S( KAP MKTAI. .112 W Knsler M lleiMlerson. Nevada 54 2*1.1 AIAJMINIJM CANS 25' LB. %UICK /#0 TV&AFPUANCERENTAL SILLMEftftELLS 'U8( Appliance WATER ST. HENDERSON 5^5-8798 k BETTEirWA Y OF LI VING King sized comfort In thl* spacious 3 bedroom home In established area. Close to schools, pool, and all summer recreation. Cozy wood burning fireplace. Large garage with plenty of workspace. This is a value packed home you should not miss seeing. 886,900. OWN THE WORLD This exciting, contemporary home has an unlimited 360 degree view. Relax in the spa tub then dry off by the fireplace in mstr. bdrm. Located on over ^* acre private! THE POSSIBLE DREAM Lovely two story home featuring 4 bdrms., 2H baths on Boulder City Golf Course. Covered patio for summertime relaxation, large used brick fireplace in famllyroom, formal living and dining areas. Excellent financing now available. Call today, 8135,000. CONDOS or TOWNHOIWES for Investment or for maintenance tret living. We have a variety of floorplans and price ranges to please your pocket book as well as tantllize your needs for luxurious, carefree living. Call for further Info. LAND MILLION DOLLAR VIEW Property available overlooking Lake Mead or perhaps you prefer the colorful desert mountain ranges. We have several to choose from. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY COMPLETE AND READY TO GO. Artfully and tastefully decorated for relaxed dining In this centrally located restaurant. All the finest In fixtures and equipment. Business growing everyday. Excellent opportunity to become financially Independent. Call for appointment and details. NEW. CLEAN, & SENSIBLY PRICED 2 bdrm. rental. Never been lived in. Located in central Boulder City. 8450 per month. Call today for viewing. PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AVAILABLE INQUIRE AT BOULDER REAL'^Y SALES ASSOCIATES June Hansen, Broker 293-4223 JaneGrider 293-5949 Janice Crawford 293-2275 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY 293-3232 IN THE HEART OF CLEAN GREEN BOULDER I 5,^ SUN REALTY Inc. "THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS" 1311 Nevada Hwy., Bouldw City, Nevada 89005 24 HOURS 293-2151 WE HAVE MANY OTHER LISTINGS ... CALL AND LET US KNOW YOUR NEEDS TODAY!!! FABULOUS FEATURES! Custom living with magnificent wood and tile throughout. Spacious 1880 sq. ft. includes sewing room. Marina Highlands. 8134,900. SMILE IN STYLE! Delightful 4 bdrm. In Vllle Del Prado. Beautiful family room sports fireplace and wetbar. Terrific assumption. Price Reduction! Only $108,000. LUSCIOUS LUXURY! Dreamy relaxing In your own private spa & sauna In master bedroom. Panoramic view. 3 bdrm., 2V^ bath. Custom, quality, comfort. Only 8175,000. COUNTRY LIVING Enjoy this 2 bdrm.. 1 bath Searchlight home near Cottonwood Cove & Lake. Fishing, Swimming. Sunning! Reduced $10,000 for quick sale. Only $32,900 & owner will carry some paper. COZY AND CUTE. 2 bdrm., 1 bath on comer lot. Clean. tn*h. Inviting. New steel siding, manicured lawn. A steal at $55,000. INVESTMENT SPECIAL. Price reduced. Duplex In excellent ara. Close convenient. Call for dcUlU! CLASSY C .iTOM LIVING. Exquisite features. Gorgeous view ,0 proposed B.C. 2nd 9-hole golf course. Fireplace iL sunken living room. Plus! Pool. Spa, Patios, heated & cooled handlman's garage. See to believe! EARTHLY PARADISE. Heavenly decoration abounds In this 3 bdrm., 1 bath home. Magnificent kitchen. Convenient location. Only $72,500. COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE characterize this lovely 4 bdrm., 2 bath home in Lewis subdivision. Picnic In your gorgeous yard all summer long. Take over 8S% VA loan Just 894,750. BEAT THE HEAT! In this gorgeous 3 bedroom home with a lovely pool to wile away the hot summer hours. Winter will delight you In the large family room with floor to ceiling fireplace! Don't miss this! Just $94,500. SUPER SWEETHEART. 2 bdrm., 2 bath with den in a great neighborhoodrFabulous assumption. Hurry before this one goes at only $66,000. DOLL HOUSE 3 bdrm.. IS bath. Only $74,960 with $17,500 down. Buyer can a**unic an FHA loan of $57,000 at ll.S<^ with payment* of $511 per month. Call for deUlls. MODERN MAGNIFICENCE. Enjoy a view of Lake Mead'* blue waters from living room of this spacious Executive home. 2300 plus sq. ft! Terrific terms. Only $137,500! SUPER NICE! Decorated In earth tosie*. Lush decorated landscaping. 3 bedroom, 1% bath home. Adjacent to custom home area. $1I8,S00. WE HAVE BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES F0R8ALE Call us fiar deUlls. .. CONDOMINIUMS CHIC AND CHARMING Is this super condo with lovely decoration throughout. Enjoy your own private yard And only $71,500. BOULDER SQUARE, LA DOLCE VITA & LAKE TER RACE CONDOMINIUMS. Call us for more details and price range. MOBILE HOMES MODERN CUSTOM. In lovely B.C. Park's adult section you'll find this clean and fresh mobile home, with extra extras! Come and see! Only $54,950. LOVELY FAMILY MOBILE HOME In Mt. VlsU Park All fenced In with pretty fruit and shade trees. Clean and neat 2 bdrm., 2 bath featuring covqred patio, stor age and parking. Only $54,000! HENDERSON LAS VEGAS CLEAN MODERN CONDO. Don't miss this sharp 2 bdrm. condo. Enjoy convenient extras like kitchen pan try and auto garage door opener. Owner ready to sell! Only $57,500. LAND SPECTACULAR VIEW! EnJoy life's pleasures. Dis cover this fabulous lot on the lake. Good terms avalla ble. Call today! $57,500. TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE! That's right! Two Sub 11 lots $28,500. Call for all the deUlls. "B" HILL AWAITS YOU ... Two lots reduced to sell on San Felipe ... $20,000 and $25,000. Owner will consldei trade for equity in B.C. home or a boat. GORGEOUS LAKE VIEW A lot that comes with plans Owner will consider trade for equity in home. Only $39400! FABULOUS TERMS! Don't mis* thii xlent city building lot. 70 X100 In e*tabllshed neighborhood. You'll be glad you found this one. BRANCHING INTO RANCHING mightjustbefbryou! Private country living on this heavenly 2.25 acre ranch estate lot with xlent term*. Sound appealing? It is! Only $125,000. PRIME COMMERCIAL ... 4.63 acre*. GREAT TERMS on Lake View lot. Sac. Price only $31,500. Located on Cul-DeLAS VEGAS AREA: 13.38 acres. Warm Springs Road, and 2.27 acres on Happy Lane ... Super terms. RISIDENTUL ACREAGE INVESTMENT COMMERCIAL MQUME AIOUT TNf TKOR HOMI PROnCTKNI PUN M^ii':"" f Thursday, May 20,1982 m GARAGE MOVING SALE, ???????' 665 Otono, Sat,, May 22, 8 ????????? a.mto?B.C. ??????? ??????? • GARAGE SALE It CRAFT BALE: Bikes, chlldrens clothes, hou*eh9ld Items, much nice misc. Frl, not before 9:30 Ul 4. Sat, 8 to 2. 884 Jerl Lane, B,C. .'^?"5" GARAGE SALE: sat. I !!!11!:L_____ "'" Sun^ May 22* 23, 9 to 5, CARAGE SALE, Sat., May 1827 Muchacha Dr., 22 in > m tn 2 n m .Stnvr 7??7??>7??????????????????? If you're driven about YARD good economy, here's a quick quiz about cars that may help. 1827 Muchacha Green Valley Park. SALE, Sat,, May 22nd from 8 a,m. to noon, 115 Hickory, Hdn. 1. Last year how many diesel cars were sold in the United States? (a) .'S.OOO (b) .^0,000 (c) more than 500,000 ^2. Some diesel half-ton pick-up trucks have a range between fill ups of (a) 840 miles (b) 540 miles (c) 340 YARD SALE: 206 Zinc. Sat. miles? all day. 3. Japan's first diesel powered passenger ear was GARAGE SALE: Sat., May SUPER YARD SALE: U-name-it, we-got-it. Corner of Arthur & Carson Way, Hlllcrest Subdivision. Sat. 8 til ?? YARD SALE: Fri., May 21. 3 baby beds from $25 to $50,1 small Oak baby bed, tots of baby clothing. New & used. From 25 cents to $5. Summer Is cornel ng • we also have large & small fans, and coolers. Lot more things so come see. 121 Maple, Hdn., Nev, GARAGE SALE, Sat., May 22,10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stove, 10 sp. bike, tables, books 6t baby Items, 847 Montera Ln., B.C. YARD SALE, clothes, misc., moving, 701 Elm. Sp. 98, Sat, 8 a.m. to 12 noon. B.C. YARD SALE:'May 22,8 a.m. Remodeling sale. Dishes, clothes, bedspreads, pictures & misc. Everything priced to sell. 311 lln St. C^ll 564-5353. produced in (a) 1951 (b) )961 (c) 1971? (q) K 'J3|ep nzns| ue ie uoneiujoj •ui ajoiu ia8 OS|B UBO no^ 'siasdip )noqE djoiu sjapeaj s\\a'\ qaiqM isaSiQ s.japeayl Ae|\ ai)i u! pE ue se\\\ /iuvdxuoo iBi(x nznsi 'sias' -aip JO jaifeiu auo jaquinu s.uedep Xq apeui s, 11 sdn Iljj uaaM'iaq sa|iiu ofrS • '*'^" siajj dn->|3id pasBq-8uoi e 'lasaip auo () S Ajiunoo siqt Ul pjos aiBiA SJBD las -!P 88i'02S pjooaa K is6l UJ (0) 1 ;SaaMSNV < ^ PETS I 22. 9 to 3. Sewing machine, clothing, bedspread, collectables Including Disney & castiron toys. Other misc. items. 618 Fernbrook Dr., Highland Hills, Hdn. MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE. Sat. 9 to 4. Magic Chef dbl oven. Porta Potty, camp stove, pool pump, mini bike, humldiner, clothes, toys, much more. 235 Fullerton. YARD SALE: 641 Paloma Dr., Boulder City. Lots of goodies. Bed, loveseat, couch, clothes, many other Items. Sat. & Sun. from 8 to ?? HANDS TIED FOR LACK OF CASH? INSTANT CASH 1st., 2nd., 3rd. ..lOHTGAGES. TRl ST DEEDS Credit Problems' Real Estate Problems'' l.ocalionO'roblems'' Trust deetNtrobiems" Family Problems? WE RESOLVE Reasonable Rates It Interest Ask your neitlhbor he knows u> KOZAL'S 736-7006 or 870-6456 TWO FREE PUPPIES, Cocker Spaniel mix. 565-1121. ST. BERNARD, needs good home w-room to run, 1 yr. old, male. Best offer. Call 293-1793 Tues. thru Fri. after 3 p.m., ask for LeAnn. B.C. FOR SALE: Red, black & tan Dobermans. Male & female. Call after 6, 564-7126, Purebred Bay Gelding, '79 Thorbeau X AM Indraffa; solid color, quick learner ready for serious work. Purebred Chest. Filly, '80, Storml Bey X CG ThorHannah; stra, strip, snip, hind socks. DBL reg, '/i Arab-Pinto mare m '76 Gay Prince X Sweeta. Proven producer, halter ribbons. Not ridden recently, very affectionate. Current shots and worming. Phone 645-1464. GARAGE SALE: 3 family. Nice children's clothing, lots of misc. 8 to noon. Sat. 22nd. 430 Chateau. YARD SALE, 635 UUh St., Frl. 5-21, 8 a.m. til ? Sat. 5-22, 8-10 a.m. Bike, antique grinder, etc. YARD SALE: 5-22,7 a.m. no presale, bathtub, furn. & misc. 409 Ave. B, B.C. HUGE GARAGE SALE, furn., bicycles & odds & ends. 650 Del Prado, 8-5 Sat. 5-22. YARD SALE: Construction tools & equipment. Camper shell, telephone recorder, B-W TV, 8 lug wheel & tires. Lowboy trailer. Video recorder, household items. Sat. & Sun. Corner of Ash & Lake Mead Dr. SEWING MACHINE &I ifACUUM CLEANERl SALES & SERVICE. arensens. 509 Ave. C. 293-3770, B.C. VOICE, PIANO LESSONS. Vocal specialist. All ages, Raye's Home Studio of Musical Arts. Ph. Flo Raymond, 565-8469. Plan now for fall lessons. • DATA PROCESSING • • ivtlUkls • • INerd PrscifilstIPtyroU • • I Bsstrtl Lt4tr I Invoicing • • I Killing Lilt I Inyintory • • 964-7419or iMofsitlofl* YARD SALE: Sat, May 22,9 to 5. Clothes. Infant to adult sizes, books, dishes, drapes, misc. 1208 Colt Dr. (off Magic Way). WHITE BABY RABBITS FOR SALE. 565-8423. GARAGE SALE: Fri. & Sat. Baby items, clothes, lots of misc. 9 to 4. 729 GreenFREE: 4 Hens. Rhode Isway Rd land Reds. 564-7653. •—ZZZZZZZZZZZ BRANIFF EMPLOYEE FTEE: TO good home Poo^D. SALE. Old Avon hotdie. male^pricot color. ''^^^ -^ i.L. 11^' Verv eood watchdoB & children's items, books, i^d' w chiidrVn S'y? ':r\v.l"rr?oZ>t old. Call between 9:30 ^.'^''".f•,?'• l* "ew ..m.&12:30p.m.564-2830. Jems,^^ 'If, J-„%^ ^^ Glenwood Lane. 565-6109. MUSIC LESSONS IN YOUR HOME Piano. Organ, Guitar Banjo, Mandolin, Volce.1 College accredited teacher. Paula Busch. 564-2382 or 564-3717 a.m. PSYCHIC (for those seeking the Truth), 4567258. EXPERftNCED BOOKKEEPER will do bookkeeping for small business In Hdn. In my home. Will pick up & deliver. 564-3495. Typing'""EMI By Andrea Letters, resumes, term papers, documents, statistical, manuscripts, etc. Editing, Guaranteed professional, reasonable, 293-4665 293-4078 MOVING SALE, color TV, radios, dishes, linens, costume Jewelry, ladies shoes & clothing, Ig. sizes, — 2 dressers, desk as is, misc. household goods etc. Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m. til noon, 800 Ave, A, B,C, JUDI'S STENOGRAPHIC SERVtCE" Professional Stenographer Statistical Reporis-Manuscrlpts-Contracts-Graphs egal Documents-Rough Copy-Letters-Transcriptionl YOU NAME IT-I CAN TYPE IT '293-6605 Omce 293-2515-After 6 p.m. & Weekend* GARAGE SALE, Sat,, May 22.8:30 a,m, to 4 p.m. Baby Items, canning jars, books, games, houseplants & much more. 1217 Ave. G, B.C. •" rrrrrffrimnjjujj BOULDER ELECTRIC Licensed, bonded, insured. Lie. No. 15187. Call 293-4899. M W l M WM a***WH< M > M S^ SHORT ORDER COOK dc WAITRESS, call 2933301 for Interview. B.C. WANTED reliable, mature person to cook and serve food 5 days, Tues. thru Sat so Snack Drug. RELIEF care institution, Thurs, Frl., Sat., St. Judes Ranch for children 293-3131, B.C, REAL ESTATE LICENSEE'S needed. Up to 80% commission. Call Roberts Realty 565-8947. DISTRIBUTOR WANTED: To handle name brand beauty products in the Hdn., B.C. area. Call 878-4525. Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 41 FOUND, box of tools, Henderson area, call and .identify tools, and when lost, 5(5-9817, recorder phone. B.C. LOST, Sit. afternoon, green pet bird, vicinity of 600 block of Ave. B., does not ny. 293-6116. evet. B.C. DIVERSIFY YOUR INCOME. We're expanding rapidly. Looking for success oriented snd ambitious Individual who want to grow with us. If you are serlou* call Success Builders International for app't. Absolutely no telephone interview. 56S-1997. \ BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES' RETIRED or semi-retired local man looking for part-time light maintenance work. Must be established local resident, sober and dependable, (Maintenance exp. & references preferred). For details contact Mr. Ziegler at Railroad Pass Casino, Men. A Thurs. 8 a.m. to 10 M.m. ONLY. BUSPERSON dc cooking positions open. Health card required. Apply in person between 2 di 4. Slzzler Steak House, 110 N. Boulder Hwy., Henderson. REGISTERED NU^SE: Perform* physical exams, assists physician, help to plan, coordinate di implement the program. Requires considerable discretionary Judgment: ability to relate to minority dt low income clientele. Must have current Nev, RN LICENSE, and 2 yrs. experience. Salary range, $12,427 $17,007. Applications accepted until 4 p.m. Monday, May 17, 1982 at ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY BOARD OF CLARK COUNTY, 2228 Comstock Dr., Las Vegas, Nev. 89030, Hairitage Styling Parlor 10U Atlantic Apply In person. Thurs.. Fri orKat. HELP WANTED; RcsUurant Cashier data terminal. Relief shift. Railroad Pass Casino. WANTED: Housekeeper to watch 3 yr. old for summer. Call before 10 or after 7, 565-9323 or 564-7643. VEHICLES ] WANTED: Babysitter 2 days a wk. Mon. di Frl. Mature woman preferred. 293-5006. ^ • WILLING TO GIVE" • TLC TO YOUR CHIL-tf • DREN while you work.^ 'Odd hours Is my spe-# [cialty. Call nowj 564-5108. \ LICENSED CHILD CARE. Snack &,hot lunch. Infants ft up. 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Please call 5044770. JOB INFO: Cruise Ship Jobs. Also Houston. Dallas, Overseas Jobs. 602-99li-6426, Dept, 0410, Ph. call refund. $106.80 DAILY EARNINGS working lto3hrs.a day at home. Your earnings fully guaranteed In writing. For complete details & application, please send a stam|ed self addressed envelope. FJG, 216 Palo Verde, Nogales. AZ. 85621. IF YOU ARE TIRED OF A HUMDRUM EXISTANCE and want something more out of life, call SFCVAUGHT at 385-0301 today. The Nevada Army National Guard can offer positions In Armor, Law Enforcement, Mechanics, Communications, Photo Journalism. To qualify for these fields you must be a HS Grid, good physical shape, and have a sincere desire to advance. If you're sincere, check uS out... you'll be pleasantly surprised. Sales People Route People Business People Call (800) 227-9970 1980 TOYOTA COROLLA. Automatic, 4 dr., PS & PB, air. 31,000 mi. $4800. 564-5912. FOR SALE: 30* 1978 Mobile Scout. Rally Master model. $11,000 firm. 565-6949. 1977 DODGE MAXI-VAN. $5500. AM/FM radio, CB, AC, dbl. bed, sink, stove, ref., thermal heat, fully insulated. Dual battery. Exc. cond. 731-1556. and after 4, 565-8252. 1981 SUZUKI TS 250. Almost new. Less than 1200 mi. $1175. 451-1723. 1970 INTERNATIONAL TRAVELALL. clean, air, hitch, $1400. 293-3508, ;B.C. pi^lSSrai^ntM condition, 30,000 miles. Auto, air, cruise control, power steering. $1,000 plus takeover payments or best offer. Call 798-78S2. Ask for OLDER MODEL JEt:^ PARTS 2-4 cyl. F heads, complete. Call Lois' 564-1B81, DRIVER S LICENSE TESTS Tuesday and Wednesday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m City Annex, Civic Center 200 Water Street Room 22A. Henderson 75 AMF CRESTLINER. 20'. 188 Mercury cruiaer. Stereo. CB. Tandem axel trailer. Full cover $6M0. Ph. after 6 p.m. 55-1480. 78 CAD. Fully loaded plus CB. Eldorado Brltz. 18.000 mi. $10,000.565-1480 after 6 p.m. CHEV. MOTORS REBUILT dt USED, transmissions rebuilt & used. All makes di models. Guaranteed. All boat repair dc parts Si service. RV repair. Call 384-0398. HYDE ASSOCIATES IICENSID REAL ESTATE IROKER 1028 WYOMING STREET BOULDEK CITY. NEVADA 89005 Pi 293-6014 Eves. 293-2144 MLS 647-1890. An Affirmative HENDERSON LICENSED fmnlnv'.?"" "P"*"'"*"""'' DAY CARE: TLCI Infants To receive a pacltage to employe^-. ^^^ ^ ^^^ ^^ lunches & determine if you should r ^ ~Z^ snacks. After schoolers consider a business of WE'RE LOOKING FOR welcome 564-3849 your own witJi a repeat AMBITIOUS PEOPLE. necessity product in a No door to door selling. lucrative "energy savAmway-it's a better way LICENSED NURSERY ingjlighting field, of life. 565-7476. CARE FOR UNDER TWO working wUh Indus — -YRS. OLD. In a home like jrial, commercial, inLADIES, House of Lloyd, C Ca''re*2M-7?7VB c" ^tit"'i<>nal ^nd govthe nations No. 1 toy gift _1^„„_____ ernmental accounts party program hiring 1_~~~~_~_1 We are a ten year old SreaSUPERVISER,man^ILL SUPERVISE 1 "fn^afe ^w oPe" age toy demonstrators school age child this fna in^hic area Eaual June Dec. free training summer, nice home, pool. onnirtunitv emoiover & supplies, no investref. 293-0173. B.C. opportunity employer ment. Call Kathy .r.T,~J^,n~^1iT,~. 642-1496 BC Z—Z ^^^ YOUR OWN Jean '— RELIABLE BABYSITSportswear or Infant HELP WANTED: Exper. TING in my home. AnyPreteen •' • ^'* Apwaitress, able to speak time. Hdn. Trailer EsP*"' -•'ij:*" ciiVvlr' Spanish, over 21 must tales area. Call Debbie, „J"J;,T.,r „ 3 know mexican food. Call 564-5925. STORE). Offering all Nain person. 1101 Ariiona tionslly Known Brands St El Patio. B.C. s"*^"" • • Jordache, Chic, WILL BABYSIT In my Lee, LevI, Vanderbilt, • -home. Gordon McCaw Calvin Klein, Wrangler WANTED: Part time office gp^ool area. 565-1393 over 200 othe^ brands. help. Gerleman Chlrop$7,900 to $19,500 includes ractlc Office, Safeway beginning inventory, airShopping Center, Hdn. NEED LOVING PERSON gg„ f^, j j^ faghlon Apply in person. No as Uve-ln sitter for my 2^ Center, training, fixtures, phone calls. young boys. 4 days wkly. Grand Opening Promi———-—-————-—""* board. $125 mo. ,io„s Q^^^ ^^ Loughlln DENTAL ASSIST, wanted ^'^^^ (612)835-1304. to work in a fast growing Dental office, exp. prefer' red, for info call Debbie ; ^^ THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR EXPERIENCE 293-5285. B.C. ^^^ WANTED REAL ESTATE ^^ W^m • • Vll PLHII% l%EHL I I LICENSEES apply at AnJ FIJ 833 Nevada Hwy., B.C. 293-2171 chor Realty, 414 Nev. • I l^l Hwy. or call 294-0080. B.C. M. |^. AFTER HOURS CALL: OPTOMETR^ Assistant | ^^ 5:S"lr!;n^?S:::;:::::::::;:;;z::5i;;S e"Srprrr7ed""c;i'l • ^ Crist.na Antonio 293-0116 564-7581 for interview. 1981 TOYOTA SR 5. Low mileage. $5500. 1968 OLDS CUTLASS, good flxup car. $350. 565-6632. MOTORCYCLE, Moto Gutzi 1973, Fresh motor, new tires, full dress, many extras, selling due to death. $2,000. Call 293-6997 after 5. B.C. 74 (ROADLINER) Motorhome. 20 ft. 33.500 original mi. Excellent cond. $6500. After 6 p.m. 565-1520. 1980 YAMAHA. 650 Special, extra chrome, exc. cond. 293-3992. B.C. 1978 JEEP, CJ7. Renegade V-8 hardtop, low mileage, loaded, no air. 293-5277. B.C. -72 FORD COURIER, newly re-built eng., new brakes & tires, $1200 or best offer. 293-7639. B.C. 27 FT. TRAVEL TRAILER, '72 Ken Craft, top quality. AC, Reese hitch, other extras, exc. cond. $5,000. 293-4736, BC. FOI^ SALE, 1969 Dune Buggy with top. Call after S p.m. 293-4431. B.C. HOMES LAND [BUSINESS SALES RENTALS PROPERTY IMANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY OVERLOOKING LAKE MEAD, custom 4 bedroom home on 2 lots, custom throughout, 2900 sq. ft. Price $230,000. 2 DUPLEXES in Boulder City, $79,900 & $87,900. Call t office for details. CHURCH 61 DAY CARE facilities. 6ver~dcre. $175,000. LOTS B-HI LC beautiful Vz acre lot $44,000. GEORGIA AVE.. near golf course $39,500. HENDERSON 3 BEDROOM, 1 bath w-swimming pool. Assumable 7>^% VA loan. Price reduced to $68,000. 2Vi ACRE CUSTOM home area Sec. 9. $32,000, 5 ACRE, near Las Vegas Downs, Sec. 16. $125,000. MLS Patty Guffrey 293-H07S Cheryl Ferrence 293-4158 Paul Ryan .„~.T..Tn7::Z:,..293-5406 Ray Arneson 293-2335 WANTED: PART-TIME dedicated Individual with sincere desire to advance. High School graduate in good physical shape (M or F). One weekend a month and two weeks in the summer. Good pay plus retirement, educational assistance and much more. Call 385-0301 Nevada Army National Guard. REALTY WORLD G. A. "Curly" Smith, Inc. 1610 Nevada Hwy. "The Dome" CALL ANYTIME 293-1613-CALL ANYTIME CALL US FOR*RESIDENTIALHAND'INYESTMENT PROPERTY — imjodk cmr—CAREFREE LIVING In this 1978 Fuqua, 24' x 40' mobile home on Its own 60' x 100' lot. Well landscaped. $65,000. MOUNTAIN VISTA Beautiful 24 x 54 Fleetwood, 2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home on a minimum care 60 X 100 lot. $69,950 LAKE MOUtTTAIN ESTATES Energy efficient, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath highly upgraded mobile home with 19S6 square feet of livable space. You must see to appreciate. $110,000 ESTABLISHED BUSINESS in down town Boulder City. HENDERSON CUTE LITTLE STARTER HOME. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. In an established neighborhood In Henderson. $51,950. SUPER STARTER $52,950. Imnacalate 3 bedroom, plush new carpets thruout. See this. VEGAS VALLEY VIEW Half acre custom 24 story, S bedroom, family room, play room, fireplacea-Owner will help finance with low down. $145,00>. BOULDER CITY MOBILE HOME SALES BRING YOUR TOOTH BRUSH!!! 10 x 55,1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished mobile home. Only $9,250. REDUCED REDUCED!! 14 x 60,2 bedroom, 2 bath. Well kept overlooks Eldorado Valley. 823,000. HENDERSON SACRIFICE PRICE $17,050 Very nice 2 bedroom, 20 X 52 Hlllcrest mobile home. Family section of Villa Hermosa. ADULT ONLY SECTION, VILLA HERMOSA Beautiful 2 bedroom, 2 bath Broadmore. 14 x 70. Only $24,550. LOTS 40 acres in Arizona Golden Horseshoe Ranchos $13,500, 4,6 acres • $385,000 Highway frontage!! UNRESTRICTED VIEW OF LAKE Only $66,950 Terms, Please call for details, APARTMENT LAND, In Las Vegas. Price includes plans for 17 units, $75,000, R-3 lot In Boulder City $129,500. CHARMING OLDER HOME in nice area. 3 bdrm., IH bath, carport, large laundry room with workbench. i Close to schools. Crood assumable loan. A great buy at $72,500. CAREFREE LIVING AT IT'S BEST in this completely redecorated 2 bdrm.. IVi bath townhouse. Beautiful fireplace, plush carpet, lovely custom drapes are Just a few of the extras. Good loan can be assumed. Priced at $72,500. JUST WHAT YOU'VE BEEN WAITING FOR .., 3 bdrm., 2 full baths, 2 car garage. Urge fenced yard with automatic sprinklers. Interior freshly painted. Located in quiet cul-d-sac. All for only $75,000. LAKETREE TOWNHOUSE, single story. 3 bdrm., 1% bath. Finished 2 car garage. Great location. $81,500. 1 COZY, COMFORTABLE, CONVENIENT, 3 bdrm., \\ I bath, fireplace, 2 car garage, all new appl., on corner lot near schools, owner licensee. $80,900. CUSTOM 4 bdrm., 1^ bath home located in quiet cul-d' sac. Fra. rm., den, fireplace, large fenced yard. Great family home with over 2300 sq. ft. $102,500. EXCLUSIVE Marina Highland Esutes new 3 bdrm 2 I bath custom home w-unobstructed view of Lake Mead. Open fioor plan w-beautiful fireplace in the liv, rm., I elegant interior decor. $160,000. JPANORAMIC VIEW OF LAKE IWEAD from this cusItom 3 bdrm., W bath. fm. rm. w-fireplace. large game Irm. w-wet bar. Located in one of the most prestigious |areas of Southern Nevada. $171,500. SPACIOUS TWO STORY ... 4 BDRM.. 24 bath, dbl garage, covered patio, large swimming pool. Good terms. $118,500, • GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME will mean more in this I lovely home. 3 bdrm.. IV4 baths, family rm. w-flreplace. I tS X 29 game rm.. 18 x 36 swimming poolfcspa, covered patio. Over 2400 sq. ft. and located only t blocks from I B.C. golf course. $119,500. ILIKE IT? GOLFERS WILL!! Located behind No. 2 tec |is this FHStom 3 bdrm., IH bath home with spectacular view, Guect house, workshop low maintenance yard Imake this an exceptional buy. $14I.S09. IGREAT LAKE MEAD VIEW ... from this custom 4 Ibdrm., 2^4 bath home w-spa in master suite. Two story • |w-open floor plan, large fm. rm., 2 plus car garage, lots of storage, central vac, intercom and much more. 1179,500. FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT DESIGNER HOME completely ftirnlshed 2 bedroom, 2% bath, family room. Cathedral ceiling. Mexican Rose Quartz floor to ceiling fireplace. Completely enclosed, surrounded by palm trees. Security alarm system. Heated swimming pool, RV parking. Call us to see this magnificent home $240,000. ROOM FOR THE FAMILY to grow in this beautiful custom home on a halfacre lot. Lots of space with 4' bdrms., 3 bath, family room, and large game room w-wel bar. Many extras i ncluding 3 fireplaces, one in master .suite which also includes jacuzii tub and balcony. 3 car garage, corrals, and block storage bidg. add to the value. $269,500. LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME? We have a number of excellent sites available. Price di terms are never going to be better than they are now. MOBILE HOMES-24 X 60 VILLA WEST in excellent condition. 2 bdrm IV4 bath, fro. rm.. central heat & air cond. Horizonal siding, composition roof Located in adult only Gingerwood Mobile Home Park. $46,500. 14 X 70SEOUA ...2 bdrm. VisU Estates on rented lot. 1^ bath. Located in Mtn. Call for deUils. $18,500. RETIREE'S DREAM ... 2 bdrm., 1 bath Mobile in excellent condition. Custom kitchen. 2.12 x 56 cabanas 30x 30 garage with W bath and all RV hookups. Maintenance free yard fully enclosed by block wall. Lot Is over \ acre and located in quiet cul-d-sac. This is a "must see". Call today. LARGE CORNER LOT ... very nicely landscaped. Circle driveway, block walls, automatic sprinklers. 2 bdrm.. I'l bath mobile home. 10 x 32 awning, 2 metal sheds. $48,590. .— GOLFER'S DELIGHT This two bdrin. mobile home ^ has a nine hole putting green in the front yard. Plenty of parking, storage, 14 fk-ult trees, and many extras. .168,500 includes lot. 1977 BROADMORE MOBILE HOME IN Mt. VisU Estates, .^pprox. 1000 sq. ft.. 2 bdrm.. 2 bath, desert landscaping. Low utilities and lots of RV parking. Verv j attractive and clean. $64,000. TOLL FREE!! 1-800-545-0902, Ext. E4 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTY. mmt • MM

PAGE 41

1W Pagf 40 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday, May 20,1982 VMli 'ti^Itl'iMii*KUnilei's, NEED HELP? cll Rowlands, The HaBdynuB SS4-306S REMODELS-ADDinONS NEW STRITTI'RES. RESIDENTIAL commercial. Lie. No. 194S7 Skyline BIdg Co. ZSS-OOOS or 381-3814. B.C. SAND. GRAVEL, TOP SOIL LANDSCAPE ROCK. Call tSS-tUS. B.C. CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATIONS KItcheos, Batiit, Floor* ne EstimatM LIcenicd. Bonded 293-7818 j PEST SHIELD Fantastic Ultra sonic sound insect repellent. Pests & insects leave forever. Maneyback guarantee. 199 95 per unit. Covers ISOO sq ft. 3 yr. warranty. S8S-9395. WALLPAPERING & PAINTING Interior A Exterior decorating Information, professional results guaranteed. Call Laureen for free estimate. Reasonable rates l.j y^Med 293-7581. B.C. Jeep Parts Available D0N7 JUNK m The Bfigine can be rebuit cheaper then replacing the car. SCOWS Kesterson Ranch 3 m HWY. 95 Specialist in Jeep I Rebuilding So. of RR Pass on CERAMIC • Masonry Concrete additions. Remodeling. Free Esti mates. 451-1225 eves. SEWING, ALTERATIONS, MENDING done at reasonable rates. Exp. 293-7081, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. B.C. CARPENTRY rooflng patio covers convert garages, Boulder City resident, free estimate*, ref.,' 293-7579. B.C. RELIABLE exchange student desires work, will do any odd Jobs, call 293 4937 ask for Cesar. B C. 56S-S3nr M1-U7 WALLPAPERING Excellent references Custom Work {Painting Exterior &I (Interior Free Estimates| Call Joe 293-1662. RESPONSIBLE YOUNG MAN will do lawn mowing. 293-3863 or 293-3578. B.C. \.\ CUSTOM LAWN SERVICE Mow, clean up, vacuum fertilixe, edge, trim rototil, renovate. Hdn. • B.C. FREE ESTIMATE 293-4556 LET A VETERAN do It for you. Yard work & cleanup work, painting & whatever. Call Tony, 564 1159. HOUSE SITTING, your bouse will be safe in my care while you're on vacation this summer. Excellent ref. Rates avail, for all summer, monthly or weekly. Call Caria at 293-3269 after 5 p.m., Non. Thurs B.C. CONCRETE Guaranteed: Profes-I slonal work at lowl Iprices. Free Estimates.[ Tall Residential Artists| St. Cont. No. 17676. Lou Caputo 293-6816 B.C. • REMODEL Large or small concrete work. Patio It room additions. Call Ray. 565-7534. MURRAY MAINT. SERVICE General repair & handyman. Carpentry, painting, glass, coolers etc. 293-5110 *fe*MMitt**kiMHMM CONCRETE WORK Block Work Cooldecking. Driveways, patios, floors, cooldeck additions, patio walls, stone, brick, etc. 20 yrs. exp Quality work. Ph. 564 2339 AIR CONDITIONERS fepolred dr serviced at recession prices. 565-9203. A-Z Vacuum and Sewing Center 331 8. Water St. Henderson. 565-7170 LITTLE DEALER LITTLE PRICES BUDD APPLIANCE SERVICE Quality Repair Worlt Guaranteed (702) 293-6564 or 293-4556 We repair most brands — 20 Years Experience •Dryers •Freeiers BOULDER REALTY 293-3232 4I(> Npvada Highway Boulder ( ity, Nv. •Compactors •Hot Water Heaters •Washers •Refi-igerators •Dishwashers •Garbage Disposals s-^afi^,-^ ID .SPRINKLER SYSTEMS INSTALLED. Lawns mowed, yds. cleaned, trash hauled. Most anything. 564-3065 or 565-1887. AARON FENCING Frot Estimotos Chain link A Wood Fencing 30 Years Exp. Ph 451 8)90 GENERAL CONTRACTOR ALL PHASES OF CAR PENTRY WORK RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Lie. No. 14492 293^284 B.C BONANZA READYMOC I CONCRETI' PRODUCTS 564-7372 564-7371 DELIVERY M0N.-8AT. HANDY MAN I Harlow's material and repair service. Most repair* 1 around your home. Ans. service Ph. 293-3911 or 293-6172 THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICK-UP, •49-2374-5-6. Call Charlotte 870-9171 or 293-3128. HANDYMAN BEN DEPUE, "Henderson'* Licensed Handyman" will help you with remodeling or fixup Carpentry, plumbing, electrical, cement, fireplaces, painting, stucco, patio covers. Ph. 565-7468. LAWNMOWING & TRIMMING, res., reliable teenage boys. Call Garth SchuU, 293-4585 B.C. fig@S4^ ^fMumz SERVICE 940 JlVI.BM80tJl8t cm* NV. Factory authorized warranty service HOME AUTO REPAIR, AND SERVICE. All repairs, all motor work, transmission repair, tune-ups, brake Jobs, all boat repair. No Job too big. Free estimates. RV repair. 3S4-0398. BACKHOE, LOADER, DUMP TRUCK All for $30 per hr. 293-2115. B.C ^^m^ ^^s Help IS here. \OUC;ANNOW QUAUi V&iUJY' w>th tlu.".,e.seller ,'.;,r-.!'j1.buy dov/n rNMA.ind(-lher S(;!ect proqranv. odprrd hrrf> PRE-WIRE Wc^t^tx TELEPHONt • CUSTOM HOMES • TRACT HOMES • C0ND08-APTS. MOBILE HOMES Tele •SALES • INSTALLATION SERVICE Co. Inc. Ut us fce your phone doctor We • >ki' ""• Sttte lie. 19230 B.C. Lie. 2728. Phone (70?) 293-7239. IS.? W I.AkKMKAl) l)R!VK HKNDKRSON. NKVADA PHONK 56,S8*47 ?f5^ Rosecrest Gibinets^bic HENDERSON. NEVADA Cwtoii Kitditiit \ 565-7472 ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR A & M Electric Inc. InstallaUon li Repair* 1733 Boulder Hwy Henderson Nevada Lie 7292-A 564-5311 laamaa i iiinnr i n i t'iotfla : FIX-IT-SHOP ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Electrical wiring, new con*truction, remodel*, additions, extra circuits and repair. Licenae No. 016276. Insured Bonded. Phone 293-6372 w0m^ ^* W **<** M M t MM M > M > M r* i (i I Kl I mC ^OMl^ DECORATING SXRVIOILI. rcLLtll 9 "V„,| ciinX get a belter Feller"" • AJIWNCTTLEAMNGDECOjtttTNt:? • QUAUTY WORKMANSHIP / GUARANTEED WAGES ONLY ffirrsRioB A RONALD FEL£EK EXTKiioi ••^Wn V M ** M ***i**>—*W>* WE XL GIVE YOU THE PROFESSIONAL ADVICE YOU NEED ABSOLUTELY NO OBLIGATIONiWE TAKE TRADE-INS AND BUY EQUITIESt! MOTIVATED SELLER • Architect designed and built this 2.000 square foot beauty for his family located on half acre horse loned lot. Totally unique In design and execution. It offers a separaU master suite with huge cedar lined closet. Great owner carried terms ease your move up to quality. Call 56M947 or eves. 564-3208. OWNER ANXIOUS lost his Job and must sell to Uke out-of-sUte position. Just completed this 1580 foot custom home with 3 huge bedrooms and deucbed two car garage on fenced 97 x 150 foot lot. Asking $74,500 but will consider ALL offers'. Call 565-8947 or eves. 564-3208. A PIECE OF HEAVEN Couldn't be lovller than the leafy glade In which this Urge 4 bedroom, 2 bath home resides. Huge shade trees and mature lawns* shrubs provide an enviable environment for the kids to olav In the pool, while over 1700 feet of open floor plan welcome you In only $70,000. Call 565-8947 or eves. 564-3208. PERCHED HIGH ON A CORNER Newer tract location with block • walled back yard, lovely decorating, family room, alarm system and something even better ~ a low Interest VA loan you can Uke over. Call 565-8947 or eves. 564-3208. YOU DONT NEED MONEY! Have Investor with several newer three bedroom tract homes Interested 'In trading for Vanwagenen Townhouses or? on exchange basis lets trade! Call 565-8947 or eve*. 564-3208. CITY VIEW TERRACE only one left! New three bedroom, two bath,dlshwasher, range, oven, drapes T-0 plus a garage. Our most popular model priced at $58 950 with buy down interest can be financed IFHA or VA. Call 565-8947 or eve*. 565-9453. CANT QUALIFY? no worrying you can Uke over this loan with no qualifying A new three bedroom, two baths with landscaping and sprlnker*. Under priced at $67,000 Call 565-8947 or eves. 565-9453 fo' more Information. tSELF LANDSCAPING miiai' White Rock Special 9< tq. ft 9* Colored Rock Landscape Sand Railroad Ties Sand & Gravel It'll Gro Top Soil Stepping Stones ^ U PICK UP OR WE DELIVER (Reduced Delivery Rates to B.C.) 1934 Parkson (off Sunset) Belwnn Boulder Hwy. A GibtM lU LANDSCAPE SUPP LY, INC. CALL FOR! FREE ESTlMAn Hours 7-5 Henderson, Nev 564-7645 J & F S( KAP MKTAI. .112 W Knsler M lleiMlerson. Nevada 54 2*1.1 AIAJMINIJM CANS 25' LB. %UICK /#0 TV&AFPUANCERENTAL SILLMEftftELLS 'U8( Appliance WATER ST. HENDERSON 5^5-8798 k BETTEirWA Y OF LI VING King sized comfort In thl* spacious 3 bedroom home In established area. Close to schools, pool, and all summer recreation. Cozy wood burning fireplace. Large garage with plenty of workspace. This is a value packed home you should not miss seeing. 886,900. OWN THE WORLD This exciting, contemporary home has an unlimited 360 degree view. Relax in the spa tub then dry off by the fireplace in mstr. bdrm. Located on over ^* acre private! THE POSSIBLE DREAM Lovely two story home featuring 4 bdrms., 2H baths on Boulder City Golf Course. Covered patio for summertime relaxation, large used brick fireplace in famllyroom, formal living and dining areas. Excellent financing now available. Call today, 8135,000. CONDOS or TOWNHOIWES for Investment or for maintenance tret living. We have a variety of floorplans and price ranges to please your pocket book as well as tantllize your needs for luxurious, carefree living. Call for further Info. LAND MILLION DOLLAR VIEW Property available overlooking Lake Mead or perhaps you prefer the colorful desert mountain ranges. We have several to choose from. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY COMPLETE AND READY TO GO. Artfully and tastefully decorated for relaxed dining In this centrally located restaurant. All the finest In fixtures and equipment. Business growing everyday. Excellent opportunity to become financially Independent. Call for appointment and details. NEW. CLEAN, & SENSIBLY PRICED 2 bdrm. rental. Never been lived in. Located in central Boulder City. 8450 per month. Call today for viewing. PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AVAILABLE INQUIRE AT BOULDER REAL'^Y SALES ASSOCIATES June Hansen, Broker 293-4223 JaneGrider 293-5949 Janice Crawford 293-2275 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY 293-3232 IN THE HEART OF CLEAN GREEN BOULDER I 5,^ SUN REALTY Inc. "THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS" 1311 Nevada Hwy., Bouldw City, Nevada 89005 24 HOURS 293-2151 WE HAVE MANY OTHER LISTINGS ... CALL AND LET US KNOW YOUR NEEDS TODAY!!! FABULOUS FEATURES! Custom living with magnificent wood and tile throughout. Spacious 1880 sq. ft. includes sewing room. Marina Highlands. 8134,900. SMILE IN STYLE! Delightful 4 bdrm. In Vllle Del Prado. Beautiful family room sports fireplace and wetbar. Terrific assumption. Price Reduction! Only $108,000. LUSCIOUS LUXURY! Dreamy relaxing In your own private spa & sauna In master bedroom. Panoramic view. 3 bdrm., 2V^ bath. Custom, quality, comfort. Only 8175,000. COUNTRY LIVING Enjoy this 2 bdrm.. 1 bath Searchlight home near Cottonwood Cove & Lake. Fishing, Swimming. Sunning! Reduced $10,000 for quick sale. Only $32,900 & owner will carry some paper. COZY AND CUTE. 2 bdrm., 1 bath on comer lot. Clean. tn*h. Inviting. New steel siding, manicured lawn. A steal at $55,000. INVESTMENT SPECIAL. Price reduced. Duplex In excellent ara. Close convenient. Call for dcUlU! CLASSY C .iTOM LIVING. Exquisite features. Gorgeous view ,0 proposed B.C. 2nd 9-hole golf course. Fireplace iL sunken living room. Plus! Pool. Spa, Patios, heated & cooled handlman's garage. See to believe! EARTHLY PARADISE. Heavenly decoration abounds In this 3 bdrm., 1 bath home. Magnificent kitchen. Convenient location. Only $72,500. COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE characterize this lovely 4 bdrm., 2 bath home in Lewis subdivision. Picnic In your gorgeous yard all summer long. Take over 8S% VA loan Just 894,750. BEAT THE HEAT! In this gorgeous 3 bedroom home with a lovely pool to wile away the hot summer hours. Winter will delight you In the large family room with floor to ceiling fireplace! Don't miss this! Just $94,500. SUPER SWEETHEART. 2 bdrm., 2 bath with den in a great neighborhoodrFabulous assumption. Hurry before this one goes at only $66,000. DOLL HOUSE 3 bdrm.. IS bath. Only $74,960 with $17,500 down. Buyer can a**unic an FHA loan of $57,000 at ll.S<^ with payment* of $511 per month. Call for deUlls. MODERN MAGNIFICENCE. Enjoy a view of Lake Mead'* blue waters from living room of this spacious Executive home. 2300 plus sq. ft! Terrific terms. Only $137,500! SUPER NICE! Decorated In earth tosie*. Lush decorated landscaping. 3 bedroom, 1% bath home. Adjacent to custom home area. $1I8,S00. WE HAVE BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES F0R8ALE Call us fiar deUlls. .. CONDOMINIUMS CHIC AND CHARMING Is this super condo with lovely decoration throughout. Enjoy your own private yard And only $71,500. BOULDER SQUARE, LA DOLCE VITA & LAKE TER RACE CONDOMINIUMS. Call us for more details and price range. MOBILE HOMES MODERN CUSTOM. In lovely B.C. Park's adult section you'll find this clean and fresh mobile home, with extra extras! Come and see! Only $54,950. LOVELY FAMILY MOBILE HOME In Mt. VlsU Park All fenced In with pretty fruit and shade trees. Clean and neat 2 bdrm., 2 bath featuring covqred patio, stor age and parking. Only $54,000! HENDERSON LAS VEGAS CLEAN MODERN CONDO. Don't miss this sharp 2 bdrm. condo. Enjoy convenient extras like kitchen pan try and auto garage door opener. Owner ready to sell! Only $57,500. LAND SPECTACULAR VIEW! EnJoy life's pleasures. Dis cover this fabulous lot on the lake. Good terms avalla ble. Call today! $57,500. TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE! That's right! Two Sub 11 lots $28,500. Call for all the deUlls. "B" HILL AWAITS YOU ... Two lots reduced to sell on San Felipe ... $20,000 and $25,000. Owner will consldei trade for equity in B.C. home or a boat. GORGEOUS LAKE VIEW A lot that comes with plans Owner will consider trade for equity in home. Only $39400! FABULOUS TERMS! Don't mis* thii xlent city building lot. 70 X100 In e*tabllshed neighborhood. You'll be glad you found this one. BRANCHING INTO RANCHING mightjustbefbryou! Private country living on this heavenly 2.25 acre ranch estate lot with xlent term*. Sound appealing? It is! Only $125,000. PRIME COMMERCIAL ... 4.63 acre*. GREAT TERMS on Lake View lot. Sac. Price only $31,500. Located on Cul-DeLAS VEGAS AREA: 13.38 acres. Warm Springs Road, and 2.27 acres on Happy Lane ... Super terms. RISIDENTUL ACREAGE INVESTMENT COMMERCIAL MQUME AIOUT TNf TKOR HOMI PROnCTKNI PUN M^ii':"" f Thursday, May 20,1982 m GARAGE MOVING SALE, ???????' 665 Otono, Sat,, May 22, 8 ????????? a.mto?B.C. ??????? ??????? • GARAGE SALE It CRAFT BALE: Bikes, chlldrens clothes, hou*eh9ld Items, much nice misc. Frl, not before 9:30 Ul 4. Sat, 8 to 2. 884 Jerl Lane, B,C. .'^?"5" GARAGE SALE: sat. I !!!11!:L_____ "'" Sun^ May 22* 23, 9 to 5, CARAGE SALE, Sat., May 1827 Muchacha Dr., 22 in > m tn 2 n m .Stnvr 7??7??>7??????????????????? If you're driven about YARD good economy, here's a quick quiz about cars that may help. 1827 Muchacha Green Valley Park. SALE, Sat,, May 22nd from 8 a,m. to noon, 115 Hickory, Hdn. 1. Last year how many diesel cars were sold in the United States? (a) .'S.OOO (b) .^0,000 (c) more than 500,000 ^2. Some diesel half-ton pick-up trucks have a range between fill ups of (a) 840 miles (b) 540 miles (c) 340 YARD SALE: 206 Zinc. Sat. miles? all day. 3. Japan's first diesel powered passenger ear was GARAGE SALE: Sat., May SUPER YARD SALE: U-name-it, we-got-it. Corner of Arthur & Carson Way, Hlllcrest Subdivision. Sat. 8 til ?? YARD SALE: Fri., May 21. 3 baby beds from $25 to $50,1 small Oak baby bed, tots of baby clothing. New & used. From 25 cents to $5. Summer Is cornel ng • we also have large & small fans, and coolers. Lot more things so come see. 121 Maple, Hdn., Nev, GARAGE SALE, Sat., May 22,10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stove, 10 sp. bike, tables, books 6t baby Items, 847 Montera Ln., B.C. YARD SALE, clothes, misc., moving, 701 Elm. Sp. 98, Sat, 8 a.m. to 12 noon. B.C. YARD SALE:'May 22,8 a.m. Remodeling sale. Dishes, clothes, bedspreads, pictures & misc. Everything priced to sell. 311 lln St. C^ll 564-5353. produced in (a) 1951 (b) )961 (c) 1971? (q) K 'J3|ep nzns| ue ie uoneiujoj •ui ajoiu ia8 OS|B UBO no^ 'siasdip )noqE djoiu sjapeaj s\\a'\ qaiqM isaSiQ s.japeayl Ae|\ ai)i u! pE ue se\\\ /iuvdxuoo iBi(x nznsi 'sias' -aip JO jaifeiu auo jaquinu s.uedep Xq apeui s, 11 sdn Iljj uaaM'iaq sa|iiu ofrS • '*'^" siajj dn->|3id pasBq-8uoi e 'lasaip auo () S Ajiunoo siqt Ul pjos aiBiA SJBD las -!P 88i'02S pjooaa K is6l UJ (0) 1 ;SaaMSNV < ^ PETS I 22. 9 to 3. Sewing machine, clothing, bedspread, collectables Including Disney & castiron toys. Other misc. items. 618 Fernbrook Dr., Highland Hills, Hdn. MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE. Sat. 9 to 4. Magic Chef dbl oven. Porta Potty, camp stove, pool pump, mini bike, humldiner, clothes, toys, much more. 235 Fullerton. YARD SALE: 641 Paloma Dr., Boulder City. Lots of goodies. Bed, loveseat, couch, clothes, many other Items. Sat. & Sun. from 8 to ?? HANDS TIED FOR LACK OF CASH? INSTANT CASH 1st., 2nd., 3rd. ..lOHTGAGES. TRl ST DEEDS Credit Problems' Real Estate Problems'' l.ocalionO'roblems'' Trust deetNtrobiems" Family Problems? WE RESOLVE Reasonable Rates It Interest Ask your neitlhbor he knows u> KOZAL'S 736-7006 or 870-6456 TWO FREE PUPPIES, Cocker Spaniel mix. 565-1121. ST. BERNARD, needs good home w-room to run, 1 yr. old, male. Best offer. Call 293-1793 Tues. thru Fri. after 3 p.m., ask for LeAnn. B.C. FOR SALE: Red, black & tan Dobermans. Male & female. Call after 6, 564-7126, Purebred Bay Gelding, '79 Thorbeau X AM Indraffa; solid color, quick learner ready for serious work. Purebred Chest. Filly, '80, Storml Bey X CG ThorHannah; stra, strip, snip, hind socks. DBL reg, '/i Arab-Pinto mare m '76 Gay Prince X Sweeta. Proven producer, halter ribbons. Not ridden recently, very affectionate. Current shots and worming. Phone 645-1464. GARAGE SALE: 3 family. Nice children's clothing, lots of misc. 8 to noon. Sat. 22nd. 430 Chateau. YARD SALE, 635 UUh St., Frl. 5-21, 8 a.m. til ? Sat. 5-22, 8-10 a.m. Bike, antique grinder, etc. YARD SALE: 5-22,7 a.m. no presale, bathtub, furn. & misc. 409 Ave. B, B.C. HUGE GARAGE SALE, furn., bicycles & odds & ends. 650 Del Prado, 8-5 Sat. 5-22. YARD SALE: Construction tools & equipment. Camper shell, telephone recorder, B-W TV, 8 lug wheel & tires. Lowboy trailer. Video recorder, household items. Sat. & Sun. Corner of Ash & Lake Mead Dr. SEWING MACHINE &I ifACUUM CLEANERl SALES & SERVICE. arensens. 509 Ave. C. 293-3770, B.C. VOICE, PIANO LESSONS. Vocal specialist. All ages, Raye's Home Studio of Musical Arts. Ph. Flo Raymond, 565-8469. Plan now for fall lessons. • DATA PROCESSING • • ivtlUkls • • INerd PrscifilstIPtyroU • • I Bsstrtl Lt4tr I Invoicing • • I Killing Lilt I Inyintory • • 964-7419or iMofsitlofl* YARD SALE: Sat, May 22,9 to 5. Clothes. Infant to adult sizes, books, dishes, drapes, misc. 1208 Colt Dr. (off Magic Way). WHITE BABY RABBITS FOR SALE. 565-8423. GARAGE SALE: Fri. & Sat. Baby items, clothes, lots of misc. 9 to 4. 729 GreenFREE: 4 Hens. Rhode Isway Rd land Reds. 564-7653. •—ZZZZZZZZZZZ BRANIFF EMPLOYEE FTEE: TO good home Poo^D. SALE. Old Avon hotdie. male^pricot color. ''^^^ -^ i.L. 11^' Verv eood watchdoB & children's items, books, i^d' w chiidrVn S'y? ':r\v.l"rr?oZ>t old. Call between 9:30 ^.'^''".f•,?'• l* "ew ..m.&12:30p.m.564-2830. Jems,^^ 'If, J-„%^ ^^ Glenwood Lane. 565-6109. MUSIC LESSONS IN YOUR HOME Piano. Organ, Guitar Banjo, Mandolin, Volce.1 College accredited teacher. Paula Busch. 564-2382 or 564-3717 a.m. PSYCHIC (for those seeking the Truth), 4567258. EXPERftNCED BOOKKEEPER will do bookkeeping for small business In Hdn. In my home. Will pick up & deliver. 564-3495. Typing'""EMI By Andrea Letters, resumes, term papers, documents, statistical, manuscripts, etc. Editing, Guaranteed professional, reasonable, 293-4665 293-4078 MOVING SALE, color TV, radios, dishes, linens, costume Jewelry, ladies shoes & clothing, Ig. sizes, — 2 dressers, desk as is, misc. household goods etc. Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m. til noon, 800 Ave, A, B,C, JUDI'S STENOGRAPHIC SERVtCE" Professional Stenographer Statistical Reporis-Manuscrlpts-Contracts-Graphs egal Documents-Rough Copy-Letters-Transcriptionl YOU NAME IT-I CAN TYPE IT '293-6605 Omce 293-2515-After 6 p.m. & Weekend* GARAGE SALE, Sat,, May 22.8:30 a,m, to 4 p.m. Baby Items, canning jars, books, games, houseplants & much more. 1217 Ave. G, B.C. •" rrrrrffrimnjjujj BOULDER ELECTRIC Licensed, bonded, insured. Lie. No. 15187. Call 293-4899. M W l M WM a***WH< M > M S^ SHORT ORDER COOK dc WAITRESS, call 2933301 for Interview. B.C. WANTED reliable, mature person to cook and serve food 5 days, Tues. thru Sat so Snack Drug. RELIEF care institution, Thurs, Frl., Sat., St. Judes Ranch for children 293-3131, B.C, REAL ESTATE LICENSEE'S needed. Up to 80% commission. Call Roberts Realty 565-8947. DISTRIBUTOR WANTED: To handle name brand beauty products in the Hdn., B.C. area. Call 878-4525. Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 41 FOUND, box of tools, Henderson area, call and .identify tools, and when lost, 5(5-9817, recorder phone. B.C. LOST, Sit. afternoon, green pet bird, vicinity of 600 block of Ave. B., does not ny. 293-6116. evet. B.C. DIVERSIFY YOUR INCOME. We're expanding rapidly. Looking for success oriented snd ambitious Individual who want to grow with us. If you are serlou* call Success Builders International for app't. Absolutely no telephone interview. 56S-1997. \ BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES' RETIRED or semi-retired local man looking for part-time light maintenance work. Must be established local resident, sober and dependable, (Maintenance exp. & references preferred). For details contact Mr. Ziegler at Railroad Pass Casino, Men. A Thurs. 8 a.m. to 10 M.m. ONLY. BUSPERSON dc cooking positions open. Health card required. Apply in person between 2 di 4. Slzzler Steak House, 110 N. Boulder Hwy., Henderson. REGISTERED NU^SE: Perform* physical exams, assists physician, help to plan, coordinate di implement the program. Requires considerable discretionary Judgment: ability to relate to minority dt low income clientele. Must have current Nev, RN LICENSE, and 2 yrs. experience. Salary range, $12,427 $17,007. Applications accepted until 4 p.m. Monday, May 17, 1982 at ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY BOARD OF CLARK COUNTY, 2228 Comstock Dr., Las Vegas, Nev. 89030, Hairitage Styling Parlor 10U Atlantic Apply In person. Thurs.. Fri orKat. HELP WANTED; RcsUurant Cashier data terminal. Relief shift. Railroad Pass Casino. WANTED: Housekeeper to watch 3 yr. old for summer. Call before 10 or after 7, 565-9323 or 564-7643. VEHICLES ] WANTED: Babysitter 2 days a wk. Mon. di Frl. Mature woman preferred. 293-5006. ^ • WILLING TO GIVE" • TLC TO YOUR CHIL-tf • DREN while you work.^ 'Odd hours Is my spe-# [cialty. Call nowj 564-5108. \ LICENSED CHILD CARE. Snack &,hot lunch. Infants ft up. 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Please call 5044770. JOB INFO: Cruise Ship Jobs. Also Houston. Dallas, Overseas Jobs. 602-99li-6426, Dept, 0410, Ph. call refund. $106.80 DAILY EARNINGS working lto3hrs.a day at home. Your earnings fully guaranteed In writing. For complete details & application, please send a stam|ed self addressed envelope. FJG, 216 Palo Verde, Nogales. AZ. 85621. IF YOU ARE TIRED OF A HUMDRUM EXISTANCE and want something more out of life, call SFCVAUGHT at 385-0301 today. The Nevada Army National Guard can offer positions In Armor, Law Enforcement, Mechanics, Communications, Photo Journalism. To qualify for these fields you must be a HS Grid, good physical shape, and have a sincere desire to advance. If you're sincere, check uS out... you'll be pleasantly surprised. Sales People Route People Business People Call (800) 227-9970 1980 TOYOTA COROLLA. Automatic, 4 dr., PS & PB, air. 31,000 mi. $4800. 564-5912. FOR SALE: 30* 1978 Mobile Scout. Rally Master model. $11,000 firm. 565-6949. 1977 DODGE MAXI-VAN. $5500. AM/FM radio, CB, AC, dbl. bed, sink, stove, ref., thermal heat, fully insulated. Dual battery. Exc. cond. 731-1556. and after 4, 565-8252. 1981 SUZUKI TS 250. Almost new. Less than 1200 mi. $1175. 451-1723. 1970 INTERNATIONAL TRAVELALL. clean, air, hitch, $1400. 293-3508, ;B.C. pi^lSSrai^ntM condition, 30,000 miles. Auto, air, cruise control, power steering. $1,000 plus takeover payments or best offer. Call 798-78S2. Ask for OLDER MODEL JEt:^ PARTS 2-4 cyl. F heads, complete. Call Lois' 564-1B81, DRIVER S LICENSE TESTS Tuesday and Wednesday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m City Annex, Civic Center 200 Water Street Room 22A. Henderson 75 AMF CRESTLINER. 20'. 188 Mercury cruiaer. Stereo. CB. Tandem axel trailer. Full cover $6M0. Ph. after 6 p.m. 55-1480. 78 CAD. Fully loaded plus CB. Eldorado Brltz. 18.000 mi. $10,000.565-1480 after 6 p.m. CHEV. MOTORS REBUILT dt USED, transmissions rebuilt & used. All makes di models. Guaranteed. All boat repair dc parts Si service. RV repair. Call 384-0398. HYDE ASSOCIATES IICENSID REAL ESTATE IROKER 1028 WYOMING STREET BOULDEK CITY. NEVADA 89005 Pi 293-6014 Eves. 293-2144 MLS 647-1890. An Affirmative HENDERSON LICENSED fmnlnv'.?"" "P"*"'"*"""'' DAY CARE: TLCI Infants To receive a pacltage to employe^-. ^^^ ^ ^^^ ^^ lunches & determine if you should r ^ ~Z^ snacks. After schoolers consider a business of WE'RE LOOKING FOR welcome 564-3849 your own witJi a repeat AMBITIOUS PEOPLE. necessity product in a No door to door selling. lucrative "energy savAmway-it's a better way LICENSED NURSERY ingjlighting field, of life. 565-7476. CARE FOR UNDER TWO working wUh Indus — -YRS. OLD. In a home like jrial, commercial, inLADIES, House of Lloyd, C Ca''re*2M-7?7VB c" ^tit"'i<>nal ^nd govthe nations No. 1 toy gift _1^„„_____ ernmental accounts party program hiring 1_~~~~_~_1 We are a ten year old SreaSUPERVISER,man^ILL SUPERVISE 1 "fn^afe ^w oPe" age toy demonstrators school age child this fna in^hic area Eaual June Dec. free training summer, nice home, pool. onnirtunitv emoiover & supplies, no investref. 293-0173. B.C. opportunity employer ment. Call Kathy .r.T,~J^,n~^1iT,~. 642-1496 BC Z—Z ^^^ YOUR OWN Jean '— RELIABLE BABYSITSportswear or Infant HELP WANTED: Exper. TING in my home. AnyPreteen •' • ^'* Apwaitress, able to speak time. Hdn. Trailer EsP*"' -•'ij:*" ciiVvlr' Spanish, over 21 must tales area. Call Debbie, „J"J;,T.,r „ 3 know mexican food. Call 564-5925. STORE). Offering all Nain person. 1101 Ariiona tionslly Known Brands St El Patio. B.C. s"*^"" • • Jordache, Chic, WILL BABYSIT In my Lee, LevI, Vanderbilt, • -home. Gordon McCaw Calvin Klein, Wrangler WANTED: Part time office gp^ool area. 565-1393 over 200 othe^ brands. help. Gerleman Chlrop$7,900 to $19,500 includes ractlc Office, Safeway beginning inventory, airShopping Center, Hdn. NEED LOVING PERSON gg„ f^, j j^ faghlon Apply in person. No as Uve-ln sitter for my 2^ Center, training, fixtures, phone calls. young boys. 4 days wkly. Grand Opening Promi———-—-————-—""* board. $125 mo. ,io„s Q^^^ ^^ Loughlln DENTAL ASSIST, wanted ^'^^^ (612)835-1304. to work in a fast growing Dental office, exp. prefer' red, for info call Debbie ; ^^ THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR EXPERIENCE 293-5285. B.C. ^^^ WANTED REAL ESTATE ^^ W^m • • Vll PLHII% l%EHL I I LICENSEES apply at AnJ FIJ 833 Nevada Hwy., B.C. 293-2171 chor Realty, 414 Nev. • I l^l Hwy. or call 294-0080. B.C. M. |^. AFTER HOURS CALL: OPTOMETR^ Assistant | ^^ 5:S"lr!;n^?S:::;:::::::::;:;;z::5i;;S e"Srprrr7ed""c;i'l • ^ Crist.na Antonio 293-0116 564-7581 for interview. 1981 TOYOTA SR 5. Low mileage. $5500. 1968 OLDS CUTLASS, good flxup car. $350. 565-6632. MOTORCYCLE, Moto Gutzi 1973, Fresh motor, new tires, full dress, many extras, selling due to death. $2,000. Call 293-6997 after 5. B.C. 74 (ROADLINER) Motorhome. 20 ft. 33.500 original mi. Excellent cond. $6500. After 6 p.m. 565-1520. 1980 YAMAHA. 650 Special, extra chrome, exc. cond. 293-3992. B.C. 1978 JEEP, CJ7. Renegade V-8 hardtop, low mileage, loaded, no air. 293-5277. B.C. -72 FORD COURIER, newly re-built eng., new brakes & tires, $1200 or best offer. 293-7639. B.C. 27 FT. TRAVEL TRAILER, '72 Ken Craft, top quality. AC, Reese hitch, other extras, exc. cond. $5,000. 293-4736, BC. FOI^ SALE, 1969 Dune Buggy with top. Call after S p.m. 293-4431. B.C. HOMES LAND [BUSINESS SALES RENTALS PROPERTY IMANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY OVERLOOKING LAKE MEAD, custom 4 bedroom home on 2 lots, custom throughout, 2900 sq. ft. Price $230,000. 2 DUPLEXES in Boulder City, $79,900 & $87,900. Call t office for details. CHURCH 61 DAY CARE facilities. 6ver~dcre. $175,000. LOTS B-HI LC beautiful Vz acre lot $44,000. GEORGIA AVE.. near golf course $39,500. HENDERSON 3 BEDROOM, 1 bath w-swimming pool. Assumable 7>^% VA loan. Price reduced to $68,000. 2Vi ACRE CUSTOM home area Sec. 9. $32,000, 5 ACRE, near Las Vegas Downs, Sec. 16. $125,000. MLS Patty Guffrey 293-H07S Cheryl Ferrence 293-4158 Paul Ryan .„~.T..Tn7::Z:,..293-5406 Ray Arneson 293-2335 WANTED: PART-TIME dedicated Individual with sincere desire to advance. High School graduate in good physical shape (M or F). One weekend a month and two weeks in the summer. Good pay plus retirement, educational assistance and much more. Call 385-0301 Nevada Army National Guard. REALTY WORLD G. A. "Curly" Smith, Inc. 1610 Nevada Hwy. "The Dome" CALL ANYTIME 293-1613-CALL ANYTIME CALL US FOR*RESIDENTIALHAND'INYESTMENT PROPERTY — imjodk cmr—CAREFREE LIVING In this 1978 Fuqua, 24' x 40' mobile home on Its own 60' x 100' lot. Well landscaped. $65,000. MOUNTAIN VISTA Beautiful 24 x 54 Fleetwood, 2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home on a minimum care 60 X 100 lot. $69,950 LAKE MOUtTTAIN ESTATES Energy efficient, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath highly upgraded mobile home with 19S6 square feet of livable space. You must see to appreciate. $110,000 ESTABLISHED BUSINESS in down town Boulder City. HENDERSON CUTE LITTLE STARTER HOME. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. In an established neighborhood In Henderson. $51,950. SUPER STARTER $52,950. Imnacalate 3 bedroom, plush new carpets thruout. See this. VEGAS VALLEY VIEW Half acre custom 24 story, S bedroom, family room, play room, fireplacea-Owner will help finance with low down. $145,00>. BOULDER CITY MOBILE HOME SALES BRING YOUR TOOTH BRUSH!!! 10 x 55,1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished mobile home. Only $9,250. REDUCED REDUCED!! 14 x 60,2 bedroom, 2 bath. Well kept overlooks Eldorado Valley. 823,000. HENDERSON SACRIFICE PRICE $17,050 Very nice 2 bedroom, 20 X 52 Hlllcrest mobile home. Family section of Villa Hermosa. ADULT ONLY SECTION, VILLA HERMOSA Beautiful 2 bedroom, 2 bath Broadmore. 14 x 70. Only $24,550. LOTS 40 acres in Arizona Golden Horseshoe Ranchos $13,500, 4,6 acres • $385,000 Highway frontage!! UNRESTRICTED VIEW OF LAKE Only $66,950 Terms, Please call for details, APARTMENT LAND, In Las Vegas. Price includes plans for 17 units, $75,000, R-3 lot In Boulder City $129,500. CHARMING OLDER HOME in nice area. 3 bdrm., IH bath, carport, large laundry room with workbench. i Close to schools. Crood assumable loan. A great buy at $72,500. CAREFREE LIVING AT IT'S BEST in this completely redecorated 2 bdrm.. IVi bath townhouse. Beautiful fireplace, plush carpet, lovely custom drapes are Just a few of the extras. Good loan can be assumed. Priced at $72,500. JUST WHAT YOU'VE BEEN WAITING FOR .., 3 bdrm., 2 full baths, 2 car garage. Urge fenced yard with automatic sprinklers. Interior freshly painted. Located in quiet cul-d-sac. All for only $75,000. LAKETREE TOWNHOUSE, single story. 3 bdrm., 1% bath. Finished 2 car garage. Great location. $81,500. 1 COZY, COMFORTABLE, CONVENIENT, 3 bdrm., \\ I bath, fireplace, 2 car garage, all new appl., on corner lot near schools, owner licensee. $80,900. CUSTOM 4 bdrm., 1^ bath home located in quiet cul-d' sac. Fra. rm., den, fireplace, large fenced yard. Great family home with over 2300 sq. ft. $102,500. EXCLUSIVE Marina Highland Esutes new 3 bdrm 2 I bath custom home w-unobstructed view of Lake Mead. Open fioor plan w-beautiful fireplace in the liv, rm., I elegant interior decor. $160,000. JPANORAMIC VIEW OF LAKE IWEAD from this cusItom 3 bdrm., W bath. fm. rm. w-fireplace. large game Irm. w-wet bar. Located in one of the most prestigious |areas of Southern Nevada. $171,500. SPACIOUS TWO STORY ... 4 BDRM.. 24 bath, dbl garage, covered patio, large swimming pool. Good terms. $118,500, • GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME will mean more in this I lovely home. 3 bdrm.. IV4 baths, family rm. w-flreplace. I tS X 29 game rm.. 18 x 36 swimming poolfcspa, covered patio. Over 2400 sq. ft. and located only t blocks from I B.C. golf course. $119,500. ILIKE IT? GOLFERS WILL!! Located behind No. 2 tec |is this FHStom 3 bdrm., IH bath home with spectacular view, Guect house, workshop low maintenance yard Imake this an exceptional buy. $14I.S09. IGREAT LAKE MEAD VIEW ... from this custom 4 Ibdrm., 2^4 bath home w-spa in master suite. Two story • |w-open floor plan, large fm. rm., 2 plus car garage, lots of storage, central vac, intercom and much more. 1179,500. FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT DESIGNER HOME completely ftirnlshed 2 bedroom, 2% bath, family room. Cathedral ceiling. Mexican Rose Quartz floor to ceiling fireplace. Completely enclosed, surrounded by palm trees. Security alarm system. Heated swimming pool, RV parking. Call us to see this magnificent home $240,000. ROOM FOR THE FAMILY to grow in this beautiful custom home on a halfacre lot. Lots of space with 4' bdrms., 3 bath, family room, and large game room w-wel bar. Many extras i ncluding 3 fireplaces, one in master .suite which also includes jacuzii tub and balcony. 3 car garage, corrals, and block storage bidg. add to the value. $269,500. LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME? We have a number of excellent sites available. Price di terms are never going to be better than they are now. MOBILE HOMES-24 X 60 VILLA WEST in excellent condition. 2 bdrm IV4 bath, fro. rm.. central heat & air cond. Horizonal siding, composition roof Located in adult only Gingerwood Mobile Home Park. $46,500. 14 X 70SEOUA ...2 bdrm. VisU Estates on rented lot. 1^ bath. Located in Mtn. Call for deUils. $18,500. RETIREE'S DREAM ... 2 bdrm., 1 bath Mobile in excellent condition. Custom kitchen. 2.12 x 56 cabanas 30x 30 garage with W bath and all RV hookups. Maintenance free yard fully enclosed by block wall. Lot Is over \ acre and located in quiet cul-d-sac. This is a "must see". Call today. LARGE CORNER LOT ... very nicely landscaped. Circle driveway, block walls, automatic sprinklers. 2 bdrm.. I'l bath mobile home. 10 x 32 awning, 2 metal sheds. $48,590. .— GOLFER'S DELIGHT This two bdrin. mobile home ^ has a nine hole putting green in the front yard. Plenty of parking, storage, 14 fk-ult trees, and many extras. .168,500 includes lot. 1977 BROADMORE MOBILE HOME IN Mt. VisU Estates, .^pprox. 1000 sq. ft.. 2 bdrm.. 2 bath, desert landscaping. Low utilities and lots of RV parking. Verv j attractive and clean. $64,000. TOLL FREE!! 1-800-545-0902, Ext. E4 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTY. mmt • MM

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uj mV, ^ilOtt APT FOR RENT. 2 bdrm., 1 ^ bath, stova. ref., dishwasher, garbage disposal. Carpets & drapes. Access to washer dryer. Rnt $325 mo. & tlOO security. 5*4-3268. FOR SALE BY OWNER. 4 bdrm.. 1^ bath. 2 car garage. Ig. lot. Near park & Fay Galloway school. Assumable 8% FHA loan. $69,0. Hdn. Call S5-M81. FOR SALE BY OWNER, 2 bdrm.. 2 bath, den (pos. 3rd bdrm.), faiq. rm.. fireplace, covered patio, good landscaping. Separate garage. Great shape k good terms. Asking $82,600. 293-7429. B.C. FOR SALE 14 x 70, 3 bdrm. Mobile home. Porch, awning, skirting, family section. B.C. Park. 293-4344. FOR RENT, 1 bdrm. furnished house. No children, no pets. .Adult only. For info. 293-1173. FiXERTPPERr3"bdrm7T bath home on attractive street, now avail., w-good terms. Close to shopping & schools only $56,000 will consider offers. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor. 293-333. B.C. TWO. 3 bdrm. homes for rent. $400, all util. Included. $400 w-Hreplace, block wall, nice lawn, patio. No pets. Avail. June 1. 564-2377. SELL OR TRADE Las Vegas home for Boulder City or Highland Hills home. 4200sq. ft.. IV4 acre, zoned for horses, swimming pool, $240,000. Assumable loan, $50,000 equity. 361-2223 or 565-1494. B.C. FURN. VERY NICELY. 1 bdrm. apt. Plus water. sewer & garbage. Adults only. No pets. $275 mo. & cleaning dep. 565-6814. LIVE IN BEAUTIFUL St. George. Thriving service buslneis & 5 bdrm.. 2 bath home. 1 block from town. Has a spring on one-third acre. Lots of large trees. Will sell or trade for equity in home la area. All offers contldered. 801-628-1425. MOBILE HOME: Cottage style, cathedral ceilings, light interior, sunken living rm. Mirrored dining & china cabinet, large master bdrm., w.-mirrored wardrobe, 81 dbl wide. 2 bdrm., 2 bth. Siding & shingled roof, carport shed, carpeted patio, landscaped & springklers. Vailla Hermosa adult park. Sp. 20. Asking $38,000. Owner ^5-6625. Lease option. 3 bdrm., 1^ bth 1 yr. old home. $1000 dn. $650 per mo. w-$100 per mo. to apply toward down. Owner will help finance. Owner licensee. June Taylor Realty, Realtors. 382-1330. Eves. 643-8186. .53 ACRE custom lot for sale. Excellent location, walking distance, next door to new Catholic church. $40,000 offer. 293-2651. B.C. FOR RENT: 1-2-3 bdrm. trailers. $50 to $105 wk. 565-6784 or 565-7141. Assume 14% FHA loan. $9000. 3 bdrm., 1^4 bth, auto sprinklers, block wall. $587 mo. pymts. Principals only. Call 565-9830 or 564-7876. CONDOS, RENT OR LEASE $450 mo. deposits and pets negotiable. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, near downtown B.C. Contact Larry Milton, at the Americana Group, Realtors 798-7777 or 452-8509 VALE MOTEL Furnished Studio Apartments with color TV & air cond. Starting at $90 per week. Alsd avail, telephone service, kitchenettes, maid service. 293-1463 B.C. APARTMENTS for sale In B.C. will consider property trade, will finance. 862 Del Rey, B.C. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath w-garage. Enclosed back yard, sprinkler system. Near Basic High School. Very clean, nice neighborhood. Call after 5 p.m. 364-3692. $15,000 DOWN TAKE OVER FHA LOAN. Retirement home, quiet, tasteful decor. Lg. hobby room, RV & Boat parking. Lots of storage, immaculate. Low monthly. Call Josie. 454-8400 at Merrill Lynch Realty 456-1661. 1 BDRM. APT.. $220 mo. $100 cleaning dep. Fum. 564-5581, after 4 p.m. VERY CLEAN. Unf. 2 bdrm. apt. Stove, refrigerator, water, sewer & garbage furn. No pets. $275 plus cleaning deposit 565-6814. /— PRIME 4 ACRE on Garnet PI., near many custom homes. Good terms. Only $39,500. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor, 293-3333. B.C. FOR RENT: Apt, 2 bdrm., 1 bath. Built-ins. Refrigerator, dishwasher. Water & trash paid. $355 mo. 454-6240 or 293-5689. PARADISE HILLS, 105 acre,ll.MO ne|(iable. 665-1310 or \tZ-t\n. FOR RENT: New house • never lived in. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, range, oven, dishwasher, garbage disposal. Kitchen light fan. $550 mo. S64-78M before 9, after 4. 'FOR RENT: Master bdrm. w-private bath. $105 mo. Kitchen A laundry privileges. Couple, single, child ok. 293-3932. IN HENDERSON, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, unf. No pets. $2*5 .per mo. 565-5593 or 451-1723. LAKE MEAD ViEW custom home, $10,000 down. Sale or trade. Flexible terms, no .qualifying. 293-3478. B.C. )KAK(Y TO ENOW wkat yoar frfrty It wcrth? Free market analjrali • Call BOGBR 29S-tM9 Realtor, Deicrt 8H Realty. B.C. FURNISHED APT FOR RENT IN BOULDER CITY Attractively furnished. 2 bdrm., 1 bath Condo in beautiful Boulder Square. Overlooking pool, no sun, low utility fees. Adults only. Only $42S mo. Call for app t. 564-4881, ask for RosaLee. AmniUU HMILY niALTV Dedicated to the American Dream • Home Owr^etship" • Houses for sale $42,000 to $225,000 • Houses for Rent $400.00 to $600.00 •Property Management From years of experience we can handle your rental properties. Stop in at 117 W. Atlantic or call Paul or Charlotte at 564-2878 9 a.ni. to 9 p.m. 2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 Two Sub. 11 Lots for $28,500. Call Iris for deUlls. Desert Sun Realty. Inc. 293-^^151. CHRISTIAN LADY require 1 bdrm. furnished apt by June Lor ro<>m& board w-Christian family. Responsible, dependable, quiet person. Please indicate if small poodle would be allowed. Moving to Henderson near June 1. Will send rent In advance depending on description & price. Write: Marilyn J. Gnirk, 919 St. Cloud, Rapid City, S.D. 57701. STUDIO SLEEPING RM., private entrance & bath. Close in. Completely furn $60. $200 mo. 564-5888. FOR RENT: New house never lived In. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, range, oven, dishwasher, garbage disposal. Kitchen light fan. $550 mo. 564-7890 before 9, after 4. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., family rm. w-fireplace, carpet throughout, stove, refrig., 24 car gar., RV parking. 1st, last, deposit negotiable. 1 yr. lease, no pets. $600 mo. 293-0035. B.C. 1 BDRM. FURN. HOUSE, dbl. carport, extra storage. $295 ino. 878-3880. In Henderson. FOR RENT IN B.C. available May 25, 4 bdrm., family room w-flreplace, pew carpet. RV parking. 871-5568. B.C. NEW I bdrm., apts furnished, $275. Studlee, furnished, $225. Oa Boulder Hwy, E.L.V. next to county park. Hurryl 'Only a few left. Desert Palm Apts. 5750 BIdr. Hwy. 456-6438. FOR RENT : 4 bdrm.. 2 bth. super deluxe home. 260 Princess Anne. Fireplace, dbl. garage. 9 mos. old. $700 mo. Call Mae Anderson. Majestic Realty, 871-6800 or 451-6991. FOR SALE duplex, 2 bdrm., 2 bath. Good income property. Ph. 293-1372. B.C. FOR SALE: Mobile home, furnished. 10 x 40 with 8 x 40 add on, storage shed, covered patio. $13,500. Moore's Mobile Home Park. Call 293-2887 after 6 p.m. B.C. TEDDY'S" KITCHENETTES"Just bring your tooth-' brush 293-1716. B.C. MOBILE HOME in Villa Hermosa Park. 1980 Tamarack. 2 bdrm., 1% bath. Kids OK. All ap pliances. Financing and terms available to right party. No reasonable offer refused. One owner. Licensee. Call 564-5774 or 293-4319 BC. FOR RENT: 2 bdrm., 1 bth. Desert Shadows home. 221 Fullerton. Imm. 4nove in. $400 mo Call Mae Anderson Majestic Realty, 871-6600 or 451-6991. FOR RENT runf. new 3 bdrm., 2 bth., 2 car garage. Carpet, drapes, washerdryer, appliances. $550 & $300 refundable deposit. Ph. 871-4692 anytime. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm. AC $325 mo. In Hdn. 384-2880. nr • iL. ADULT PARK. Trailer for rent w-furniture. $100 cleaning deposit & $400 per mo. Call^ '565-6619. -ar JL BLK MT. GOLF CRS: 4 bed, V, tiled baths, Lv. Rm. FM Rm., 2 frpls: New: carport, plumbing, sId roof. (88) App't only. 565-9452. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath house. Off Center near C. T. Sewell. Stove, carpet, drapes, AC. carport, fenced yd. We pay water. $450 mo. $200 deposit, refundable. 565-1561. FOR SALE, 3 bdrm., 1^ bath, garage & covered carport, fully landscaped $87,500. Located B.C. area, shown by appt. only. 293-1688 or 385-8645. B.C. R AVAIL. APRIL 1st, broker own^, 3 bdrm., l^bathT family room & pool, 1600 sq. ft. Lewis Home. Terrific long term Financing, downpayment negotiable. Call the machine at (213) 378-3423, leave your name & no. Broker, owner will reconUct you with full deUils or purchase, rent, lease option, or exchange. SPACIOUS 2 bdrm., 1 bath, 4 plexes near Channel 5. $300 mo. No pets. Call Pat, 564-6928. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath Lewis Home, walk-in closet, maint. free yard, no pets, RV parking $600 mo. 1st, last $150 deposit. 293-4630. B.C. FOR RENT: New 3 bdrm.. 2 bath, dbl. garage, $450 mo. & deposit. 1300 Palm. Hdn. 564-7461 after 5 & i weekends. FOR RENT: 2 bdrm. apt. Stove, ref.. drapes, carpeting. $310 per mo. & deposits. 565-9660. SMALL STORE FOR RENT on Nev. Hwy. jn Boulder City. Call 2M-1463 or 293-4344. B.C. NOW RENTING \ IMS STORAGE Weekdays, 564-2555 l^kends, 1601 Athoi St. (behind Bingo Barn) SUNSET MOTEL 6000 Boulder Hwy. • East Las Vegas. NV Single Rooms & Kitchenettes. Daily or weekly. ', 10% discount to Senior Citizens. 451-2445. ^PACmCMABoR" APARTMENTS Large 1 bdrm. furn: apartments conveniently located. 53 W. Pacinc Ave. Henderson FOR RENT: 3 bdrm.. 2 bath bouse. Fenced yd. $400 mo. After 5 call 565-8453. OWN "B" HILL, this view lot with 360 degree view Is now avail. In sub. 11. Over 1 acre, plus access easement. $75,000. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor, 293-3333. B.C. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., bouse. Goo4 neighborhood B.C. • | $375 mo. 293-1643. B.C. FOR RENT LA DOLCE FITA CONDO, 2 bdrm., ^ IH bath, all appl. incl. washer & dryer $450 mo. 736-8960 between 8:30 & 5 j p.m. 293-6049 after 5 p.m.'' B.C. FOR RENT APARTMENT, 2 bdrms., 1 Bath. Call Black Mtn. Realty. 564-2727. FOR RENT 2 bdrm. unfurn. apt., carport, adult section, $325 mo. 293-4832. BC KITCHENETTES from $75 weekly. Nevada Inn, 1009 Nev. Hwy. 293-2044. FURNISHED ROOMTPOR RENT In my private adult home t mature, nonsmoker. Kitchen & laundry privileges. $150 per mo. Avail. May 1. 564-3066. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm. unf. house near Basic Lake Mead Dr. Country kitchen, din. rm.. new carpet & drapes & wooden shutters. Clean. Private fenced yd., carport. Must see to appreciate. No pets. $450 mo & $400 deposit References. Call 564-1375 after 4. FOR RENT: LEASE, office space in prime B.C. location. Terms negotiable. Desert Sun Realty 293-2151. B.C. NEiD TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WIU BUY IT NOWl Coli 293-1613 0 A. "Cu'ty" SmitS, lK FOR SALE: LA DOLCE VITA TOWNHOUSE. By owner, 2 bdrm.. IH bath, refrig., range, dishwasher, disposal, mint blinds, fireplace, sun deck, private yard, excellent condition and excellent assumption. $64,500. 1310 A Georgia for appt. 293-3201 or 293-2647. B.C. 2 BDRM. APTg. |Uw util. New & Fk^sh | Near schools It park $310 per mo. 564-5959 or 565-5304. Unfyinishofl Thursday, May 20,1982 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 43 BUILD 10 TO 12 APARTMENTS R-3 Lot over 18,000 sq. ft., excellent location. Owner Licensee. $129,500. Call 293-3267. B.C. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath Lewis Home, walk-in closet, malnt. free yard, no pets. RV parking $575 mo. 1st. last $150 deposit. 293-4630. B.C. NEW 1 BDRM. STUDIO APARTMENTS Furn., util. pd. quiet near shopping center Adults only No pets Senior Citizen Discount Only $280 per mo. 564-5959 or 565-5304 SPLASH IN A POOL OR RELAX IN A SPA when you rent a lovely new Arrowhead Estates Townhome. 3 bdrm., 2V2 bath, 2 car garage, range oven & dishwasher. $575 & dep. Call Sally. 565-8758.11 to 5 p.m. FOR RENT: New house never lived in. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, range, oven, dishwasher, garbage disposal. Kitchen light fan. $550 mo. 564-7890 before 9, after 4. Infuinisl • 2 bedroom ZPoob^ Washing ptehine Hookup NO PETS: Children's •?' Playground • •" • Children Welcome We Welcome Sect. 8 )ESERT GARDEN APARTMENTS Henderson 565-905J 205 Randy Way HendersonJJ NEW 3 bedroom Chism home in Hend. $500 mo. first, last $100 cleaning fee. Adults preferred, no pets. 714-823-9562. 2-COMMERCIAL LOCATIONS FOR RENT at Wyoming and B. 293-2947. B.C V APT FOR RENT. 2 bdrm., 1 bath. Private laundry. Security entry system. Fenced yd. w-playground. Near school. $365 mo. Avail. June 1. 565-6661 or 873-6245. FOR RENT: Kitchenettes. $28 wk. Utilities pd. Shady Rest Motel 565-7688. Hdn. 3 BDRM., 2 BATH, DUPLEX, fenced yd.,^ref. & stove, carpets, drapes. No pets. $385 mo. deposit & security. 564-5923. FOR RENT EXECUTIVE RANCH HOME 2800.sq. ft. Custom Features Corrals $725 per month Call Black Mtn. Realty 564-2727 FOR RENT: Large 2 bdrm., 2 bath Casa Linda w-AC, dishwasher, garbage disI posal, fireplace, fenced yd.. 2 car garage w-auto opener. $525 mo. 454-7139. DUPLEX: $53,000. Ph. 564-2727. Eves. 565-5357. CLOSE-IN BLDG. LOT across from B.C. Hospital. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor, 293-3333. B.C. LIKE NEW, in Hdn. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, low down, 8^% loan. $422 mo. Vacant, first come first served. 456-5964. FOR RENT in B.C. 3 bdrm. house. 293-1937 after 5 p.m. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm. house. Good neighborhood. B.C. $375 mo. 293-1648. CUTE AS A BUTTON: And neat as a pin. 2 bdrm., w-laundry rm. & carport. Fully fenced. Perfect for young or retired couple. Avail, now. $400. American Family Realty' 564-2878. ; 2, 3, & 4 BDRM. HOMES. From $400 per mo. Easy move in. Call today American Family Realty 564-2878. __ r i' M .FOR RENT: Small 2 bdrm.. home, fenced yard, no children, no pets $375 mo. 293-4341. B.C. MOUNTAIN PROPERTY! Mi acre with power and water at Swains Creek, UUh. call 293-2635. B.C. FOR RENT APT. 2 bdrnT,! bath, built-ins. ref.. dishwasher, water St trash pd. $355. 454-6240^ or 293-5689. B.C. • '^' VIEW LOT FOR SALE % acre, Boulder City Subdivision 11, on cul-d-sac. All offers considered. 293-4120. • FOR RENT HEND. avail. June 1. 4 bdrm., 1% bath, $550 per mo., no pets. Call Pat at Great Nev. Properties. 293-5542 or 293-2424. B.C. FOR SALE: 2H acre lot w-water rights, $10,000. $500 dn. No Interest. $75 mo. all to principal. Cedar City Valley. 801-586-6264 or 586-8830 or 586-7227. SAVE A LITTLE ON NEW WEEKLY RATES Ktchenettes. Desert Inn Motel Call 293-2827. B.C. ^^W^s CLOSE TO WORK & SCHOOLS. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, assumption $59,900. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor,. 293-3333. B.C. :BAP FOR SALE B.C. CUSTOM, Across from Golf Course. 2400 sq. ft. 2 story. 4 bdrm.. 3 baths. Fam. rm.. Ig. kitchen w-breakfast bar. One Third acre. Fruit trees. Garden. RV Space. 293-3582. B.C. J FOR SALE 3 bdrm.. 2 bath, ^ custom, FP. Low' $100,000s with view of! lake. 293-6742. B.C. | I TRAILER SPACE FOB, RENT, 8' wide, quietj adult park. $85 mo. Hdn| area. 565-0315. HDN. BEST. UNF, 4 plex. Si bdrm., ref., range. Carpet,] drapes, storage, laundry rm. $290 mo. $100 dep. No ^ pets. 451-1932. ,{1 I FURN. 1 bdrm., stove,| ref.. carpet. Util. pd. 1240. 564-5923. •MltOS 219 WATER ST. HENDERSON, NV. 19015 0 "JIM" JENSEN 0 564-3333 BROKER LAND: BANK REPOSSESSION lake view, Boulder City building lot. $54,950. Superb hillside location with uninterrupted view of Lake Mead. 10^ down, IZVt Financing. Payments $515 per month. Will consider construction loan to qualified buyer. Contact real estate depart. 362-7222. 12 X 64, -72 HILLCREST, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, ZVi ton air. ref.. stove, part furn.. skirting, awning 10 x 20 porch. 2 child ok. 1 pet. corner lot. B.C. trl. park. 293-2663, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. B.C. FOR RENT unfurn. apt. $235 mo.. 2 bdrm., 1st, last & security deposit. 293-3438. B.C. You can't beat the PRICE HENDERSON PLAZA APTS • 2 bedroom • Furn. & Unfurn. • Pool • Family & Adult m i HMTO* Bob Olsen Renlty & Insurnncp Inc. ^" Healtor-MLS 6 \f liter St., Hendenon .t64-l8:il MLS ELTON M. G ARRCTT RCALTV 554 NEVADA HIGHWAY I SINCE 1947 5 INVESTORS DREAM 6 Unit • Sixplex Right Downtown. One 2 bdrm. balance 1 bdrm. rental units. All rented. LOW-LOW down payment Owner wlU carry. MAKE OFFER. HIGHLAND HILLS BEAUTY 3 bdrm.. 1^ bath, family room, fireplace, 2 car garage. Lots of fruit trees. See to believe all the Extras. Priced right. R2 Right Downtown. Low down with low interest FHA payment. 2 bdrm. remodelled townsite. Addition plus outside detached storage. Good Investment. Good Tax Shelter. Good Home. EXCELLENT VALUE 2 bdrm. Townhouse, coiy. well cared for. Security door in rear, patio. Close in. Small down payment with low interest loan. -Call for deUlls. LOVELY 2 STORY. 4 bdrm.. tV, bath. Like newnew appliances, new carpet A drapes. Many extras. Seller will carry with low down. FOURPLEX-LOW DOWN. Almost new. new appllcance & drapes, carpeted. 4 apts. each 2 bdrm. units. Make offer. Will carry on low down. HIGHWAY FRONTAGE 1.29 acres $66,000. Adjacent parcel also frontage 6 J7 acres. Good terms. We have several Commercial pieces as well as Industrial. Call for details. lUlTOnsPVIWTNl Am ratio mis mmm 9ic^ SPECIAL OF THE WEEK ti^ 11 HIGH IN MISSION HILLS: 1 acre lot. lowS [I down. & an excellent value for your money. De-| lightfuUy different... Call Alice. A HOME WITH EVERYTHING! Fireplace,:] bar. swimming pool, zoned heating, established lawn, all done in excellent Uste ... Call Alice.COMMERCIAL!! Prime location, 3 adjacent properties, (land & hidings) perfect for laundramat. garage, convenience store etc.... Call Alice. I 31 MAJOR 3 bdrm., 2 bath home close to schools. Large corner lot. Drive by then... Call Ken. 8 PLEX Eight two bedroom apts, with laundry room. Full occupancy. Good Henderson area.For more ... Call Ken. BRING YOUR H0RSES.3 bdrm., 2 bath. 1 acre, Sec. 29, corrals, tack shed & waterer... Call Ken. V ALLEY VIEW. Fenced. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, full; wall Fireplace In family room. Call Ken. GOOD RENTAL INVESTMENT. 2 bdrm.. trj bath, remodeled, $43,000 ... Call Jim. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY: Two 4 plexes. caif. purchase separately. Low vacancy factor. Alsoone 6 plex ... Call Sally. .• HIGH ON A HILL In Sec. 27. block wall. poo(Hri| 3V^ bath, rireplace, beautiful view... Call Pauir. 2 YEAR OLD. 3 bdrm.. 1^ bath. Ustefully decorated, fenced yd.... Call ^therine. 4 BDRM. IN HIGHLAND HILS. Great buy" w-erf-ellent terms. Ready to move In ... Call Alice. FOR RENT: 2 bdrm.. from $305. EfHclency $190. VIEW 5 ACRE PARCEL. Sec. 9 & 4. CUSTOM HOME LOTS. Zoned R^. Sec. 13. 19. 27,33. COMMERCIAL. Uase for 2 hidings. COMMERCIAL. 100' BIdr. Hwy. Utilities. CHLORIDE. ARIZONA. 3 biding lots. SEC. 93 (5 acre) parcels, zoned Rl. AFTER HOURS CALL: S Jim Jensen AIke FWe Al LeFrancois :;:r..;.;:...: PanI Gargis 1. I Curtis Young ._....._.. I Sally Jensen Katkerine Mitchell Evaljra MorrcU I Becl^ Pantuso ':I|V7 Aan Mave EcB Procter— Chuck Lemming...^ Z sas-mv ,.„ 564-tM2 ,..:..;„.fl64-2722 sts-ctn 565-078 .565-677 ._ 565-6897' ..M5-7SM — 565-8181 JM-14H [ -..S6S-6326 564-2765 CLASSIC 52 Ford Panel Van In top running condition. Slant 6 cyl. eng. Complete original body, complete rewiring, new brtMSg, new tires. $1300 or best offer. 565-0496. MOTORCYCLE. 1972 YAMAHA. 1300 mi. Combination dirt & street. Exc. condition. $290. 293-H0. 78 DODGE V4 TON DIESEL, AC. power steering. 4 sp. trans. Low mileage. Factory inst. $4,000. 293-5838. B.C.. 77 DATSUN KING CAB PICKUP. Asking $3500. 565-5561 or 564-7562. 1976'in;NDA GLIOOO Gold Wing, front fairing. Vetter ^dle bags. elec. ignition. :b>w mileage, exc. conlafter6p.m. B.C. 1977 DATSUN B210 2 dr. sedan. 3 spd., new radials.l new paint, runs good. Ex-i cellent gas mileage on regular gas. Please call 564-7722 after 5 p.m. 1979 HONDA MOTORCYCLE. 185. $650. 564-2574. NEED A CAR? New In Town? Old in Town? N Credit? Short time OB Nte Job? Only $100. $206, $300, or $400 down! Nee6 a^ Automobile to get around? Contact us. We approve ou{LiD* contracts. Instant, delivery. ^ We will pick you up ft > ^ bring you to our car lot Just telephone 564-5909. NEVADA AUTO SALES, 1813 N. BIdr. Hwy., Henderson. Nev. One block south of Sunset Blvd. ft BIdr. Hwy. FOR SALE. 1978 CHEVY NOVA. Boulder City Hospital Is accepting sealed bids for the sale of Its 1978 Chevy 4 door Nova. Inspection is available at hospital. Minimum bid Is $1,700; as is; terms cash. Bids opening on June 1. 1982. Hospital reserves the right to reject all bids. Mail bids to Boulder City Hospital 901 Adams Blvd., Boulder City, Nev. 89005. Attn: M. Homer. B.C. ^ J ft RTRADING POST still has lots of gre{it deals left in our moving sale. Many more Items marked down. 1005 Elm St.. B.C. 293-0260. ANYONE WITNESSING ACCIDENT, Intersection Pinto ft Equestrian, Sun., May 2. approx. 1:30 p.m. please call 564-5383. NOW ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS FOR AUCTION. We buy complete households or large lots of any clean merchandise. Auction 1st Sat. of ea. mo. at 1 p.m. Dally Sales trom store. Darwlns Auctions. 1672 Nev. Hwy.. Marshall Plaza. 293-3996. B.C. LEVOLOR MINI BLINDS. 30% off. Boulder City Interiors. 293-4857. B.C. 36 X 80" ALUM. comb, screen storm door w-frame ft hardware. $40. 293-6366. B.C. ISCELLANEOUS WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS. excellent cond.. incl. cart & bag. RAM 8 irons. 3 Woods. 293-7548. B.C. BLACK MOUNTAIN REALTY 564-2727 107-A WATIR STREH i/|l C VALLIY BANK BUiUMNG "^^^ m RfAlTOR' LOW DOWN ... LEASE-OPTION ... ALL TERMS! DM. wide mobile hm. w-3 bdrms. Large fenced lot. 56*-2727 eve. Joe Vltek 565-0433. $13,-000 TO ASSUME! Plush custom built 4 bdrm., 3 bath on H acre. Formal dining rm, family rm. and more! 564-2727 eve. Betty Gillard, 565-0199. (Pinto). TERMS, OWNER FINANCING... Beautiful 3 bdrm., 2 bath custom hm. w-built in buffet, continuous .p(i, all extras. 564-2727 eve. Betty Gillard, 565-0199. (Turf). • • n DUPLEX ... Hend. area, good income. 564-2727 eve. Jayne Parcel, 564-5357. $28,500 TO ASSUME ... Super custom hm. on Rancho. All the luxury and more! 3 bdrm., 2H baths. 564-2727 eve. Betty Gillard, 565-0199. RIGHT IN TOWN... 5 bdrm., 3 bath... basement... ex. large lot ... super home! $90,000. (Ocean) 564-2727 eve. 564-2447. TERRACED YARD ... low maintanance yard ... 3 bdrm., I'V* bath. 564-2727 eve. Joe Vltek 565-0433. LOW POWER BILLS..: 3 bdrm., 1% bath w-POOL 564-2727 eve. Jayne Parcel, 564-5357. (Greenway), S^PER ASSUMPTION .. and low monthly pymts! Custom 3 bdrm.. 2 bath on ^ acre w-block wall fence. 564^2727 eve. Betty Gillard 565-0199. (Ungacre^). ii^ULDER CITY ... Immaculate 3 bdrm., 1^ bath. -^.000 and owner will carry. 564-2727 eve. Betty ^llard 565-0199. (El Camino). • • ';> i> $13,500 ... and Uke over monthly pymts of $667. Al• ^ost new 3 bdrm., 1% bath U.S. Home. Balanced ;^wer. 564-2727 eve. Joe Vitek, 565-0433. (Engel). POOL... 5 bdrm.. 2 bath, close to town. $10,000 down. f|l4-2727 eve. Jayne Parcel. 564-5357. FIXER UPPER... Definately needs work and owner Will negotiate on Price! 3 bdrm., w-large living rm., fireplace. 564-2727 eve. Carmen. 451-4902 or S64-2447. IfANTASTIC CUSTOM HOME ... on No. 10 Green of Black Mountain Golf Course. Over 2900 sq. ft. of luxury. Beautiful pool, automatic lighting and all amenities. For appt. call 564-2727 eve. 564-2447. (Country Club). %AND ... INVESTMENT .. BUlLDINy^T^^gRMS COMMERCIAL BEES 20 supers, 2 or 3 high. Will sell lor 20. Call 565-9546 or 564-3706 for nre Information. DIVORCE SALE: 1974 Glaspar, 16 ft. open bow. 120 Merc cruiser, exc. cortd. Low hrs. Hust see to appreciate. $4900 or best offer. Recently serviced at Vogue Marine Center, 710 Yucca St., B.C. where it can be seen. PROTECT YOUR SKIN WlTH ALOE VERA sun tan lotion and oil. Aloe Jelly for sunburn. Quality natural and organic products for the skin and hair. Opportunities available call your Sasco distributor. 293-0226 B.C FOR SALE hide -~ft> bed, double, new upholstery blue. 293-1181. B.C. BAR WITH 4 stools, cost $225, asking $100. Queen bed like new $200. 294-0055. B.C. WATERBED. QUEEN SIZE pedlstal, liner, heater, sheets. Good cond. 294-0176. B.C. FOR SALE, like new, hooks iricl. Foam backed curtains & rods. 1 pr. red 100" X 84", white center-draw rod. $25. 1 pr. blue 72" x 63" w-whlte center draw rod $20., 1 pr. one way draw. It. beige stripped 125" X 84" w-1 way draw rod. $30. Call 293-5589, can be sold separately. Fits Lewis homes. B.C. 7^ HP. WARDS OUTBOARD MOTOR. 293-4007. B.C. MISC FOR SALE SWAMP COOLER. 4000 CFM. Lawn mower 21 inch cut, both good cond. 293-6172. B.C. STEAL THIS 80 Glastex 26' deluxe large cruiser, 260 OMC, sleeps 6, stove, refrig., shower, toilet, bar. metal flake blue, full canvas, custom built boat w-trailer, like new, appraised $32,450, must sell $22,950. 293-3522. B.C. G.E. side by side freezer ft refrig. 23.8 cu. ft. frost free, Harvest Gold. $350. 293-7899. B.C. SWAMP COOLER, side draft, great for garage etc. $125. 293-4931. B.C. I4CHOR -^m REALTY PROFESSIONALS PLUS (702) 294-0080 501 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, Nevada 89005 CORNER LOT: 3 bdrm. home, family' jjoom, maintenance free desert landLslcaplng, 1750 sq. ft. Call for appt. Ji97,500. Ilflrs All, HERE: Home with spectacu' 1 lar view of Lake Mead and majestic I mounUlns while enjoying carefree llvI Ing at your pool and enclosed patio. I Appt. anytime. $243,500. (LAKE MEAD VIEiy from this custom iTfl-level home. 3 bdrm., 2>^ baths, 2000 Iplus sq. ft:, intercom, finished garage, Iflreplace and many other extras. Call Ifor appointment. $164,500. • NEW SHARP CUSTOM HOME in cusItom home area. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, family [room with fireplace. $103,000. I SPACIOUS TWO STORY 4 bdrm.. 2H Ibath, doable garage, large yard. I $106,600. |YE8 YOU CAN! Buy this 4 bdrm.. l\ Ibath. 2 car garage for only $107^0. iTastefnIly decorated, mini-blinds and • drapes, plus lots of extras. IBEAUTIFUL S bdrm.. IH bath. M IcjistMi Uteben. large family room. spa. IBV parking aad a 2 car garage. Great ItecaUen. mjM. TASTEFULLY decorated 4 bdrm., 2^ bath home. Custom drapes throughout and many upgrades. Large redwood] porch and large yard. 2 car garage. $130,000. YES YOU WILL simply adore this neat "Lil Charmer." 3 bdrm., 2 bath GOOD j FHA Financing $89,750. STARTER HOME 2 bdrm. Needs TLC $48,000. Call for appt. INCOME PROPERTY TIRED OF PAYING TAXES? Invest your money in this income property for a tax shelter. 2 bdrm., 1 bath home totally remodeled within the last year. Bachelor apartment In rear that has 1 bdm.. 1 bath. All for $78,500. JUST WHAT AN INVESTOR IS LOOKING FOR. A duplex. Unit A; 2 bdrm., 11 bath, storage shed sod appliances. Unit B; 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car garage and apJ pliances. $110,000. LOTS B-HILL AREA V, acre lots. Beautlftil { view of Boulder City. UNOBSTRUCTED view r Lake Mead, | siper lot Ready to build on. FULL SERVICE REALTY \r Free market analysis CALL TOLL FREE 1^00-453-1860, Ext. 310 THE BARGAIN BASEMENT Is having a children's clothing ft toy sale. Tues. thru Frl. Buy 1 article st our reg. low price. Get the second article of equal or less value for H PRICE. The Bargain Baaeaent is not a thrift store, just a thrifty place to shop. Some ft save. 331 Water St.. la the basement • CARPET REMNANTS. Reduced. Many large sizes, good quality. Hurry for best selection, values to $159 now $49 up. Carey's Carpet 2540 E. Charleston (4 block esst off 25Hi on Charleston 3S^7953. FREE -White granite yard rock. You pick up ft haul. 565-6518. TRI-CHEM, liquid Embroidery. Suzanne Welnrlch. 293-0060. B.C. ft • Hend. FOR SALE: 18' Kemskill Travel Trailer has everything. Call 565-7911. BOAT unslnkable as Is. 25 HP Johnson Long stem ft trailer. $525 CASH. 564-1648. INTRODUCING Another new Idea in home heating from Kero-Sun at Jon Porter's Home Video ft Appliance Center. Downtown Boulder City. 293-3638. B.C. IT'S HERE! Whites The world's best known metal, mineral detectors. Jon Porter's Home Video ft Appliance Center, downtown Bouider City. 293-3636. B.C. FOR SALE: Air conditioner, 24.000 BTU. $200. Call Lois. 564-1881. ALOE VERA distributor: Drink the Juice ft not the gel. Best results ft hlpoteBcy. Help your bod^r help Itself. For Arthritis, V Phlebitis, Mkes ft pains. This product not sold Ir stores. Delivered to your home. 564-1648. ALSO-' COSMETICS. V "WOMEN'S BiLE~1 STUDY INTER— DENOMINATIONAL ^vcry Wednetdiy i( 10 A.M. 808 liuh St Free babysitting and refrobmcnU. If you arc a newcomer to |Voulder City, Come iiitk<( new frlcadi. Phono 21 iasagt^ i.mt < ARE VOirLTVfN WlTHi A DRINKING. PROBLEM?? If so, why not try Al Anon? Meetings are Tues., 10 a.m. at St Tiiaothy's Episcopal Church. Tuet, 6*30 p4u Club 51. Wed., 8 p.m., St. Bose de Lima HospitaW For more Information, call 565-9963. Hdn. • -. .., r~ GAMBLER'S ANONYM OUS Is now meeting in the Community Church. 27 E. Texas on Frl. nights at 8 p.m. aa6oaoooi BOAT BARN 568-6966 |30%OFTWALLPAPEI iBoulder City InteriorsJ 293-4837.1000 Nev. Hwy.I Suite 102. B.C. FOR SALE: 14 foot V-bottom "Plpestonc" 75 hp Johnson, motor & trailer, $950. 564-3415 after 6 p.m. WANTED: Used Atari, Mattel & Odessey TV Game Cartridges. 293-0805. Porter Home Video. 12 X 53 SAHARA. 2 sheds, awnings, washing machine. Adult park, Henderson. Asking $10,000. 565-6361 or 565-0599. CARPET SAMPLES, approx. 2x3, reg. $2, now 50 cents ea. Boulder City Interiors, 1000 Nev. Hwy. Suite 102. 293-4857. B.C. STORAGE FOR RENT ISouth of Vo-Tech oni iMtn.VisU. rO'xlO'to50'[ |x 60' units. 458-3990. DECORATED CAKES for weddings. showers, graduation, birthdays ft any occasion. Reasonably pirlced. Have references. Your choice of design. Call 565-5271. KING SIZED WATER BED, reasonable. 564-3815. GUN CABINET, holds 8 guns w-bottom drawer. Perfect condition. Montgomery Ward Console TV, 26". needs repair. 565-6854 until noon. 243 Atlantic. ACCUPUNCTURE • Ar thritis. bursltis, migrine, asthma, allergy, stroke, sciatica, sinus, gout prosUte. 735-7242. LANDSCAPE RAILROAD TIES all 2 ft. ft 3 ft. must be sold, $2. ea. 362-6276 or 873-4386. B.C. TOP SOIL, decorative rock, nil, sand ft gravel, free delivery, backhoe ft tractor available, any type hauling ft gen. cleanup. 293-2031 after 3 p.m. B.C 1972 26'Callfornlan. self contained, ac ft heater 293-7912. B.C. SINGER,' PIANIST, ORGANIST avail, for your ent..'rlainment or organization meeting. Also writer. Ph. Raye's Studio 565-8469. Flo Raymond. ORIGINAL ART WORK. Pastels, oils by artist. Those interested ph. 565-8469, Flo Raymond. BOl'LDER CITY, house fbr rent, 3 bdrm., 2 bath. Ig. yard, block wall enclosed wpatio. close to schools parks & pool. 293-4120. B.C. m am mgm K msm B i Bm j FOR THE GRADUATE [Give a lasting gift INISURANCE POLICY. • Take advantage of low {rates, plus guaranteeing ^heir insurability. Call 564-5804 1976 MALLARD TRAVEL • TRAILER. Fully equipped. Self contained. Rear twin beds. Air ft full bath. See at Eldorado Mobile Park. 293-3467. B.C. NEW 2 bdrm., 2 bath condo. Overland EsUtes, behind First Western Plaza. $450 mo. 293-0226. FOR RENT. 3 bdrm., 1^< bath, $435 mo., 1st last ft security, probably negotiable. 293-1017. B.C. FOR RENT, Available soon. 2 bdrm. house. Mature or retired couple, no pets. 293-4007. B.C. GINGERWOOD MOBILE HOME PARK, 12 X 60 2 bdrm., beautiful view of the desert. 293-3507. B.C SEE LAKE MEAD and live next to the mountains in beautiful Lake Mountain Estates. 2 bdrm., 2 bath Buckingham Coach on your own fully landscaped lot. For info. ph. 293-7654. B.C. 3 BDRM. HOUSE FOR SALE in Hend. Asking $59,000. $19,000 down assumable at Wt^ at $385 mo. Call ater 5 p.m. 565-7991. B.C. FOR RENT: 4 bdrm., 2 bath Casa Linda. Carpet, drapes, air, fireplace. Ig. kitchen w-dishwasher, garbage disposal, patio, fenced vd., auto sprinklers. $595 mo 454-7139. BOULDER CITY LOT "i acre, horse zoned. Lot 22, utilities. $30,000. Onethird down. By owner. 293-7719 B.C. ELECTRIC GUITAR, tuner, practice amp. $200 or best offer. 565-1460. MOBILE HOME ft LOT FOR SALE, Silvercrest, 24 X 56, updated interior, block wall 2-sides, double driveway, shed, fenced-in yard, completely landscaped w-auto. sprinkler system, lovely view of Lake Mead. By owner, 293-6750 or 293-2263. B.C. FOR RENT CUTE COTTAGE 500 sq. ft.. 1 bdrm., large lot & shed $320 mo. Ist. last & deposit. 293-7637. B.C. STEEL BUILDINGS NEVER PUT UP-GRAIN COMMERCIAL (1) 30' x I 40' reUil $8500. will sell • for $4350. (1) 50'X 100'reUil $21,000. Need $12,500. • Call 1-800-525-8075. HOUSEFUL OF FURN. Everything goes. Only 5 mos. old. Call 565-7197. FOR SALE: 2 twin size mattresses. Original cost, $70. Now $35.6 mos. old. 1 box spring ft mattress, twin size, $25. 2 twin size headboards, $5. each. 1 full size headboard, $10. 564-3523. HOUSE OF STITCHERY 331 S. Water St, We are CLOSING our doors May 28.20<^ discount off ', all stitehery, needlepoint, crewel, latch hook kits, ft rug canvas. Pre-cut rug yarn by Red Heart ft Caron, 25 cents pkg. Plastic canvas, pres-board, ceramics ft I I much more. Buy now ft save. > 0000000>COOOOOO000000 WANTED Green Valley Newspapers of MARCH 4, 1982 for our files to be bound. Ph. 564-1881 or bring in to HOME NEWS office, 22 Water St., Hdn. |i(£ ST.ROSEDELfMA M •O The Most Friendly ^ ^•Hospital Ip The Counter.IjMg BY OWNER, Assume $50,000 at 9h%. $78,000 firm. Owner willing to carry 2nd. $10,000 down. 3 bdrm., 1500 sq. ft. 2"^ yrs. old. Lewis Homes in Henderson. Owner Agent (714 979-6976, after 5:30 p.m. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath family room. Built-ins. Fenced yard. Henderson Hills. $550 mo. 1st ft last Owner may waive cleaning deposit. (714) 979-6976, after 5:30 p.m. NEW CONDOMINIUM on Overland Estates, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, $56,500. Elton M. Garrett Realty. ^ Realtor. 293-3333. B.C. FOR RENT: Mobile home.7 bdrm., furn. Fenced yd. Good condition. $300 mo. 1970 Mobile home, 12 x 60. 2 bdrm., 14 bath for sale. $8000.1967 Ford MusUng for sale. $500. 564-6801. EXECUTIVE DREAM HOME. Quality living in this 3 bdrm.. custom. Easy care, low maintenance yd. w-abundance of flowers. Beautiful 15' x 40'pool, w-diving board. June 30 occupancy. American Family Realty 564-2878. Merrill Lynch Realty b jack Matthews 456-1661 Carol Rozich Listing Agent^ HAiOt^ 293-4950 MLB LAKE MEAD VIEW PROPERTIES BOIUDER CITY VIEW OF LAKE from most rooms. .Approx. 3150 sq. ft furnished 4 bedrooms, pool, $325,000. APPROX. 2600 sq. ft. HOME plus unrinished 675 sq. ft. mother-in-law apartment. $220,000. 3 BEDROOM. 2 bath, 1600 sq. ft. 119.750. Terms EXECUTIVE ESTATE on 14 acres, pool. 3 car garage. View of lake. PRESTIGIOUS LOCATION lot in Claremont Heights, overlooking lake. $80,000 terms. Owner will negotiate. ALSO AVAILABLE Dl'PLEX in downtown Boulder City $119,500. 3 BEDROOM HOME w-income apt. $79,500. Henderson Realty INC THE PROPERTY PEOPLE" RESIDENTIAL ACREAGE INVESTMENT OWNER TRANSFERRED Must sell, immaculate City View Terrace home. Assume FHA loan. OVERLOOKING GOLF COURSE. Nice home with assumable FHA loan. Family room, fireplace, wet bar. Call today. TAKE A BIG STEP FORWARD. Custom home on 1 acre in Mission Hills. Everything you could want! MAGNIFICENT VIEW. Spanish style 3 bdrm. custom home. Wrought iron decor, completely fenced. A must see! JUST TAKE OVER PAYMENTS on FHA loan, pay closing costs and move in. Custom home zoned RR, 1900 sq. ft. of nice living. CLEAN AND GREEN. Located in Highland Hills. Popular Sonars model. FHA assumable loan. OUT IN THE COUNTRY. Lewis home near Old Vegas. 3 bdrm.. $19,500 down ft assume loan. COMMERCIAL BOULDER HYW. MOTEL. Terms negotiable. Good investment. 3 BDRM. HOUSE zoned COMMERCIAL. Call today. Excellent location. LEASE OR SALE, Industrial prop. Sunset Rd. Warehouse space. -I—FOB RENT 3 BDRM. Patio Home. Camarlo Valley. $575 per month. 2 BDRM. DUPLEX. $325. Roomy floorplan. 2 BDRM. home on Mevers St. $400 per month. I Great tlevndo k^ropMtles Co. • 1000 Nevada Hwy Suite 109 Boulder City 89005 293-5542 (B FULL SERVICE REALTY • RESIDENTIAL eLAND • COMMERCIAL e INVESTMENTS __ ePROPERTY MANAGEMENT 3855 South Valley View Suite One Las Vegas 89103 MM 871-0223 564-2515 18 Water Slreei Henderson 454-2222 2501 N. Green Valley Plata Suite 102 Henderson BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES BEAUTY SUPPLY. Price includes business ftxtures and inventory. $2S.S00. BAKERY SHOPPE; $150,000 BIYS BUSINESS, EQUIPMENT, BUILDING AND LAND. COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR SALE OR LEASE. PURCHASE PRICE $120,000. FANTASTIC CORNER LOCATION heavy traffic corner Business property and some equipment priced to sell. $105,000. ,'BOULDER CITY BEAUTIFl'L 3 bedroom home with pool, family rm with large breakfast bar. A real must to see. Priced below market $115,000. Call today for viewing. CORNER LOT, ideal home for retirees, young marrleds or investment 3 J>edroom, l\ baths. 2 car garage. Priced at $74,500. VILLA DEL PRADO 2 story 4 bedrooms. Corner lot. Priced to sell $105,000. .EXECUTIVES DREAM HOME 4 bdrm., spa, 3 full baths, too many extras to list Call for deUils. Overlooks the enUre City. HURRY, HURRY, come see this lovely 3 bdrm., Lewis home. Upgraded carpet & beautiful custom drapes compliment the practical family floor plan. Price $102,000. WE HAVE RENTALS AVAILABLE! L' BEAUTIFUL, clean, cozy describe this 3 bedroom. 1^4 bath Lewis Home with family room, fireplace and covered patio. Just a few of the many features, call todav to view this beauty. Priced to sell. $105,900. OWNER WILL FINANCE -• good Investment home, corner lot, remodeled and upgraded inside and out. $65,000. CUL DE SAC IDEAL FOR THE YOUNG FAMILY, NICE NEIGHBORHOOD, fenced yard, close to schools, ichurch and shopping. Country kitchen. 1^ baths. 3 bedrooms. Priced $76,500. B HILL corner lot on cul-de-sac. Priced $38,000. HENDERSON HIGHLAND HILLS. 4 bdrm 24 bath, pool, upgraded throughout VA assumable loan, priced at $112,000. HIGHLAND HILLS over 2500 sq. ft.Yull basement. Great home for large family Tamily room, game room. 2^ baths. Price reduced $79,500. SHOWLOW, ARIZONA Golf course lot Will exchange for property in Boulder City Henderson area. Call for details. LAS VEGAS .3 bedroom home, 1 and one third bath, converted gaf-agc can be used as 4lh bedroom, or family room. Priced to sell $63,500. CUTE STARTER or retirement home. A-ft'ame with loft that can be used as 2nd. bedroom. .Assumable loan at S.S'V plus owner will carry 2nd. Priced at I $54,950 DIANA BUNNEV PEGGY MAUCERJ LORRAtNE SEMAN. MGB PAT MUKPHY GEORGE SEMAN i ^^fcrf^B^i^ ^mat^mt ^te*i tfaghsai^ i^^t^tm

PAGE 43

uj mV, ^ilOtt APT FOR RENT. 2 bdrm., 1 ^ bath, stova. ref., dishwasher, garbage disposal. Carpets & drapes. Access to washer dryer. Rnt $325 mo. & tlOO security. 5*4-3268. FOR SALE BY OWNER. 4 bdrm.. 1^ bath. 2 car garage. Ig. lot. Near park & Fay Galloway school. Assumable 8% FHA loan. $69,0. Hdn. Call S5-M81. FOR SALE BY OWNER, 2 bdrm.. 2 bath, den (pos. 3rd bdrm.), faiq. rm.. fireplace, covered patio, good landscaping. Separate garage. Great shape k good terms. Asking $82,600. 293-7429. B.C. FOR SALE 14 x 70, 3 bdrm. Mobile home. Porch, awning, skirting, family section. B.C. Park. 293-4344. FOR RENT, 1 bdrm. furnished house. No children, no pets. .Adult only. For info. 293-1173. FiXERTPPERr3"bdrm7T bath home on attractive street, now avail., w-good terms. Close to shopping & schools only $56,000 will consider offers. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor. 293-333. B.C. TWO. 3 bdrm. homes for rent. $400, all util. Included. $400 w-Hreplace, block wall, nice lawn, patio. No pets. Avail. June 1. 564-2377. SELL OR TRADE Las Vegas home for Boulder City or Highland Hills home. 4200sq. ft.. IV4 acre, zoned for horses, swimming pool, $240,000. Assumable loan, $50,000 equity. 361-2223 or 565-1494. B.C. FURN. VERY NICELY. 1 bdrm. apt. Plus water. sewer & garbage. Adults only. No pets. $275 mo. & cleaning dep. 565-6814. LIVE IN BEAUTIFUL St. George. Thriving service buslneis & 5 bdrm.. 2 bath home. 1 block from town. Has a spring on one-third acre. Lots of large trees. Will sell or trade for equity in home la area. All offers contldered. 801-628-1425. MOBILE HOME: Cottage style, cathedral ceilings, light interior, sunken living rm. Mirrored dining & china cabinet, large master bdrm., w.-mirrored wardrobe, 81 dbl wide. 2 bdrm., 2 bth. Siding & shingled roof, carport shed, carpeted patio, landscaped & springklers. Vailla Hermosa adult park. Sp. 20. Asking $38,000. Owner ^5-6625. Lease option. 3 bdrm., 1^ bth 1 yr. old home. $1000 dn. $650 per mo. w-$100 per mo. to apply toward down. Owner will help finance. Owner licensee. June Taylor Realty, Realtors. 382-1330. Eves. 643-8186. .53 ACRE custom lot for sale. Excellent location, walking distance, next door to new Catholic church. $40,000 offer. 293-2651. B.C. FOR RENT: 1-2-3 bdrm. trailers. $50 to $105 wk. 565-6784 or 565-7141. Assume 14% FHA loan. $9000. 3 bdrm., 1^4 bth, auto sprinklers, block wall. $587 mo. pymts. Principals only. Call 565-9830 or 564-7876. CONDOS, RENT OR LEASE $450 mo. deposits and pets negotiable. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, near downtown B.C. Contact Larry Milton, at the Americana Group, Realtors 798-7777 or 452-8509 VALE MOTEL Furnished Studio Apartments with color TV & air cond. Starting at $90 per week. Alsd avail, telephone service, kitchenettes, maid service. 293-1463 B.C. APARTMENTS for sale In B.C. will consider property trade, will finance. 862 Del Rey, B.C. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath w-garage. Enclosed back yard, sprinkler system. Near Basic High School. Very clean, nice neighborhood. Call after 5 p.m. 364-3692. $15,000 DOWN TAKE OVER FHA LOAN. Retirement home, quiet, tasteful decor. Lg. hobby room, RV & Boat parking. Lots of storage, immaculate. Low monthly. Call Josie. 454-8400 at Merrill Lynch Realty 456-1661. 1 BDRM. APT.. $220 mo. $100 cleaning dep. Fum. 564-5581, after 4 p.m. VERY CLEAN. Unf. 2 bdrm. apt. Stove, refrigerator, water, sewer & garbage furn. No pets. $275 plus cleaning deposit 565-6814. /— PRIME 4 ACRE on Garnet PI., near many custom homes. Good terms. Only $39,500. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor, 293-3333. B.C. FOR RENT: Apt, 2 bdrm., 1 bath. Built-ins. Refrigerator, dishwasher. Water & trash paid. $355 mo. 454-6240 or 293-5689. PARADISE HILLS, 105 acre,ll.MO ne|(iable. 665-1310 or \tZ-t\n. FOR RENT: New house • never lived in. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, range, oven, dishwasher, garbage disposal. Kitchen light fan. $550 mo. S64-78M before 9, after 4. 'FOR RENT: Master bdrm. w-private bath. $105 mo. Kitchen A laundry privileges. Couple, single, child ok. 293-3932. IN HENDERSON, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, unf. No pets. $2*5 .per mo. 565-5593 or 451-1723. LAKE MEAD ViEW custom home, $10,000 down. Sale or trade. Flexible terms, no .qualifying. 293-3478. B.C. )KAK(Y TO ENOW wkat yoar frfrty It wcrth? Free market analjrali • Call BOGBR 29S-tM9 Realtor, Deicrt 8H Realty. B.C. FURNISHED APT FOR RENT IN BOULDER CITY Attractively furnished. 2 bdrm., 1 bath Condo in beautiful Boulder Square. Overlooking pool, no sun, low utility fees. Adults only. Only $42S mo. Call for app t. 564-4881, ask for RosaLee. AmniUU HMILY niALTV Dedicated to the American Dream • Home Owr^etship" • Houses for sale $42,000 to $225,000 • Houses for Rent $400.00 to $600.00 •Property Management From years of experience we can handle your rental properties. Stop in at 117 W. Atlantic or call Paul or Charlotte at 564-2878 9 a.ni. to 9 p.m. 2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 Two Sub. 11 Lots for $28,500. Call Iris for deUlls. Desert Sun Realty. Inc. 293-^^151. CHRISTIAN LADY require 1 bdrm. furnished apt by June Lor ro<>m& board w-Christian family. Responsible, dependable, quiet person. Please indicate if small poodle would be allowed. Moving to Henderson near June 1. Will send rent In advance depending on description & price. Write: Marilyn J. Gnirk, 919 St. Cloud, Rapid City, S.D. 57701. STUDIO SLEEPING RM., private entrance & bath. Close in. Completely furn $60. $200 mo. 564-5888. FOR RENT: New house never lived In. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, range, oven, dishwasher, garbage disposal. Kitchen light fan. $550 mo. 564-7890 before 9, after 4. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., family rm. w-fireplace, carpet throughout, stove, refrig., 24 car gar., RV parking. 1st, last, deposit negotiable. 1 yr. lease, no pets. $600 mo. 293-0035. B.C. 1 BDRM. FURN. HOUSE, dbl. carport, extra storage. $295 ino. 878-3880. In Henderson. FOR RENT IN B.C. available May 25, 4 bdrm., family room w-flreplace, pew carpet. RV parking. 871-5568. B.C. NEW I bdrm., apts furnished, $275. Studlee, furnished, $225. Oa Boulder Hwy, E.L.V. next to county park. Hurryl 'Only a few left. Desert Palm Apts. 5750 BIdr. Hwy. 456-6438. FOR RENT : 4 bdrm.. 2 bth. super deluxe home. 260 Princess Anne. Fireplace, dbl. garage. 9 mos. old. $700 mo. Call Mae Anderson. Majestic Realty, 871-6800 or 451-6991. FOR SALE duplex, 2 bdrm., 2 bath. Good income property. Ph. 293-1372. B.C. FOR SALE: Mobile home, furnished. 10 x 40 with 8 x 40 add on, storage shed, covered patio. $13,500. Moore's Mobile Home Park. Call 293-2887 after 6 p.m. B.C. TEDDY'S" KITCHENETTES"Just bring your tooth-' brush 293-1716. B.C. MOBILE HOME in Villa Hermosa Park. 1980 Tamarack. 2 bdrm., 1% bath. Kids OK. All ap pliances. Financing and terms available to right party. No reasonable offer refused. One owner. Licensee. Call 564-5774 or 293-4319 BC. FOR RENT: 2 bdrm., 1 bth. Desert Shadows home. 221 Fullerton. Imm. 4nove in. $400 mo Call Mae Anderson Majestic Realty, 871-6600 or 451-6991. FOR RENT runf. new 3 bdrm., 2 bth., 2 car garage. Carpet, drapes, washerdryer, appliances. $550 & $300 refundable deposit. Ph. 871-4692 anytime. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm. AC $325 mo. In Hdn. 384-2880. nr • iL. ADULT PARK. Trailer for rent w-furniture. $100 cleaning deposit & $400 per mo. Call^ '565-6619. -ar JL BLK MT. GOLF CRS: 4 bed, V, tiled baths, Lv. Rm. FM Rm., 2 frpls: New: carport, plumbing, sId roof. (88) App't only. 565-9452. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath house. Off Center near C. T. Sewell. Stove, carpet, drapes, AC. carport, fenced yd. We pay water. $450 mo. $200 deposit, refundable. 565-1561. FOR SALE, 3 bdrm., 1^ bath, garage & covered carport, fully landscaped $87,500. Located B.C. area, shown by appt. only. 293-1688 or 385-8645. B.C. R AVAIL. APRIL 1st, broker own^, 3 bdrm., l^bathT family room & pool, 1600 sq. ft. Lewis Home. Terrific long term Financing, downpayment negotiable. Call the machine at (213) 378-3423, leave your name & no. Broker, owner will reconUct you with full deUils or purchase, rent, lease option, or exchange. SPACIOUS 2 bdrm., 1 bath, 4 plexes near Channel 5. $300 mo. No pets. Call Pat, 564-6928. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath Lewis Home, walk-in closet, maint. free yard, no pets, RV parking $600 mo. 1st, last $150 deposit. 293-4630. B.C. FOR RENT: New 3 bdrm.. 2 bath, dbl. garage, $450 mo. & deposit. 1300 Palm. Hdn. 564-7461 after 5 & i weekends. FOR RENT: 2 bdrm. apt. Stove, ref.. drapes, carpeting. $310 per mo. & deposits. 565-9660. SMALL STORE FOR RENT on Nev. Hwy. jn Boulder City. Call 2M-1463 or 293-4344. B.C. NOW RENTING \ IMS STORAGE Weekdays, 564-2555 l^kends, 1601 Athoi St. (behind Bingo Barn) SUNSET MOTEL 6000 Boulder Hwy. • East Las Vegas. NV Single Rooms & Kitchenettes. Daily or weekly. ', 10% discount to Senior Citizens. 451-2445. ^PACmCMABoR" APARTMENTS Large 1 bdrm. furn: apartments conveniently located. 53 W. Pacinc Ave. Henderson FOR RENT: 3 bdrm.. 2 bath bouse. Fenced yd. $400 mo. After 5 call 565-8453. OWN "B" HILL, this view lot with 360 degree view Is now avail. In sub. 11. Over 1 acre, plus access easement. $75,000. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor, 293-3333. B.C. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., bouse. Goo4 neighborhood B.C. • | $375 mo. 293-1643. B.C. FOR RENT LA DOLCE FITA CONDO, 2 bdrm., ^ IH bath, all appl. incl. washer & dryer $450 mo. 736-8960 between 8:30 & 5 j p.m. 293-6049 after 5 p.m.'' B.C. FOR RENT APARTMENT, 2 bdrms., 1 Bath. Call Black Mtn. Realty. 564-2727. FOR RENT 2 bdrm. unfurn. apt., carport, adult section, $325 mo. 293-4832. BC KITCHENETTES from $75 weekly. Nevada Inn, 1009 Nev. Hwy. 293-2044. FURNISHED ROOMTPOR RENT In my private adult home t mature, nonsmoker. Kitchen & laundry privileges. $150 per mo. Avail. May 1. 564-3066. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm. unf. house near Basic Lake Mead Dr. Country kitchen, din. rm.. new carpet & drapes & wooden shutters. Clean. Private fenced yd., carport. Must see to appreciate. No pets. $450 mo & $400 deposit References. Call 564-1375 after 4. FOR RENT: LEASE, office space in prime B.C. location. Terms negotiable. Desert Sun Realty 293-2151. B.C. NEiD TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WIU BUY IT NOWl Coli 293-1613 0 A. "Cu'ty" SmitS, lK FOR SALE: LA DOLCE VITA TOWNHOUSE. By owner, 2 bdrm.. IH bath, refrig., range, dishwasher, disposal, mint blinds, fireplace, sun deck, private yard, excellent condition and excellent assumption. $64,500. 1310 A Georgia for appt. 293-3201 or 293-2647. B.C. 2 BDRM. APTg. |Uw util. New & Fk^sh | Near schools It park $310 per mo. 564-5959 or 565-5304. Unfyinishofl Thursday, May 20,1982 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 43 BUILD 10 TO 12 APARTMENTS R-3 Lot over 18,000 sq. ft., excellent location. Owner Licensee. $129,500. Call 293-3267. B.C. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath Lewis Home, walk-in closet, malnt. free yard, no pets. RV parking $575 mo. 1st. last $150 deposit. 293-4630. B.C. NEW 1 BDRM. STUDIO APARTMENTS Furn., util. pd. quiet near shopping center Adults only No pets Senior Citizen Discount Only $280 per mo. 564-5959 or 565-5304 SPLASH IN A POOL OR RELAX IN A SPA when you rent a lovely new Arrowhead Estates Townhome. 3 bdrm., 2V2 bath, 2 car garage, range oven & dishwasher. $575 & dep. Call Sally. 565-8758.11 to 5 p.m. FOR RENT: New house never lived in. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, range, oven, dishwasher, garbage disposal. Kitchen light fan. $550 mo. 564-7890 before 9, after 4. Infuinisl • 2 bedroom ZPoob^ Washing ptehine Hookup NO PETS: Children's •?' Playground • •" • Children Welcome We Welcome Sect. 8 )ESERT GARDEN APARTMENTS Henderson 565-905J 205 Randy Way HendersonJJ NEW 3 bedroom Chism home in Hend. $500 mo. first, last $100 cleaning fee. Adults preferred, no pets. 714-823-9562. 2-COMMERCIAL LOCATIONS FOR RENT at Wyoming and B. 293-2947. B.C V APT FOR RENT. 2 bdrm., 1 bath. Private laundry. Security entry system. Fenced yd. w-playground. Near school. $365 mo. Avail. June 1. 565-6661 or 873-6245. FOR RENT: Kitchenettes. $28 wk. Utilities pd. Shady Rest Motel 565-7688. Hdn. 3 BDRM., 2 BATH, DUPLEX, fenced yd.,^ref. & stove, carpets, drapes. No pets. $385 mo. deposit & security. 564-5923. FOR RENT EXECUTIVE RANCH HOME 2800.sq. ft. Custom Features Corrals $725 per month Call Black Mtn. Realty 564-2727 FOR RENT: Large 2 bdrm., 2 bath Casa Linda w-AC, dishwasher, garbage disI posal, fireplace, fenced yd.. 2 car garage w-auto opener. $525 mo. 454-7139. DUPLEX: $53,000. Ph. 564-2727. Eves. 565-5357. CLOSE-IN BLDG. LOT across from B.C. Hospital. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor, 293-3333. B.C. LIKE NEW, in Hdn. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, low down, 8^% loan. $422 mo. Vacant, first come first served. 456-5964. FOR RENT in B.C. 3 bdrm. house. 293-1937 after 5 p.m. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm. house. Good neighborhood. B.C. $375 mo. 293-1648. CUTE AS A BUTTON: And neat as a pin. 2 bdrm., w-laundry rm. & carport. Fully fenced. Perfect for young or retired couple. Avail, now. $400. American Family Realty' 564-2878. ; 2, 3, & 4 BDRM. HOMES. From $400 per mo. Easy move in. Call today American Family Realty 564-2878. __ r i' M .FOR RENT: Small 2 bdrm.. home, fenced yard, no children, no pets $375 mo. 293-4341. B.C. MOUNTAIN PROPERTY! Mi acre with power and water at Swains Creek, UUh. call 293-2635. B.C. FOR RENT APT. 2 bdrnT,! bath, built-ins. ref.. dishwasher, water St trash pd. $355. 454-6240^ or 293-5689. B.C. • '^' VIEW LOT FOR SALE % acre, Boulder City Subdivision 11, on cul-d-sac. All offers considered. 293-4120. • FOR RENT HEND. avail. June 1. 4 bdrm., 1% bath, $550 per mo., no pets. Call Pat at Great Nev. Properties. 293-5542 or 293-2424. B.C. FOR SALE: 2H acre lot w-water rights, $10,000. $500 dn. No Interest. $75 mo. all to principal. Cedar City Valley. 801-586-6264 or 586-8830 or 586-7227. SAVE A LITTLE ON NEW WEEKLY RATES Ktchenettes. Desert Inn Motel Call 293-2827. B.C. ^^W^s CLOSE TO WORK & SCHOOLS. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, assumption $59,900. Elton M. Garrett Realty, Realtor,. 293-3333. B.C. :BAP FOR SALE B.C. CUSTOM, Across from Golf Course. 2400 sq. ft. 2 story. 4 bdrm.. 3 baths. Fam. rm.. Ig. kitchen w-breakfast bar. One Third acre. Fruit trees. Garden. RV Space. 293-3582. B.C. J FOR SALE 3 bdrm.. 2 bath, ^ custom, FP. Low' $100,000s with view of! lake. 293-6742. B.C. | I TRAILER SPACE FOB, RENT, 8' wide, quietj adult park. $85 mo. Hdn| area. 565-0315. HDN. BEST. UNF, 4 plex. Si bdrm., ref., range. Carpet,] drapes, storage, laundry rm. $290 mo. $100 dep. No ^ pets. 451-1932. ,{1 I FURN. 1 bdrm., stove,| ref.. carpet. Util. pd. 1240. 564-5923. •MltOS 219 WATER ST. HENDERSON, NV. 19015 0 "JIM" JENSEN 0 564-3333 BROKER LAND: BANK REPOSSESSION lake view, Boulder City building lot. $54,950. Superb hillside location with uninterrupted view of Lake Mead. 10^ down, IZVt Financing. Payments $515 per month. Will consider construction loan to qualified buyer. Contact real estate depart. 362-7222. 12 X 64, -72 HILLCREST, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, ZVi ton air. ref.. stove, part furn.. skirting, awning 10 x 20 porch. 2 child ok. 1 pet. corner lot. B.C. trl. park. 293-2663, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. B.C. FOR RENT unfurn. apt. $235 mo.. 2 bdrm., 1st, last & security deposit. 293-3438. B.C. You can't beat the PRICE HENDERSON PLAZA APTS • 2 bedroom • Furn. & Unfurn. • Pool • Family & Adult m i HMTO* Bob Olsen Renlty & Insurnncp Inc. ^" Healtor-MLS 6 \f liter St., Hendenon .t64-l8:il MLS ELTON M. G ARRCTT RCALTV 554 NEVADA HIGHWAY I SINCE 1947 5 INVESTORS DREAM 6 Unit • Sixplex Right Downtown. One 2 bdrm. balance 1 bdrm. rental units. All rented. LOW-LOW down payment Owner wlU carry. MAKE OFFER. HIGHLAND HILLS BEAUTY 3 bdrm.. 1^ bath, family room, fireplace, 2 car garage. Lots of fruit trees. See to believe all the Extras. Priced right. R2 Right Downtown. Low down with low interest FHA payment. 2 bdrm. remodelled townsite. Addition plus outside detached storage. Good Investment. Good Tax Shelter. Good Home. EXCELLENT VALUE 2 bdrm. Townhouse, coiy. well cared for. Security door in rear, patio. Close in. Small down payment with low interest loan. -Call for deUlls. LOVELY 2 STORY. 4 bdrm.. tV, bath. Like newnew appliances, new carpet A drapes. Many extras. Seller will carry with low down. FOURPLEX-LOW DOWN. Almost new. new appllcance & drapes, carpeted. 4 apts. each 2 bdrm. units. Make offer. Will carry on low down. HIGHWAY FRONTAGE 1.29 acres $66,000. Adjacent parcel also frontage 6 J7 acres. Good terms. We have several Commercial pieces as well as Industrial. Call for details. lUlTOnsPVIWTNl Am ratio mis mmm 9ic^ SPECIAL OF THE WEEK ti^ 11 HIGH IN MISSION HILLS: 1 acre lot. lowS [I down. & an excellent value for your money. De-| lightfuUy different... Call Alice. A HOME WITH EVERYTHING! Fireplace,:] bar. swimming pool, zoned heating, established lawn, all done in excellent Uste ... Call Alice.COMMERCIAL!! Prime location, 3 adjacent properties, (land & hidings) perfect for laundramat. garage, convenience store etc.... Call Alice. I 31 MAJOR 3 bdrm., 2 bath home close to schools. Large corner lot. Drive by then... Call Ken. 8 PLEX Eight two bedroom apts, with laundry room. Full occupancy. Good Henderson area.For more ... Call Ken. BRING YOUR H0RSES.3 bdrm., 2 bath. 1 acre, Sec. 29, corrals, tack shed & waterer... Call Ken. V ALLEY VIEW. Fenced. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, full; wall Fireplace In family room. Call Ken. GOOD RENTAL INVESTMENT. 2 bdrm.. trj bath, remodeled, $43,000 ... Call Jim. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY: Two 4 plexes. caif. purchase separately. Low vacancy factor. Alsoone 6 plex ... Call Sally. .• HIGH ON A HILL In Sec. 27. block wall. poo(Hri| 3V^ bath, rireplace, beautiful view... Call Pauir. 2 YEAR OLD. 3 bdrm.. 1^ bath. Ustefully decorated, fenced yd.... Call ^therine. 4 BDRM. IN HIGHLAND HILS. Great buy" w-erf-ellent terms. Ready to move In ... Call Alice. FOR RENT: 2 bdrm.. from $305. EfHclency $190. VIEW 5 ACRE PARCEL. Sec. 9 & 4. CUSTOM HOME LOTS. Zoned R^. Sec. 13. 19. 27,33. COMMERCIAL. Uase for 2 hidings. COMMERCIAL. 100' BIdr. Hwy. Utilities. CHLORIDE. ARIZONA. 3 biding lots. SEC. 93 (5 acre) parcels, zoned Rl. AFTER HOURS CALL: S Jim Jensen AIke FWe Al LeFrancois :;:r..;.;:...: PanI Gargis 1. I Curtis Young ._....._.. I Sally Jensen Katkerine Mitchell Evaljra MorrcU I Becl^ Pantuso ':I|V7 Aan Mave EcB Procter— Chuck Lemming...^ Z sas-mv ,.„ 564-tM2 ,..:..;„.fl64-2722 sts-ctn 565-078 .565-677 ._ 565-6897' ..M5-7SM — 565-8181 JM-14H [ -..S6S-6326 564-2765 CLASSIC 52 Ford Panel Van In top running condition. Slant 6 cyl. eng. Complete original body, complete rewiring, new brtMSg, new tires. $1300 or best offer. 565-0496. MOTORCYCLE. 1972 YAMAHA. 1300 mi. Combination dirt & street. Exc. condition. $290. 293-H0. 78 DODGE V4 TON DIESEL, AC. power steering. 4 sp. trans. Low mileage. Factory inst. $4,000. 293-5838. B.C.. 77 DATSUN KING CAB PICKUP. Asking $3500. 565-5561 or 564-7562. 1976'in;NDA GLIOOO Gold Wing, front fairing. Vetter ^dle bags. elec. ignition. :b>w mileage, exc. conlafter6p.m. B.C. 1977 DATSUN B210 2 dr. sedan. 3 spd., new radials.l new paint, runs good. Ex-i cellent gas mileage on regular gas. Please call 564-7722 after 5 p.m. 1979 HONDA MOTORCYCLE. 185. $650. 564-2574. NEED A CAR? New In Town? Old in Town? N Credit? Short time OB Nte Job? Only $100. $206, $300, or $400 down! Nee6 a^ Automobile to get around? Contact us. We approve ou{LiD* contracts. Instant, delivery. ^ We will pick you up ft > ^ bring you to our car lot Just telephone 564-5909. NEVADA AUTO SALES, 1813 N. BIdr. Hwy., Henderson. Nev. One block south of Sunset Blvd. ft BIdr. Hwy. FOR SALE. 1978 CHEVY NOVA. Boulder City Hospital Is accepting sealed bids for the sale of Its 1978 Chevy 4 door Nova. Inspection is available at hospital. Minimum bid Is $1,700; as is; terms cash. Bids opening on June 1. 1982. Hospital reserves the right to reject all bids. Mail bids to Boulder City Hospital 901 Adams Blvd., Boulder City, Nev. 89005. Attn: M. Homer. B.C. ^ J ft RTRADING POST still has lots of gre{it deals left in our moving sale. Many more Items marked down. 1005 Elm St.. B.C. 293-0260. ANYONE WITNESSING ACCIDENT, Intersection Pinto ft Equestrian, Sun., May 2. approx. 1:30 p.m. please call 564-5383. NOW ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS FOR AUCTION. We buy complete households or large lots of any clean merchandise. Auction 1st Sat. of ea. mo. at 1 p.m. Dally Sales trom store. Darwlns Auctions. 1672 Nev. Hwy.. Marshall Plaza. 293-3996. B.C. LEVOLOR MINI BLINDS. 30% off. Boulder City Interiors. 293-4857. B.C. 36 X 80" ALUM. comb, screen storm door w-frame ft hardware. $40. 293-6366. B.C. ISCELLANEOUS WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS. excellent cond.. incl. cart & bag. RAM 8 irons. 3 Woods. 293-7548. B.C. BLACK MOUNTAIN REALTY 564-2727 107-A WATIR STREH i/|l C VALLIY BANK BUiUMNG "^^^ m RfAlTOR' LOW DOWN ... LEASE-OPTION ... ALL TERMS! DM. wide mobile hm. w-3 bdrms. Large fenced lot. 56*-2727 eve. Joe Vltek 565-0433. $13,-000 TO ASSUME! Plush custom built 4 bdrm., 3 bath on H acre. Formal dining rm, family rm. and more! 564-2727 eve. Betty Gillard, 565-0199. (Pinto). TERMS, OWNER FINANCING... Beautiful 3 bdrm., 2 bath custom hm. w-built in buffet, continuous .p(i, all extras. 564-2727 eve. Betty Gillard, 565-0199. (Turf). • • n DUPLEX ... Hend. area, good income. 564-2727 eve. Jayne Parcel, 564-5357. $28,500 TO ASSUME ... Super custom hm. on Rancho. All the luxury and more! 3 bdrm., 2H baths. 564-2727 eve. Betty Gillard, 565-0199. RIGHT IN TOWN... 5 bdrm., 3 bath... basement... ex. large lot ... super home! $90,000. (Ocean) 564-2727 eve. 564-2447. TERRACED YARD ... low maintanance yard ... 3 bdrm., I'V* bath. 564-2727 eve. Joe Vltek 565-0433. LOW POWER BILLS..: 3 bdrm., 1% bath w-POOL 564-2727 eve. Jayne Parcel, 564-5357. (Greenway), S^PER ASSUMPTION .. and low monthly pymts! Custom 3 bdrm.. 2 bath on ^ acre w-block wall fence. 564^2727 eve. Betty Gillard 565-0199. (Ungacre^). ii^ULDER CITY ... Immaculate 3 bdrm., 1^ bath. -^.000 and owner will carry. 564-2727 eve. Betty ^llard 565-0199. (El Camino). • • ';> i> $13,500 ... and Uke over monthly pymts of $667. Al• ^ost new 3 bdrm., 1% bath U.S. Home. Balanced ;^wer. 564-2727 eve. Joe Vitek, 565-0433. (Engel). POOL... 5 bdrm.. 2 bath, close to town. $10,000 down. f|l4-2727 eve. Jayne Parcel. 564-5357. FIXER UPPER... Definately needs work and owner Will negotiate on Price! 3 bdrm., w-large living rm., fireplace. 564-2727 eve. Carmen. 451-4902 or S64-2447. IfANTASTIC CUSTOM HOME ... on No. 10 Green of Black Mountain Golf Course. Over 2900 sq. ft. of luxury. Beautiful pool, automatic lighting and all amenities. For appt. call 564-2727 eve. 564-2447. (Country Club). %AND ... INVESTMENT .. BUlLDINy^T^^gRMS COMMERCIAL BEES 20 supers, 2 or 3 high. Will sell lor 20. Call 565-9546 or 564-3706 for nre Information. DIVORCE SALE: 1974 Glaspar, 16 ft. open bow. 120 Merc cruiser, exc. cortd. Low hrs. Hust see to appreciate. $4900 or best offer. Recently serviced at Vogue Marine Center, 710 Yucca St., B.C. where it can be seen. PROTECT YOUR SKIN WlTH ALOE VERA sun tan lotion and oil. Aloe Jelly for sunburn. Quality natural and organic products for the skin and hair. Opportunities available call your Sasco distributor. 293-0226 B.C FOR SALE hide -~ft> bed, double, new upholstery blue. 293-1181. B.C. BAR WITH 4 stools, cost $225, asking $100. Queen bed like new $200. 294-0055. B.C. WATERBED. QUEEN SIZE pedlstal, liner, heater, sheets. Good cond. 294-0176. B.C. FOR SALE, like new, hooks iricl. Foam backed curtains & rods. 1 pr. red 100" X 84", white center-draw rod. $25. 1 pr. blue 72" x 63" w-whlte center draw rod $20., 1 pr. one way draw. It. beige stripped 125" X 84" w-1 way draw rod. $30. Call 293-5589, can be sold separately. Fits Lewis homes. B.C. 7^ HP. WARDS OUTBOARD MOTOR. 293-4007. B.C. MISC FOR SALE SWAMP COOLER. 4000 CFM. Lawn mower 21 inch cut, both good cond. 293-6172. B.C. STEAL THIS 80 Glastex 26' deluxe large cruiser, 260 OMC, sleeps 6, stove, refrig., shower, toilet, bar. metal flake blue, full canvas, custom built boat w-trailer, like new, appraised $32,450, must sell $22,950. 293-3522. B.C. G.E. side by side freezer ft refrig. 23.8 cu. ft. frost free, Harvest Gold. $350. 293-7899. B.C. SWAMP COOLER, side draft, great for garage etc. $125. 293-4931. B.C. I4CHOR -^m REALTY PROFESSIONALS PLUS (702) 294-0080 501 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, Nevada 89005 CORNER LOT: 3 bdrm. home, family' jjoom, maintenance free desert landLslcaplng, 1750 sq. ft. Call for appt. Ji97,500. Ilflrs All, HERE: Home with spectacu' 1 lar view of Lake Mead and majestic I mounUlns while enjoying carefree llvI Ing at your pool and enclosed patio. I Appt. anytime. $243,500. (LAKE MEAD VIEiy from this custom iTfl-level home. 3 bdrm., 2>^ baths, 2000 Iplus sq. ft:, intercom, finished garage, Iflreplace and many other extras. Call Ifor appointment. $164,500. • NEW SHARP CUSTOM HOME in cusItom home area. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, family [room with fireplace. $103,000. I SPACIOUS TWO STORY 4 bdrm.. 2H Ibath, doable garage, large yard. I $106,600. |YE8 YOU CAN! Buy this 4 bdrm.. l\ Ibath. 2 car garage for only $107^0. iTastefnIly decorated, mini-blinds and • drapes, plus lots of extras. IBEAUTIFUL S bdrm.. IH bath. M IcjistMi Uteben. large family room. spa. IBV parking aad a 2 car garage. Great ItecaUen. mjM. TASTEFULLY decorated 4 bdrm., 2^ bath home. Custom drapes throughout and many upgrades. Large redwood] porch and large yard. 2 car garage. $130,000. YES YOU WILL simply adore this neat "Lil Charmer." 3 bdrm., 2 bath GOOD j FHA Financing $89,750. STARTER HOME 2 bdrm. Needs TLC $48,000. Call for appt. INCOME PROPERTY TIRED OF PAYING TAXES? Invest your money in this income property for a tax shelter. 2 bdrm., 1 bath home totally remodeled within the last year. Bachelor apartment In rear that has 1 bdm.. 1 bath. All for $78,500. JUST WHAT AN INVESTOR IS LOOKING FOR. A duplex. Unit A; 2 bdrm., 11 bath, storage shed sod appliances. Unit B; 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car garage and apJ pliances. $110,000. LOTS B-HILL AREA V, acre lots. Beautlftil { view of Boulder City. UNOBSTRUCTED view r Lake Mead, | siper lot Ready to build on. FULL SERVICE REALTY \r Free market analysis CALL TOLL FREE 1^00-453-1860, Ext. 310 THE BARGAIN BASEMENT Is having a children's clothing ft toy sale. Tues. thru Frl. Buy 1 article st our reg. low price. Get the second article of equal or less value for H PRICE. The Bargain Baaeaent is not a thrift store, just a thrifty place to shop. Some ft save. 331 Water St.. la the basement • CARPET REMNANTS. Reduced. Many large sizes, good quality. Hurry for best selection, values to $159 now $49 up. Carey's Carpet 2540 E. Charleston (4 block esst off 25Hi on Charleston 3S^7953. FREE -White granite yard rock. You pick up ft haul. 565-6518. TRI-CHEM, liquid Embroidery. Suzanne Welnrlch. 293-0060. B.C. ft • Hend. FOR SALE: 18' Kemskill Travel Trailer has everything. Call 565-7911. BOAT unslnkable as Is. 25 HP Johnson Long stem ft trailer. $525 CASH. 564-1648. INTRODUCING Another new Idea in home heating from Kero-Sun at Jon Porter's Home Video ft Appliance Center. Downtown Boulder City. 293-3638. B.C. IT'S HERE! Whites The world's best known metal, mineral detectors. Jon Porter's Home Video ft Appliance Center, downtown Bouider City. 293-3636. B.C. FOR SALE: Air conditioner, 24.000 BTU. $200. Call Lois. 564-1881. ALOE VERA distributor: Drink the Juice ft not the gel. Best results ft hlpoteBcy. Help your bod^r help Itself. For Arthritis, V Phlebitis, Mkes ft pains. This product not sold Ir stores. Delivered to your home. 564-1648. ALSO-' COSMETICS. V "WOMEN'S BiLE~1 STUDY INTER— DENOMINATIONAL ^vcry Wednetdiy i( 10 A.M. 808 liuh St Free babysitting and refrobmcnU. If you arc a newcomer to |Voulder City, Come iiitk<( new frlcadi. Phono 21 iasagt^ i.mt < ARE VOirLTVfN WlTHi A DRINKING. PROBLEM?? If so, why not try Al Anon? Meetings are Tues., 10 a.m. at St Tiiaothy's Episcopal Church. Tuet, 6*30 p4u Club 51. Wed., 8 p.m., St. Bose de Lima HospitaW For more Information, call 565-9963. Hdn. • -. .., r~ GAMBLER'S ANONYM OUS Is now meeting in the Community Church. 27 E. Texas on Frl. nights at 8 p.m. aa6oaoooi BOAT BARN 568-6966 |30%OFTWALLPAPEI iBoulder City InteriorsJ 293-4837.1000 Nev. Hwy.I Suite 102. B.C. FOR SALE: 14 foot V-bottom "Plpestonc" 75 hp Johnson, motor & trailer, $950. 564-3415 after 6 p.m. WANTED: Used Atari, Mattel & Odessey TV Game Cartridges. 293-0805. Porter Home Video. 12 X 53 SAHARA. 2 sheds, awnings, washing machine. Adult park, Henderson. Asking $10,000. 565-6361 or 565-0599. CARPET SAMPLES, approx. 2x3, reg. $2, now 50 cents ea. Boulder City Interiors, 1000 Nev. Hwy. Suite 102. 293-4857. B.C. STORAGE FOR RENT ISouth of Vo-Tech oni iMtn.VisU. rO'xlO'to50'[ |x 60' units. 458-3990. DECORATED CAKES for weddings. showers, graduation, birthdays ft any occasion. Reasonably pirlced. Have references. Your choice of design. Call 565-5271. KING SIZED WATER BED, reasonable. 564-3815. GUN CABINET, holds 8 guns w-bottom drawer. Perfect condition. Montgomery Ward Console TV, 26". needs repair. 565-6854 until noon. 243 Atlantic. ACCUPUNCTURE • Ar thritis. bursltis, migrine, asthma, allergy, stroke, sciatica, sinus, gout prosUte. 735-7242. LANDSCAPE RAILROAD TIES all 2 ft. ft 3 ft. must be sold, $2. ea. 362-6276 or 873-4386. B.C. TOP SOIL, decorative rock, nil, sand ft gravel, free delivery, backhoe ft tractor available, any type hauling ft gen. cleanup. 293-2031 after 3 p.m. B.C 1972 26'Callfornlan. self contained, ac ft heater 293-7912. B.C. SINGER,' PIANIST, ORGANIST avail, for your ent..'rlainment or organization meeting. Also writer. Ph. Raye's Studio 565-8469. Flo Raymond. ORIGINAL ART WORK. Pastels, oils by artist. Those interested ph. 565-8469, Flo Raymond. BOl'LDER CITY, house fbr rent, 3 bdrm., 2 bath. Ig. yard, block wall enclosed wpatio. close to schools parks & pool. 293-4120. B.C. m am mgm K msm B i Bm j FOR THE GRADUATE [Give a lasting gift INISURANCE POLICY. • Take advantage of low {rates, plus guaranteeing ^heir insurability. Call 564-5804 1976 MALLARD TRAVEL • TRAILER. Fully equipped. Self contained. Rear twin beds. Air ft full bath. See at Eldorado Mobile Park. 293-3467. B.C. NEW 2 bdrm., 2 bath condo. Overland EsUtes, behind First Western Plaza. $450 mo. 293-0226. FOR RENT. 3 bdrm., 1^< bath, $435 mo., 1st last ft security, probably negotiable. 293-1017. B.C. FOR RENT, Available soon. 2 bdrm. house. Mature or retired couple, no pets. 293-4007. B.C. GINGERWOOD MOBILE HOME PARK, 12 X 60 2 bdrm., beautiful view of the desert. 293-3507. B.C SEE LAKE MEAD and live next to the mountains in beautiful Lake Mountain Estates. 2 bdrm., 2 bath Buckingham Coach on your own fully landscaped lot. For info. ph. 293-7654. B.C. 3 BDRM. HOUSE FOR SALE in Hend. Asking $59,000. $19,000 down assumable at Wt^ at $385 mo. Call ater 5 p.m. 565-7991. B.C. FOR RENT: 4 bdrm., 2 bath Casa Linda. Carpet, drapes, air, fireplace. Ig. kitchen w-dishwasher, garbage disposal, patio, fenced vd., auto sprinklers. $595 mo 454-7139. BOULDER CITY LOT "i acre, horse zoned. Lot 22, utilities. $30,000. Onethird down. By owner. 293-7719 B.C. ELECTRIC GUITAR, tuner, practice amp. $200 or best offer. 565-1460. MOBILE HOME ft LOT FOR SALE, Silvercrest, 24 X 56, updated interior, block wall 2-sides, double driveway, shed, fenced-in yard, completely landscaped w-auto. sprinkler system, lovely view of Lake Mead. By owner, 293-6750 or 293-2263. B.C. FOR RENT CUTE COTTAGE 500 sq. ft.. 1 bdrm., large lot & shed $320 mo. Ist. last & deposit. 293-7637. B.C. STEEL BUILDINGS NEVER PUT UP-GRAIN COMMERCIAL (1) 30' x I 40' reUil $8500. will sell • for $4350. (1) 50'X 100'reUil $21,000. Need $12,500. • Call 1-800-525-8075. HOUSEFUL OF FURN. Everything goes. Only 5 mos. old. Call 565-7197. FOR SALE: 2 twin size mattresses. Original cost, $70. Now $35.6 mos. old. 1 box spring ft mattress, twin size, $25. 2 twin size headboards, $5. each. 1 full size headboard, $10. 564-3523. HOUSE OF STITCHERY 331 S. Water St, We are CLOSING our doors May 28.20<^ discount off ', all stitehery, needlepoint, crewel, latch hook kits, ft rug canvas. Pre-cut rug yarn by Red Heart ft Caron, 25 cents pkg. Plastic canvas, pres-board, ceramics ft I I much more. Buy now ft save. > 0000000>COOOOOO000000 WANTED Green Valley Newspapers of MARCH 4, 1982 for our files to be bound. Ph. 564-1881 or bring in to HOME NEWS office, 22 Water St., Hdn. |i(£ ST.ROSEDELfMA M •O The Most Friendly ^ ^•Hospital Ip The Counter.IjMg BY OWNER, Assume $50,000 at 9h%. $78,000 firm. Owner willing to carry 2nd. $10,000 down. 3 bdrm., 1500 sq. ft. 2"^ yrs. old. Lewis Homes in Henderson. Owner Agent (714 979-6976, after 5:30 p.m. FOR RENT: 3 bdrm., 2 bath family room. Built-ins. Fenced yard. Henderson Hills. $550 mo. 1st ft last Owner may waive cleaning deposit. (714) 979-6976, after 5:30 p.m. NEW CONDOMINIUM on Overland Estates, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, $56,500. Elton M. Garrett Realty. ^ Realtor. 293-3333. B.C. FOR RENT: Mobile home.7 bdrm., furn. Fenced yd. Good condition. $300 mo. 1970 Mobile home, 12 x 60. 2 bdrm., 14 bath for sale. $8000.1967 Ford MusUng for sale. $500. 564-6801. EXECUTIVE DREAM HOME. Quality living in this 3 bdrm.. custom. Easy care, low maintenance yd. w-abundance of flowers. Beautiful 15' x 40'pool, w-diving board. June 30 occupancy. American Family Realty 564-2878. Merrill Lynch Realty b jack Matthews 456-1661 Carol Rozich Listing Agent^ HAiOt^ 293-4950 MLB LAKE MEAD VIEW PROPERTIES BOIUDER CITY VIEW OF LAKE from most rooms. .Approx. 3150 sq. ft furnished 4 bedrooms, pool, $325,000. APPROX. 2600 sq. ft. HOME plus unrinished 675 sq. ft. mother-in-law apartment. $220,000. 3 BEDROOM. 2 bath, 1600 sq. ft. 119.750. Terms EXECUTIVE ESTATE on 14 acres, pool. 3 car garage. View of lake. PRESTIGIOUS LOCATION lot in Claremont Heights, overlooking lake. $80,000 terms. Owner will negotiate. ALSO AVAILABLE Dl'PLEX in downtown Boulder City $119,500. 3 BEDROOM HOME w-income apt. $79,500. Henderson Realty INC THE PROPERTY PEOPLE" RESIDENTIAL ACREAGE INVESTMENT OWNER TRANSFERRED Must sell, immaculate City View Terrace home. Assume FHA loan. OVERLOOKING GOLF COURSE. Nice home with assumable FHA loan. Family room, fireplace, wet bar. Call today. TAKE A BIG STEP FORWARD. Custom home on 1 acre in Mission Hills. Everything you could want! MAGNIFICENT VIEW. Spanish style 3 bdrm. custom home. Wrought iron decor, completely fenced. A must see! JUST TAKE OVER PAYMENTS on FHA loan, pay closing costs and move in. Custom home zoned RR, 1900 sq. ft. of nice living. CLEAN AND GREEN. Located in Highland Hills. Popular Sonars model. FHA assumable loan. OUT IN THE COUNTRY. Lewis home near Old Vegas. 3 bdrm.. $19,500 down ft assume loan. COMMERCIAL BOULDER HYW. MOTEL. Terms negotiable. Good investment. 3 BDRM. HOUSE zoned COMMERCIAL. Call today. Excellent location. LEASE OR SALE, Industrial prop. Sunset Rd. Warehouse space. -I—FOB RENT 3 BDRM. Patio Home. Camarlo Valley. $575 per month. 2 BDRM. DUPLEX. $325. Roomy floorplan. 2 BDRM. home on Mevers St. $400 per month. I Great tlevndo k^ropMtles Co. • 1000 Nevada Hwy Suite 109 Boulder City 89005 293-5542 (B FULL SERVICE REALTY • RESIDENTIAL eLAND • COMMERCIAL e INVESTMENTS __ ePROPERTY MANAGEMENT 3855 South Valley View Suite One Las Vegas 89103 MM 871-0223 564-2515 18 Water Slreei Henderson 454-2222 2501 N. Green Valley Plata Suite 102 Henderson BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES BEAUTY SUPPLY. Price includes business ftxtures and inventory. $2S.S00. BAKERY SHOPPE; $150,000 BIYS BUSINESS, EQUIPMENT, BUILDING AND LAND. COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR SALE OR LEASE. PURCHASE PRICE $120,000. FANTASTIC CORNER LOCATION heavy traffic corner Business property and some equipment priced to sell. $105,000. ,'BOULDER CITY BEAUTIFl'L 3 bedroom home with pool, family rm with large breakfast bar. A real must to see. Priced below market $115,000. Call today for viewing. CORNER LOT, ideal home for retirees, young marrleds or investment 3 J>edroom, l\ baths. 2 car garage. Priced at $74,500. VILLA DEL PRADO 2 story 4 bedrooms. Corner lot. Priced to sell $105,000. .EXECUTIVES DREAM HOME 4 bdrm., spa, 3 full baths, too many extras to list Call for deUils. Overlooks the enUre City. HURRY, HURRY, come see this lovely 3 bdrm., Lewis home. Upgraded carpet & beautiful custom drapes compliment the practical family floor plan. Price $102,000. WE HAVE RENTALS AVAILABLE! L' BEAUTIFUL, clean, cozy describe this 3 bedroom. 1^4 bath Lewis Home with family room, fireplace and covered patio. Just a few of the many features, call todav to view this beauty. Priced to sell. $105,900. OWNER WILL FINANCE -• good Investment home, corner lot, remodeled and upgraded inside and out. $65,000. CUL DE SAC IDEAL FOR THE YOUNG FAMILY, NICE NEIGHBORHOOD, fenced yard, close to schools, ichurch and shopping. Country kitchen. 1^ baths. 3 bedrooms. Priced $76,500. B HILL corner lot on cul-de-sac. Priced $38,000. HENDERSON HIGHLAND HILLS. 4 bdrm 24 bath, pool, upgraded throughout VA assumable loan, priced at $112,000. HIGHLAND HILLS over 2500 sq. ft.Yull basement. Great home for large family Tamily room, game room. 2^ baths. Price reduced $79,500. SHOWLOW, ARIZONA Golf course lot Will exchange for property in Boulder City Henderson area. Call for details. LAS VEGAS .3 bedroom home, 1 and one third bath, converted gaf-agc can be used as 4lh bedroom, or family room. Priced to sell $63,500. CUTE STARTER or retirement home. A-ft'ame with loft that can be used as 2nd. bedroom. .Assumable loan at S.S'V plus owner will carry 2nd. Priced at I $54,950 DIANA BUNNEV PEGGY MAUCERJ LORRAtNE SEMAN. MGB PAT MUKPHY GEORGE SEMAN i ^^fcrf^B^i^ ^mat^mt ^te*i tfaghsai^ i^^t^tm

PAGE 44

Page 44 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday. May 20,1982. *< HIWHAT A SUPER CARPET SALE! COMMERCIAL TIGHT WEAVE CARPET Excellent for stores, offices, dens and all High Traffic Areas... Many colors and patterns to^ choose from. YOU CAN AFFORD THE BEST NOW HEAVY SHAG HI-LO PLUSH CARPET 1 Available in 10 gorgeous colors and tweeds. Tone on Tone to fill your every need...FHA AP-' PROVED. NOW CARPET INDOOR-OUTDOOR At unheard of low low prices... Numerous patterns and colors to select from... Perfect for that patio, dining area, pool area, kitchen etc... Easy to maintain and gives that neat elegant look! i FLOOR OF TIMELESS BEAUTY ^ FIRST % f^ TIME ^ HI-LO CARPET Many colors available... You can fit yburl decjjr with this new i^eautifui textured! lvalue. NOW REMIMAIMTS UP TO I t WE DON'T MEET PRICES...WE BEAT EVERYBODY'S PRICES! CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATES BUY TODAY...WE INSTALL TOMORROW!^ 384-8551 X105 WEST CHARLESTON • ;,':." PLENTY OF FREE PARKING '""' • PINANCMQ AVAILABLE ON CREDIT APPROVAI. • .jlwlvil|i|ji|ilLi!llpru|H(fimiliFTm M^A^MMBriMfl^a^^i^ iMa^ ^^i^